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Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

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emmea90
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Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by emmea90 » 09/09/2019, 15:48

Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down
The final contest of the season will be about Giro d'Italia.

What we want you to do is to draw a Giro upside down, like it was in 2009 (but better than that s**t route)

The only constraints of Giro are the following
1. You are not allowed to do stages in last week in Liguria, Emilia-Romagna and the regions above
2. One stage of last week must have a finish in Calabria
3. Campania, Molise, Puglia, Basilicata, Abruzzo must have at least stage finish in the race.
4. You are not allowed to start or go out of Italy
5. There should be at least 3 high mountain stages in last week

Deadline will be on Saturday October 12, when first rider passes the finish line on Giro di Lombardia
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jajoejoe
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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by jajoejoe » 09/09/2019, 18:44

Are local circuits allowed this time?

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sportdani19
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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by sportdani19 » 09/09/2019, 20:55

i don't understand,we should make the last stage in South of Italy?

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Arnorius
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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by Arnorius » 13/09/2019, 11:12

almost impossible to make a nice Giro with these rules. If I conclude it that are 6 regions with hardly any big mountains that we have to have a finish in in the last week. (because it would be pointless to start in these regions and then go back to calabria in the last week)

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kanon16
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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by kanon16 » 13/09/2019, 11:43

How many rest days/days racing in this Giro?
In case of 2 rest days the last week can be of 7 or more stages?..
Last edited by kanon16 on 13/09/2019, 16:44, edited 1 time in total.

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improb
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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by improb » 13/09/2019, 15:14

Italy is full of mountains. It isn't that hard to make three high mountain stages in the regions OP has mentioned. Aside from that, from what I understand only a Calabria stage must be in the last week, the rest of the regions mentioned must just have a simple stage finish, anywhere in the race.

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jajoejoe
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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by jajoejoe » 13/09/2019, 20:27

This is my Upside Down Giro. I really liked this idea for the contest: Simple yet challenging and I kinda like the Giro I made. First of all it may be a good idea to change the purple-like box on the top of every pages as there are a couple of mistakes in it and not everybody would know there is a new contest. With that out of the way let's get on with it.
maps/tours/view/12865

Stage 1: Aquileia > Cividale del Friuli

Image
This stage starts in the beautiful town of Aquileia, known for it's Ancient Roman remains and the Cathedral, that's why Aquileia is a Unesco World Heritage site. We immediatly head south to Grado on an island, which means if the wind blows hard enough some riders may get surprised, but with the amount of kilometers left this is unlikely. The rest of the stage isn't anything special. The 2 cllimbs on the road are mainly there so there's a leader in the KOM standings, important for the sponsor of the KOM jersey.

Stage 2: Gemona del Friuli > San Pietro di Feletto

Image
We start this stage with a loop through the Julian Alps with the steep Sella Carnizza and the less steep Passo Tanamea, after this we have a few quite steep climbs visit Buja, de Marchi's hometown, and move further west. The name of the finishing town may not ring many bells, but it is on top of the Muro Ca' del Poggio.

Stage 3: Conegliano > Pieve di Soligo

Image
Just a plain and simple TTT, apart from the fact it goes slightly uphill I don't have anything to say about this stage. (Please no kiddie pools next to the route though).

Stage 4: Valdobbiadene > Fondo Grande

Image
First day for the GC guys to create big gaps. The double climb in the finale enables long range attacks as the top from the penultimate climb is 7,5Km from the finish, plus the fact that the penultimate climbs has long parts with slopes above 10%. A little side note, I didn't think the Passo Vezzena was worthy of a KOM prize but I wanted to give it a little feature in this route

Stage 5: Schio > Maranello

Image
No messing around as we immediatly move south crossing the Po "Valley". Finish is in Maranello, known because of Ferrari, the sprinters won't go that fast but they will go fast.

Stage 6: Maranello > Massa

Image
Today could be a day for the GC or for the breakaway, considering the trend of GC stages this year this should be one for the break.

Stage 7: Massa > Autodromo Internazionale del Mugello

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The sprinters can go there way again today on the famous Mugello circuit known for the MotoGP race there every year

Stage 8: Dicomano > San Leo

Image
One for the GC again. the Ubersteep Cippo di Carpegna enables long range plans and the dubble climb with the splendid Sant'Agata Feltria inbetween thins the field even further. The finish is next to the spectacular Rocca di San Leo overlooking the maybe even prettier town of San Leo.

Stage 9: Urbania > Cingoli

Image
A stage that could be a crazy day in the Marche as the last 50Km are constantly up and down, we pass through Cingoli twice but the finish line only once.

<<< REST DAY >>>

Stage 10: San Benedetto del Tronto > Pescara

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We start in San Benedetto del Tronto but not for a short ITT like in the Tirreno-Adriatico. This a sprinter's stage, period.

Stage 11: Pescara > Roccamontepiano

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We first climb towards the Gran Sasso, turn right and we go to the Camp Imperatore, we don't do that we'll head towards the Blockhaus but we will turn left before the top and climb the steep Legnaia before heading towards the finish.

Stage 12: Termoli > Montenero di Bissaccia

Image
The first ITT of this Giro, it's a hard ITT with lots of uphill parts, most of it go uphill slowly so the real powerhouses will gain time there. The last climb to the finish will enable the lesser Time Trialists to gain back some time.

Stage 13: Campobasso > Lago Laceno

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Another Mountain stage, but easier than the last one. the Climb to Lago Laceno is steeper than the average slope suggests with slopes over 10%

Stage 14: Lioni > Castel del Monte

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This is one for the strong sprinters as the last 4 kilometers go up with an average of just over 2%. On our way to Castel del Monte we pass the Monte Vultre, a volcano. Castel del Monte is a beautiful Fortification and just like Aquileia in stage 1 this is a Unesco World Heritage Site. I had the oppurtunity to place the finish next to the Castel del Monte, but the road to the top is short, small, not steep enough and with a big peloton it's bound to cause some trouble.

Stage 15: Altamura > Potenza

Image
This is a stage for the break. We spend most of the latter part of this stage on the Via Appia, luckily for the riders this road has been renewed for a couple of times since the Roman Empire fell. Just like Cingoli we pass the finishing city twice but the finish line only once. the final climb to the finish consists of a short wall like the Pau ITT in the TdF of this year.

