Contests are back: Link

Editor has still troubles with free API, if you don't want to use OSM Elevation API you can try to do a GPX on RideWithGPS site and import it on the editor

Please don't spam us mail and PMs that we won't answer and notice that the official language of forum is English.

Roadbooks: LINK

Comment with us the races in the discussion thread or in the Telegram Chat

2020 Season Contests
Contest #6 - VOTING: Link
Contest #7: Tour de France 2020 Link
Bonus Contest: The new UCI Road World Championships Link

Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Compete in the contests and become the best stagemaker!
User avatar
emmea90
Vicedirettore Sportivo di terza divisione
Vicedirettore Sportivo di terza divisione
Posts: 754
Joined: 17/05/2011, 15:47
Location: Milano
Contact:

Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by emmea90 »

Image
Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Due to Covid-19 pandemic spreading in 2020 both Giro d'Italia and Tour de France were cancelled. Vuelta also had to be postponed by 20 days.

ASO, RCS and Unipublic gets to an agreement to organize one single Grand Tour in september with parts of all the three tours.

ASO also gets to end the Grand Tour in Paris, with the classic Champs-Elysees stage. Due to this, you have to end stage 20 in a way to arrange a realistic transfer to Paris in the evening/morning after the stage (ending near an airport, an high velocity train station if in France, etc).

You have to spilt the stages during the 21 days in an equal stages, possibly avoiding big plane transfers (except for the Paris stage)

Route should be designed in respect of the UCI limit of 3500 Km for a Grand Tour.

You have also to take into account that the Grand Tour will be held in september, so you have to avoid climbs over 2500m and you have to limit climbs over 2000m at 3 maximum.

It shall be clear who organize what stage between RCS, ASO and Unipublic organizes what stage and the total shall be 7 for each organizer. It's not forbidden to go in other countries but it shall be clear who is the organizer - for example, a stage that goes into Andorra, can be organized by both ASO and Unipublic but a stage with the majority of that in Italy shall be organized only by RCS.

Please write in stage the description which is the organizer of each stage.

Please use for