<<< REST DAY >>>

Stage 16: Catanzaro > Nicotera

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The long Zungri climb followed by the steep Monte Poro and the Madonna della Scala with little kick-up to the line could make this a stage not to be underestimated. I took my inspiration for this stage from the stage to Como in this year's Giro which turned out to be a much more spectacular stage than expected in front.

Stage 17: Rosarno > Gambarie

Image
The last mountains before we head to Sicily for the last few stages of this giro. It's a short stage with a long climb in the end. After the climb there will be a little flat before we finish this stage.

Stage 18: Villafranca Tirrena > Piano Battaglia

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Again a mountain stage with along climb in the end. The Piano Battaglia isn't gruesome because of it's percentages but it's long distance.

Stage 19: Leonforte > Regalbuto

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The last ITT of this Giro and I placed it tactically infront of the last gruesome stage on the Etna. The riders will have the Etna in their sights for the whole day but they still have to wait another day to climb it.

Stage 20: Adrano > Linguaglossa

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A gruesome day on the Etna, a mythical mountain with multiple ascents and I used almost all of them. This stage features the lowest Cima Coppi ever as the climb which turns right just before the Rifugio Sapienza stands at 1838 meters tall. Will the Maglia Rosa prevail or will someone down in the GC rise both figuratively and litteraly from the ashes of the Etna?

Stage 21: Riposto > Catania

Image
The last stage, just a simple sprinters stage in Catania. Nothing much to win here apart from someone's dignity if they didn't win yet

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improb
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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by improb » 15/09/2019, 18:06

Here's my Giro:

maps/tours/view/11805

The start is in front of the Reggia di Venaria, a baroque former royal residency of the Savoy. Together with the city of Turin, it provides a stunning backdrop for the Giro's first stage. First week is all in the North with the first time trial (also the longest) coming on stage 4, with three stages for the climbers to make up for it. We do have stages deep in the Alps but, aside from stage 5, we tackle new and little known climbs. After stage 9, we have the first rest day. The second week starts with a hilly and short ITT, which should still see climbers bleeding time to specialists (although, they can limit their losses). Aside from that and stage 12, this week is climbers' heaven, there are several ambush stages (stage 11, 14, 15 and 16) and stage 13, the queen stage with the Cima Coppi (Blockhaus). Both the riders and the public will discover new climbs, deep in between lovely hilltop towns, which riders will learn to despise and the public will learn to love. Last week goes even deeper South, with three mountain stages and a medium mountain stage before the final parade in Catania.

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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by emmea90 » 16/09/2019, 11:19

Arnorius wrote:
13/09/2019, 11:12
almost impossible to make a nice Giro with these rules. If I conclude it that are 6 regions with hardly any big mountains that we have to have a finish in in the last week. (because it would be pointless to start in these regions and then go back to calabria in the last week)
"Almost". That's the point |rules
kanon16 wrote:
13/09/2019, 11:43
How many rest days/days racing in this Giro?
In case of 2 rest days the last week can be of 7 or more stages?..
Two rest day, evenly distributed. The last week starts on monday and ended on sunday, but you cannot do a rest day on friday of previous week
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improb
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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by improb » 18/09/2019, 2:38

emmea90 wrote:
16/09/2019, 11:19
Arnorius wrote:
13/09/2019, 11:12
almost impossible to make a nice Giro with these rules. If I conclude it that are 6 regions with hardly any big mountains that we have to have a finish in in the last week. (because it would be pointless to start in these regions and then go back to calabria in the last week)
"Almost". That's the point |rules
kanon16 wrote:
13/09/2019, 11:43
How many rest days/days racing in this Giro?
In case of 2 rest days the last week can be of 7 or more stages?..
Two rest day, evenly distributed. The last week starts on monday and ended on sunday, but you cannot do a rest day on friday of previous week
Can we have the last rest day on the last Tuesday like this year's Vuelta?

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emmea90
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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by emmea90 » 18/09/2019, 8:52

improb wrote:
18/09/2019, 2:38
emmea90 wrote:
16/09/2019, 11:19
Arnorius wrote:
13/09/2019, 11:12
almost impossible to make a nice Giro with these rules. If I conclude it that are 6 regions with hardly any big mountains that we have to have a finish in in the last week. (because it would be pointless to start in these regions and then go back to calabria in the last week)
"Almost". That's the point |rules
kanon16 wrote:
13/09/2019, 11:43
How many rest days/days racing in this Giro?
In case of 2 rest days the last week can be of 7 or more stages?..
Two rest day, evenly distributed. The last week starts on monday and ended on sunday, but you cannot do a rest day on friday of previous week
Can we have the last rest day on the last Tuesday like this year's Vuelta?
Yes
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mauro
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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by mauro » 18/09/2019, 12:36

maps/tours/view/12887

Ecco il mio percorso. Non è legato a nessun anniversario e, quindi, è un tracciato “sempreverde”, adatto per qualsiasi anno.
Non essendoci nessuna regola da seguire per la partenza, a parte il fatto che doveva essere al nord, ho scelto il capoluogo della mia provincia.
Ci sono le Dolomiti nella prima settimana ma in maniera “soft”, senza superare i 2000 metri di quota.
Entrambi i riposi sono di lunedì, il primo dopo la tappa di Farra e il secondo dopo quella di Campitello.
Per la tappa dell’Etna ho inserito la strada sterrata che conduce a 2800 metri e che vorrebbero sistemare per farci arrivare in futuro il Giro

Here is my path. It is not tied to any anniversary and, therefore, it is an "evergreen" path, suitable for any year.
Since there are no rules to follow for departure, part of the fact that it must have been to the north, I chose the capital of my province.
There are the Dolomites in the first week but in a "soft" way, without exceeding 2000 meters of altitude.
The rest day are on Monday, the first after the Farra stage and the second after the one at Campitello.
For the Etna stage I entered the dirt road that leads to 2800 meters and that they would like to fix to get us in the future the Giro

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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by sportdani19 » 19/09/2019, 22:43

Ciao Ragazzi,ho fatto questo giro a testa in giù rispechiando l'anno 2019.
Partenza da Castello di Miramare con una cronometro a squadre con arrivo a Trieste.
Cima coppi Passo dello Stelvio.
Tappa 10: Cronometro del Vino (Monferrato)
3 arrivi in Montagna nel sud italia come richiesto:
Campitello Matese, Mercovigliano di Montevergine e Potenza.
L'ultima tappa é una cronometro con partenza dallo Stadio San Nicola di Bari e l'arrivo in centro a Bari

Hi Guys, I made this Giro upside down by back this year,2019.
Departure is from Castello di Miramare with a TTT with arrive in Trieste.
Cima coppi: Stelvio Pass.
Stage 10: Wine ITT (Monferrato)
3 mountain arrivals in southern Italy as required:
Campitello matese, Montevergine of Montevergine and Potenza.
The last stage is a ITT, Depart from Bari Stadium San Nicola and the Arrive is in the centre of Bari

maps/tours/view/12872
Sportdani

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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by ellvey » 21/09/2019, 16:06

Hello! So here's my route.

maps/tours/view/12960

I placed the Big Start in Friuli, starting from Trieste with a short TT, and using gravel roads on the 3rd stage (an idea inspired by this year's Adriatica Ionica).
The 1st week runs through the north of Italy, and avoids the big climbs and mountain passes of the Alps and Dolomites, and thus making it an easier week, with several opportunities for the sprinters, a couple of hilly and/or medium mountain stages, and a hard mountain stage in the Northern Appennines. After the rest day in Viterbo, the riders face a much tougher 2nd week in the Central regions of Italy, which offers opportunities for any kind of rider and includes stages that can potentially be used for ambushes. The big headliners though, are the long TT around Teramo and the finish at the top of the fearsome Blockhaus (Cima Coppi). The 3rd week goes further south, starting in Puglia and has 2 mountain stages using little known climbs in the regions of Basilicata and Calabria, before the big finish in Sicilia, with a short explosive stage around the Etna and ending with a flat TT in Catania.
Last edited by ellvey on 22/09/2019, 13:11, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by kanon16 » 21/09/2019, 17:00

Here my Giro Upside Down, from TORINO to NAPOLI!
maps/tours/view/12918

I've thought of a path that touched as many regions as possible, ending in southern Italy.
- 3457 Km
- 16 of 20 Regions crossed (staying out only the Islands Sicilia and Sardegna, the Valle d'Aosta and the Friuli)
- 6 High-Mountain Stages: only 2 on the Alps, 1 in the North of Appennines between Tuscany and Emilia, 2 in the center of Italy e 1 in the south between Basilicata and Calabria
- 5 Medium Mountain Stages
- 8 Flat Stages
- 2 ITT

2 rest days, one after stage 7 and the other after stage 14 (7+7+7)
I know that the custom of rest days is different in the last years (for audience needs on weekends) but the balance of my race and the transfers seems good and I don't think I am going against any rule... And Gianni Bugno phoned me from Union to tell that the 5 hours-transfer between Rimini and Bari is best done before the rest day! 😅😉😉😉

Stage 1: Torino > Torino - Piazza Vittorio Veneto: 16.37 Km - ITT ***
Not a Prologue but a real ITT: 16 Km with one short but not easy climb to test the leg of the bigs and produce some difference in ranking.
Image


Stage 2: Torino - Stupinigi > Acqui Terme: 174.98 Km - FLAT **
First chance for sprinters, the pretty hills around Alba and Monferrato, lands of exellent wines are 50 Km far away from the arrival.
Image


Stage 3: Acqui Terme > Sestri Levante: 164.31 Km - FLAT **
The stages along the coast of Liguria are never totally flat and this is not exception: from Recco to Chiavari there are two categorized climbs but I think that the teams could organized themselves to keep the fugitives under control.
Image


Stage 4: Sestri Levante > Lerici: 170.07 Km - MIDDLE MOUNTAIN ***
Middle Mountain stage with 4 categorized climbs and 3000 m of ascent; a little group of riders could arrive to Lerici and the bigs will have to be very careful.
The most difficult climbs is Monte Zuccone, with maximum slope around 14%, quite far away from the arrival.
The last 20 Kilometers are very curvy and on narrow roads, with amazing views of the coast.
Image


Stage 5: Forte dei Marmi > Grosseto: 224.40 Km - FLAT *
Long but completely flat stage, from Liguria to Toscana, passing through Viareggio, Pisa, Livorno and Follonica.
Day for sprintes, the only problem could be the wind along the coast.
Image


Stage 6: Grosseto > Siena (Strade Bianche): 189.69 Km - MIDDLE MOUNTAIN ****
Maybe the most demanding stage of the first week.
The race in the second part follows the roads of the Strade Bianche, the beautiful classical race that takes place on stretches of dirt roads around Siena.
Here there are 5 sectors (against the 11 of the full Strade Bianche) for more than 40 Kilometers, up and down on the green Tuscany hills.
The arrival is, of course, in the iconic Piazza del Campo in Siena, after the steep ascent on cobbles by Via S. Caterina.
Image


Stage 7: Castelfiorentino > Passo di Croce Arcana: 138.26 Km - HIGH MOUNTAIN ***
Last day of the first week and first uphill finish of the Giro, in a short stage with only two short Cotes before the final ascent that is not super hard but enough to show the shape of the best riders.
The Passo di Croce Arcana divides Toscana from Emilia Romagna and the view of the peaks of the Appennines from over there is amazing.
The last two kilometers are a dirt road that could be arranged and compacted as for the Colle delle Finestre or Plan de Corones (Giro d'Italia 2008).
Otherwise the arrival could be at Doganaccia (1480 m)
Image


REST DAY 1


Stage 8: Maranello > Cremona: 167.33 Km - FLAT *
New chance for the sprinters in a very flar stage from Maranello (in front of the Ferrari Factory) to Cremona, the city of the Torrazzo end the violins in the Center of the Pianura Padana.
Image


Stage 9: Cremona > Rovereto - Ossario di Castel Dante: 195.57 Km - MIDDLE MOUNTAIN ***
Appetizer before the Dolomites: after covering the entire East Coast of the Lago di Garda, the last 40 Kilometers are quite demanding with 3 climbs.
The arrival is in front of the Monument of Castel Dante (for the fallen of the IWW), above the city of Rovereto.
Image


Stage 10: San Michele all'Adige > Riva di Tures: 204.37 Km HIGH MOUNTAIN *****
The Queen stage of the Giro arrives quite early: 204 Km and more than 5000 m of ascent on the Dolomites with a uphill finish at Riva di Tures, new for the Pink Race.
The Cima Coppi is Passo Gardena and the sequence of hard climbs of Passo Furcia and Valico di Riomolino was already done in Giro d'Italia 1997.
Image


Stage 11: Brunico > Fiera di Primiero: 160.00 Km HIGH MOUNTAIN ****
After the deadly stage in Riva di Tures, an other dolomitic up and down day!
Only 160 Kilometers, but there are the demanding Cibiana and Duran Pass before the last easer two climbs and the downhill towards Fiera di Primiero.
The total ascent of the stage is about 3600 m: it could be a spectacular stage if a big decided to attack on the first ascents!
Image


Stage 12: Feltre > Jesolo - Punta Sabbioni: 164.52 Km FLAT *
The Montello is the only difficulty of the stage; flat trip for sprinters until the Venetian Lagoon.
Image


Stage 13: Chioggia > Cesena: 200.15 Km FLAT **
Quite strange stage, totally flat for 140 kilometers then hilly around Cesena.
Probably some sprinters cannot pass easily the Monte Cavallo or the ascent towards Bertinoro (max 11%) but a large group could however fight for victory in Cesena, even because there are 13 kilometers after the last climb.
Image


Stage 14: Rimini > Rimini: 44.25 Km ITT *****
Very demanding ITT that could change totally the general ranking.
First 20 kilometers for real specialists: wide straight roads constantly on a slight slope.
Then, brutally, the steep ascent towards Verucchio, the downhill and the last section totally different, curvy and on narrower roads until Rimini.
Image


REST DAY 2


Stage 15: Bari > Lido di Metaponto: 190.87 Km MIDDLE MOUNTAIN **
Hilly stage suitable for breakaways: the race crosses the Murge (large plateau in the center of Puglia) and the nice villages of Acquaviva, Cassano, Gravina and Altamura, then arrives in Basilicata.
After the amazing Matera (through the old city and the typical "Sassi") there are two climbs, the second (Pisticci) more demanding and at the end of a panoramic road.
Image


Stage 16: Policoro > Laino Borgo: 157.59 Km HIGH MOUNTAIN ****
3500 m of ascent between Basilicata and Calabria.
There are beautiful and unknown climbs in south of Italy, in this stage the first is Colobraro, a large and panoramic road that reaches 18% of slope just at the end and an average of 10,7% on 5 Km,1!
The second half of the stage develops around the Mount Pollino Group, in wonderful and desolate lands such as the Colle dell'Abete, before Piano di Ruggio and close to Rifugio Visitone.
Before the arrival in the small village of Laino Borgo the last difficulty is the ascent of San Sebastiano, very steep in the first kilometer (12% max).
Image


Stage 17: Tito > Manfredonia: 181.60 Km FLAT *
Surely a breakaway will starts on the first asperities of the stages, but the teams of the sprinters will have a lot of time to bridge the gap after Rionero in Vulture and before Manfredonia.
Image


Stage 18: Lesina > Blockhaus (Majelletta): 226.51 Km HIGH MOUNTAIN ****
The longest stage of the Giro, with almost 3500 m of ascent, starts from Puglia and finish on the Majella Group, in Abruzzo.
The last 100 Kilometers are very demanding and spectacular, with meny views on the Monte Amaro (2793 m) that is the highest peak of the group.
In particular the road towards Passo San Leonardo is not very difficult but really panoramic.
The mytical Blockhaus from Roccamorice is a very hard climb of 13 Kilometers, maybe the most difficult uphill arrival of this Giro d'Italia.
Image


Stage 19: Giulianova > Forca di Presta: 189.53 Km HIGH MOUNTAIN *****
The last High Mountain stage (almost 4500 m of ascent) is a great ring of the Sibillini Mountains National Park, between Umbria and Marche, with few plain and many steep climbs.
The Sassotetto from Callarella is the most difficult ascent of the day (the first 7 Kilometers are always over 10% with a maximum of 18%) and it starts 88 Kilometers from the arrival!
The view from the top is wonderful as well as that of the Castelluccio Plain (hit by the 2016 Earthquake) towards the finish line at Forca di Presta.
Image


Stage 20: Antrodoco > Capracotta: 170.83 Km MIDDLE MOUNTAIN ***
The last day that could change the ranking is a middle-mountain stage from Lazio to Molise.
170 Kilometers up and down on the Appennino: no steep climbs, but a total ascent of 3000 m.
In particular the last 60 Kilometers are suitable for attacks, with curvy road and a difficult downhill towards Ateleta before the last climb.
Capracotta is a little village famous for the meters of snow in winter; the road (11 Km) has a medium slope of 5,5%, nothing of impossible but the last Kilometer is 8,5% and after the previous labors could be decisive.
Image


Stage 21: Isernia > Napoli: 126.56 Km FLAT *
Final stage for sprinter on the Lungomare Caracciolo in Napoli, with the view of Castel dell'Ovo and the Vesuvio behind the finish line.
The ascent of Marechiaro over Posillipo (1,5 Km at 5,1%) adds some suspense to the final 7 flat Kilometers.
Image
Last edited by kanon16 on 23/09/2019, 3:25, edited 2 times in total.

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chuimiento
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Re: Contest #6 - Giro Upside Down

Post by chuimiento » Yesterday, 15:32

Here is my Giro upside down.

maps/tours/view/12880

It goes from Torino to Napoli. The route tries to do a real ring around continental Italy, starting in Torino as it's a big city, placed in the North, and located at the West, so the race can go the the East to drop down from the Adriatic coast completing succesfully the lap to Italy without crossing and featuring different areas. 11 regions are featured: Piamonte, Lombardia, Veneto, Emilia Romagna, Marche, Abruzzo (L'Aquila), Molise (Campobasso ITT), Puglia (Candela and Taranto stages), Calabria (Crotone, Zervò, Reggio di Calabria and Castrovillari stages, being this last one in the 3rd week), Basilicata (Lago Sirino) and Campania (Moio della Civitella, Lago Laceno, Torre del Greco, Napoli). Also, there are 3 high mountain stages in the last week (Moio della Civitella, Lago Sirino and Lago Laceno).

The great starts takes place in Torino, with an urban TTT the first day and the start of the second stage near the city. The first week features the Padanian plain, with plain stages and a couple of hilly routes, and then goes southwards following the Adriatic coast, with the first tough finishes at the end of the week. The first rest day is placed after stage 9, with the transfer from L'Aquila to Campobasso. The second week continues with this trend, going southwards and following the Ionian coast of southern Italy towards the end of continental Italy: Reggio di Calabria, which hosts the queen stage just after the second rest day. This second rest day transfer the riders from Reggio to Cosenza, where the third week starting and going back northwards, but this time following the eastern Tirrenian coast and featuring the southern Appeninos towards the final stages near Napoli.

Stages down:
Spoiler!

Stage 1 - Torino - Torino
Torino > Torino: 24.08 Km Team time trial

The first stage of this Giro is a short Team Time Trial through the streets of Torino. The route is completely plain, crossing big, straight avenues, where the teams will reach high speeds. Teams with good time trial abilty will make some gaps, around 20-30 seconds, in frnot of more climber-focused ones. The Allianz Stadium will host the start and finish of the race in a spectacular display of media, team presentations and other spectacles, and the route will cross some of the most important attractions of the city of Torino.

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Stage 2 - Settimo Torinese - Milano (San Siro)
Settimo Torinese > Milano (San Siro): 155.78 Km Plain

The second stage is a sprint stage which takes the riders from the Torino outskirts to the city of Milan, second largest of Italy. The route is fully placed on the Padanian flat, a large plain placed in north Italy based in the course of the river Po. There are not any climbs or ascents in the whole stage, whose expected ending is a mass sprint without any changes in the general classification. The only difficulty of the route might be the wind as sometimes there are long straights wothout trees, where the wind can be strong. The route crosses some towns and small cities of Piamonte and Lombardy, and finishes after a turn in central Milano, being the last 15 kilometres placed around the city. The stage finishes in front of San Siro stadium, in a large space prepared for the stage finish. Maybe some sprinter could earn some seconds because of the bonifications, approaching the leadership.

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Stage 3 - Monza (Autodromo Nazionale) - Brescia
Monza (Autodromo Nazionale) > Brescia: 167.58 Km Plain

The third stage of this Giro takes the riders from Monza, a city near Milano, to the lombard city of Brescia. The route is again completely plain, with the exception of a smooth hill at kilometre 70, which will grant the first KOM jersey. The wind could be the only difficulty in a stage expected to finish in a mass sprint. The last 20 kilometres are slightly upwards and the finish line is settled in a sustained 1% slope, which could kinda change the type of sprint, favouring not as pure sprinters. The stage starts in the famous Monza Formula 1 circuit, one of the most importante race circuits in the world, and the route goes around the whole region of Lombardy, showing the characteristical Padanian flat landscape and visiting important cities such as Cremona or Brescia itself.

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Stage 4 - Rezzato - Mazzurega
Rezzato > Mazzurega: 161.45 Km Medium Mountain

The fourth stage features the first climbs of this Giro, in a stage which links the city of Rezzato, in the outskirts of Brescia, to the hill top finish of Mazzurega, a small town placed in the first hillsides of the Alps. The first part of the stage -which covers the first 120 kilometres of the stage- is, as usual, completely plain, and goes through the Padanian plain crossing some cities, such as Mantova. At the half of the stage, the route turns northwards towards Verona, leaving Lombardy and entering the Veneto region, where the finish line is placed. After Verona, the last hilly 40 kilometres take start with three punctuable climbs: the first one (Fane) is the longest, with a long approach at a sustained 2-3% and with the climb itself around 6 kilometres at 6% average. After it, a long descent takes the riders to the two final climbs, really similar each other: both 3rd category and rounding the 6% average. The last climb features 4,5 kilometres at almost 6% average, being a medium difficulty climb. This stage is perfect either for a large early breakaway or late attacks by puncheurs, as the GC contenders won't probably involve themselves very much, being the first stage with difficulties and not being really demanding.

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Stage 5 - Verona - Padova
Verona > Padova: 142.80 Km Medium Mountain

The fifth stage of this Giro goes from the city of Verona to Padova, being placed entirely in the region of Veneto, and linking two of the main cities in the region and northern Italy. The stage is a short, medium mountain stage with a section full of short but steep climbs between the kilometres 60 and 120 of the stage. The first part is completely flat as the riders leave the city of Verona. After it, the middle section, of 60 km long, features 7 linked climbs, four of them 3rd category and three 2nd category. Almost all the climbs are wall-type: short but steep hills, around 2 km lenght each and around 9-10% average slope. The succession of these climbs will make the race very hard and definitely impossible to control, favouring a breakaway with strong riders. Nonetheless, the last 20 kilometres are again completely plain, making this flat part key for the results of the stage. The tactics game could favour some GC contenders to move in order to profit this flat ending and early action might be seen. However, a fight for the GC is not expected and the most possible scenario is a large breakaway of strong puncheurs, breaking into tiny groups along the climbs are surpassed.

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Stage 6 - Venezia - Ravenna
Venezia > Ravenna: 221.97 Km Plain

Wind! The sixth stage don't have literally any slope out of 0%, being the most flat stage of the whole Giro. Also, its length is above 220 kilometres, being an incredibly long stage between Venezia -starting the stage from the main island-, capital city of Veneto region, and finishing in Ravenna, one of the main cities of Emilia Romagna. The Po delta hosts the stage, and the majority of the route follows the Adriatic sea coast. The expected ending is a mass sprint but echelons are a real threat, and a clever team might take great benefits from this stage.

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Stage 7 - Forlì - Civitanova Marche
Forlì > Civitanova Marche: 199.25 Km Plain

The seventh stage of the Giro continues the north-south path started by its previous stage in a flat stage between the cities of Forlì, in Emilia Romagna, and Civitanova Marche, in the homonym region. The stage is expected to finish in a mass sprint, but there are several interesting features in the race. At first, the route is always following the coastline, featuring long and exposed straights in which the wind could have a role. Also, there are two hilly sections: Monte Bartolo area near Pesaro, between kilometres 70 and 90, and Monte Conero area after Ancona, between kilometres 155 and 175, and only 30 kilometres before the finish line. This difficulties could encourage some riders to try to break the race into several groups, along with echelons.

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Stage 8 - Porto Sant'Elpidio - Monte Prata
Porto Sant'Elpidio > Monte Prata: 133.63 Km High mountain

The first mountain top finish of the Giro is the interesting climb of Monte Prata. This short stage is completely placed in the Marche region, but its finish line is pretty near from the border with the region of Umbria. The route starts in the coastal town of Porto Sant'Elpidio and goes on with a loop around the sea to, then, leave it, following the course of the river Chienti. For more than 100 kilometres the road follows a smooth but constant ascent, progresivelly increasing, which will produce unexpected fatigue for the riders, who, thinking the stage is easier as it features only one climb at the end, could be surprised by the accumulated ascent. The last climb has an approach of around 10 kilometres and starts effectively after the town of Castelsantangelo sul Nera. The climb, although it marks 11,54 km at 7,95% average, is not constant, as it has some rests and some really steep sections. Specially hard are the first 4 kilometres of real ascension (averaging 9%) and the last 1,5 kilometres, above 10%. First test for the GC contenders, who will probably move in the last kilometres after some teamwork in the four starting kilometres. The stage victory will be probably in a large early breakaway or maybe in between the favourites, as the stage doesn't feature more climbs than the finishing one.

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Stage 9 - Ascoli Piceno - L'Aquila
Ascoli Piceno > L'Aquila: 195.07 Km High mountain

The last stage of the first week takes the riders from the city of Ascoli Piceno to the capital city of Abruzzos region L'Aquila. As well as the former stage, this route features only one major climb, 1st category Vado di Sole, which, in contrast to the mountain finish of Monte Prata, is a long and more smooth climb. The first half of the stage, until kilometre 120, goes southwards between the Adriatic sea and the Appeninos, in a wavy but smooth area, with five smooth punctuable climbs and constant ups and downs. After it, the main difficulty of the journey starts: Vado di Sole, with 20 kilometres at more than 6% average. This climb doesn't feature high slopes but is pretty constant and hassome kilometres above 10%. After the summit is reached, there isn't any descent but a false flat terrain of around 20 kilometres, until the summit of Valico di Monto Cristo, which follows with the descent itself, also 20 kilometres long, towards the finish line. The last 5 kilometres include a smooth hill and a sligthly downwards finish. The long distance between Vado di Sole might discourage the GC contenders to move, favouring a large break, but, if gaps are made in the climb, the last 40 kilometres with the false flat at high altitude, the long descent and the wavy last kilometres, could produce a thrilling chase between small groups, with time gaps at the end.

This stage also has an interesting feature: it has one of lowest-ever Cima Coppi, at just 1767 metres altitude. This is due to this Giro doesn't featuring the Alps and being held completely in Appeninos. It isn't either a great ascension but a 4th category ascent as the race comes from a false flat, making it one of the weirdest Cima Coppi ever.

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****REST DAY****

Stage 10 - Campobasso - Campobasso
Campobasso > Campobasso: 27.51 Km Individual Time Trial

The first individual time trial of the race is placed just after the first rest day, which will take the riders from L'Aquila to the Molise region. The TT, indeed, has its start and finish in the capital city and most populated of the whole region, Campobasso. Although this TT is not specially long (only 27 kilometres) it shows a wavy profile in a hilly environment. It has three different sections: the first 13 kilometres are a long and fast descent, in a wide road, where the riders will reach high speeds and gaps will be low. After it, the main difficulty of the journey, the climb to Oratino, will rise up the riders for the next 5 kilometres, with a respectable average above 7%, giving this time trial a taste of CTT. This part is probably the most important one, where climbers might avoid greater loses of time through a special effort. The last 9 kilometres feature a false flat with downwards motion for the first 6 kilometres and slighly upwards for the last 4 kilometres. The accumulated fatigue and the wavy but mostly flat profile makes this part the most dangerous in terms of great gaps, and good time trialists could benefit highly from this. A great stage to continue giving shape to the GC.

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Stage 11 - Foggia - Candela
Foggia > Candela: 230.05 Km Medium Mountain

The eleventh stage is a brutal Liège-type stage in the hills located in the borders between Puglia and Campania regions. It is also the longest stage of this Giro, beyond the 230 kilometres mark. The stage starts in Foggia, one of the main important cities of south Italy and Puglia region itself. Although the first 30 kilometres are fairly plain, with only a slight upwards motion as the route goes to this hilly area, the action does start at kilometre 30 and won't stop until the riders reach the finish line. A number of no more than sixteen punctuable climbs are waiting for the peloton. All of them are categorised 3rd and 4th category, and neither of them are longer than 7 kilometres, being the majority of them around 2 or three kilometres, but the succession of climbs, the high slopes of some of them and the length of the stage might mean that big surprises could come. At first, the three first climbs are 4th category, smooth ones, but the fourth and fifth Greci and Folice do feature high slopes and will be the first great difficulty of the journey. After them, the three climbs of Tressanti and the double climb to Melito Irpino (with the last one above 9% average slope) are waiting, followed by 10 fairly flat kilometres in the only rest area of the stage, where the route rest is located. After it, there won't be any more easiness as six climbs are linked each other, with special attention to Contrada Ciarulo, Trevico and Santa Lucia, three walls with huge slopes (Trevico is above 10% average). Finally, Sant'Agata di Puglia is the last long climb where late long-range attacks are expected, and final wall of Candela, although it's short, has over 14% slopes to define the final winner of the stage.

A stage with taste of classic where everything can happen. The race is almost impossible to control, so an early breakaway might grow its advantage up to huge gaps at the end, recueing some rider to the GC or widening the current advantages. Maybe the race could break into tiny groups, forced to mantain a hrilling chase until the finish line, or maybe even GC contenders could start to attack, either early or late in the race, and the accumulated fatigue of 230 km, make some big gaps between the, in a stage without long and high mountains, favouring a different kind of rider.

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Stage 12 - Cerignola - Taranto
Cerignola > Taranto: 189.87 Km Plain

Finally, the calm after the storm. This is the first of two plain, transition stages in the journey of this Giro towards South Italy. The route crosses Puglia region from north to south, starting in the town of Cerignola and finishing in Taranto, one of the most importants of the area, which gives name to the large Gulf located in the south of the Italian peninsula. The stage is not completely plain as first week's as it currently passes near some hills, but slopes are always smooth, avoiding wind and decreasing the difficulty of the stage. Also, the last 20 kilometres are actually completely plain and near the sea, preceded by a fast descent towards the litoral flat. Journey for sprinters, unless a break might take benefits from the accumulated fatigue of the previous journeys.

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Stage 13 - Policoro - Crotone
Policoro > Crotone: 183.14 Km Plain

The second flat stage of this travel southwards is fairly different from the previous one. This time, the stage, starting in Policoro (Basilicata) follows the Ionian coast all the time, approaching Calabria, where the finish line is placed at the city of Crotone. The route is completely plain and is located in the shore, so wind could blow favouring echelons. Also, the fatigue will be high and the GC contenders shall prepare themselves for the Calabrian mountainous dyptich for the weekend. A good day for a mass sprint or for an early break to score a stage victory.

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Stage 14 - Catanzaro Lido - Crocifisso di Zervò
Catanzaro Lido > Crocifisso di Zervò: 198.24 Km High mountain

The first stage of the Calabrian dyptic starts, with increasing difficulty and being the first stage with several 1st category climbs: this time, three of them. Probably one of the decisive stages for the GC resolution. The route goes from the coastal area of Catanzaro, nearly 10 kilometres to the city center, placed upon a hill in the inland of Calabria. The first 70 kilometres are completely flat, following the Ionic coast, at the seaside, and then the riders will face the first difficulty of the journey: Valico di Cassari, placed exactly in the middle of the stage, with more than 16 kilometres at 6,55% average, will be the first test for teams and riders. Probably definitive moves won't be seen as it is far from the finish, but the tactical games could start, sending teammates to the break and so on. The flat first kilometres will also make a role in this break issue as different types of riders will be favoured depending in which terrain the break is allowed. After the summit of Cassari is reached, a long descent over 30 kilometres is followed, and a short flat section of nearly 20 kilometres starts as the stage crosses the coastal towns of Siderno and Locri. This shall be the last flat time for the riders. After it, the main dish of the journey starts: an absolute monster named Ostello waits for the riders. The climb itself, excluding the approach kilometres and a small ascent after the KOM, doesn't reach 8 kilometres, but its average slope is over 10% (10,3% indeed) and the hardest whole kilometres are above 13% average. In addition to this, the summit is reached when 40 kilometres of stage are still waiting for the riders. An early move in the hardest slopes of Ostello could explode the race into a thousand pieces, and the hardness of the ascent allows a one-by-one resolution with 40 kilometres of action still waiting. A fast and short descent takes the riders again to the downhills, and, after 1º0 kilometres of false flats, the last ascension starts. Thus, it's not as hard as the previous one, but it's long: 17 kilometres at 5,37% average. If the race has moved in Ostello, this last climb might be epic, watching incredible chases between the favourites. If they are all together, this last climb is not a good terrain to drop other riders and a small group could make it to the finish line. The stage finishes at Crocifisso di Zervò, a cross placed as a memorial of the events which took place in this places during World War II.

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Stage 15 - Reggio di Calabria - Reggio di Calabria
Reggio di Calabria > Reggio di Calabria: 215.35 Km High mountain

Finally, the monster Queen Stage is here. The second's week last day, and just before the last rest day on Monday, the hardest stage of the whole Giro is waiting for the riders in the surroundings of Reggio di Calabria. The start/finish line is placed in the same place, in front of Messina strait, just in the end of peninsular Italy, at the core of the main city of Calabria, Reggio di Calabria, which will be the main host of the stage, watching the riders at every mountain-coast loop they'll describe in the route. Actually, the philosophy of the route is in some way a loop centered in the city of Reggio as the descent point and the Aspromonte, mountain range placed just in front of the city, as the ascent point. The peloton will climb this mountains up to four times, with progresivelly increasing difficulty and using four different roads of the multiple ways which link Reggio with the Aspromonte. The first of them, Cardeto Sud, is the shortest, but the one with more constant slopes and the highest average (6%). The climbs of the journey are not specially steep but its length and its succession shall make a really hard stage. This first climb would be good for some early break attempts and some team strategy. After it, a long descent and a few plain kilometres are followed by the Lago Rumia climb: longer but with smoother slopes. This second climb will add fatigue to the legs of the riders. After it, another long descent and, after a few kilometres side to side with the coast, the third ascent to Aspromonte takes place. This one is the longest one of the stage, over 25 kilometres of ascension, though the slopes are not very hard as there are some rests in the middle of the climb, Finally, after a 30 km long descent, the last climb starts without any flat. This last climb, with 23 kilometres at nearly 5,5% average, has a specially steep section at the first kilometres, and the final ones are smoothening as the altitude increases. The chain of this last two climbs offer some options for the GC battle, with early moves in the first one, trying to benefit from the descents, an early attack in the hard kilometres of last climb, or, more probably, an elimination game with progressive drops as the fatigue affects the riders. The last descent is also very important, as the summit is reached at 20 kilometres to the finish, which are all downwards in a fast approach to the finish line in Reggio, just in front of the sea. An epic stage where big gaps and a lot of action is expected.

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****REST DAY****

Stage 16 - Cosenza - Castrovillari
Cosenza > Castrovillari: 113.43 Km Plain

After the rest day, the shortest stage of this Giro will take the riders from Cosenza to Castrovillari. All the route, which is pretty simple, is placed in Calabria. The last difficulty of the stage, Valico di Campotenese at nearly 20 kilometres to the finish line is the only place where the mass sprint could be avoided through some attacks or movement in the race. Also, an early break could make it due to the general fatigue.

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Stage 17 - Mormanno - Lago Sirino
Mormanno > Lago Sirino: 170.51 Km High mountain

The first stage of the final mountain tryptique links the towns of Mormanno and the natural landscape of Lago Sirino. It's located almost completely in the Basilicata region, where the finish line belongs to, apart from a few kilometres in Calabria (the first of the route). This stage does not feature monster climbs and isn't specially long -nor short either- but it is full of ups and downs and its terrain allows smoe long range attacks and a good tactical approach might make great results in terms of gaps and GC fight. The most difficult climb of the journey is the first one, Colle Ruggio, with more than 11 kilometres above 8,5% average, it starts at kilometre 10 of the stage and its peak is reached in the kilometre 21. Ground for break attempts and favourable to a strong, large break with some GC teammates and a first tactical approach to the whole stage. After it, a long 40-km long descent will calm the race and stabilize the situation. After it, the race places at kilometre 60, where another wavy 60 kilometres will follow, with two 2nd category climbs, the first of them short and steep and the second one long and smooth, followed by their respective descents and a false-flat towards the final section of the stage. This second part is perfect for the break to increase their advantage and take time to the peloton. Finally, the two final climbs link will be decisive for the stage: at first, the Monte Sirino climb, which is clearly longer and with more entity, will be finished at 40 to go, but a 30 kilometre descent goes after, so early moves could be seen here as the last climb is maybe not enough to make big gaps. This last ascent, Valico di Cammartino, is only 5 kilometres long, but it is fairly steep, with almost 8% average and one whole kilometre above 10%. The finish line is not just at the end of the climb as there are 5 more added false-flat kilometres in which thilling chases between the GC riders could be featured, and higher gaps than expected could fall in this ending.

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Stage 18 - Sapri - Moio della Civitella
Sapri > Moio della Civitella: 129.67 Km High mountain

The second stage of the final mountain tryptique is a short and nervous stage from Sapri to Moio della Civitella, two towns placed in south Campania, region in which the whole stage takes place and hosts the final stages of this Giro. Although the stage is shorter than 130 kilometres, there aren't any flat terrain excepting the first 10 kilometres, fact that will provide action during the whole stage. This first kilometres are flat and side to side with the Tirrenian Sea, and when the race goes inside the action begins. The first climb, Bosco, is short but pretty steep, and some fireworks could start in shape of tactical game and teammates trying to get into the break. After it, more smooth ups and downs follow. After kilometres 50, the main difficulties of the journey begin: three climbs (2nd, 1st and 1st category) with pretty high slopes and without any plain between them. The two first of these climbs (Campestrino and Croce di Pruno) will be a test for GC contenders and the last, monster climb to Monte Calvello (7 kilometres at almost 9% average) will be host of the GC moves. Also, the summit is placed at 20 kilometres to go, so the descent and the final 10 kilometres with a smooth hill -ascent and descent- will make a role as leaders will be isolated and probably broken into small groups, and the final smooth terrain might increase dramatically the small gaps taken from the climbs, depending of the tactics, teammates available and other factors.

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Stage 19 - Agropoli - Lago Laceno
Agropoli > Lago Laceno: 206.62 Km High mountain

This nineteenth stage is the last opportunity for climbers to get any advantage in the GC battle, and Napoli is just waiting as only three days are left to end the race. The race continues crossing Campania region and going gradually northwards, following the Tirrenian coast. This last mountain stage is located in the mountains located just at the east of the Napolean plain, where also the Vesuvio stands, scenario that will host the final stages of this stage race. This last mountain stage, just opposite from the previous one, is long -above 200 kilometres- although it features also several climbs and almost zero flat between them in an interesting terrain. The first 60 kilometres, nonetheless, are completely flat as the race follows the Tirrenian coast, near to the city of Salerno, which the race won't cross as they detour eastwards to Battipaglia and Giffoni Valle Piana, where the mountains do begin. The first major climb of the journey, Valico della Carbonara, is long and smooth, and features a good terrain for a formation of a break, unless it has formed formerly during the plain section. The place where the break forms will determine in some ways the race, as some types of riders will be capable of making it into the break changing tactics. After the Carbonara climb and its descent, long and more smooth even Monte Terminio follows, and, after it, a wavy terrain with long descents and minor climbs, The most important part of the stage starts with 40 kilometres to go, This is the placement of Muro di Conza, a short but highly steep climbs (around 10% average) where some early moves are expected as it's the last opportunity to take advantage. After it, not a real descent but a false flat terrain follows, contributing to encourage this early attacks as, with the adequate tactical approach, a big gap could come out. The final climb, Valico di Lago Laceno, is long but smooth again, and it'll be difficult to drop riders. The summit doesn't mean the stage is finished: last 8 kilometres with a fast descent and some flat terrain could be decisive to struggle for that seconds that could swap the whole race, in an outstanding landscape, completing one lap to the lakeside before the finish line waits for the riders.

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Stage 20 - Torre del Greco - Torre del Greco
Torre del Greco > Torre del Greco: 45.62 Km Individual Time Trial

An individual effort will give the GC the final shape, waiting, of course, to the last stage, which is not at all a piece of cake and changes could be made, specially if there are some contenders in a range of a few seconds. This final time trial is claerly longer than the previous ones, but it's completely flat, favouring time triallists to make big gaps and recover some time lost at the mountains. As it's the penultimate stage fatigue will be high and strong riders with good recover capacity will be favoured by this TT, located at the outskirts of Napoli, a highly populated area between the coast and the Vesuvio volcano. The riders will cross famous placed such as the ancient city of Pompei and Ercolano, in a famous and beautiful landscape, with the Tirrenian sea, the city of Napoli being seen far away, looking as the final boss of the race, and the mighty Vesuvio opening up at the side of the riders.

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Stage 21 - Casoria - Napoli
Casoria > Napoli: 167.19 Km Medium Mountain

Finally, the last walk of this Giro arrives! The host of the final podium of the race will be the city of Napoli, third largest of Italy and one of the most important population areas all over the contry. This last stage is not the usual triumphal walk as we are used to at Tour de France or Vuelta but a tricky and demanding classic-type stage. The first 50 kilometres go through the near cities of Napoli, climbing the long and smooth Camaldoli. In this path, the riders will go westwards looking for the coast, which they'll reach at the environment of lake Lago del Fusaro, near the Campi Flegrei (volcanic fields) and the cape which ends the Gulf of Napoli and links with the islands of Procida and Ischia. In this location the main circuit of the stage will begin. The circuit is nearly 20 km long and features four small climbs: the smooth Monte di Procida (1,75 km at 5%) and the short but steep Monte Grillo (0,5 km at 15%) and Via Petronio (0,75 km at 10%) with the Muro di Bacoli between them (1,25 km at 8%). The sequence of this route, being repeated five times, will make the race hardes and allow some attacks of puncheurs or maybe even GC moves, if the gaps are small enough -or even with big gaps, this terrain is perfect for some surprises as the sequence of walls makes it difficult to control. The circuit is left at nearly 20 kilometres to go, when the riders will turn fastly towards Napoli, featuring two more small climbs, long and smooth Campi Flegrei ascent and the short and explosive wall of Marechiaro, which, with its 1 km around 9% average, and being its summit at nearly 7 kilometres of the finish line, will be the final judge for the victory win, and maybe for final GC changes. A big garden near the sea at Chiaria area in Napoli will be the host of the finish line and al the prizes ceremony.

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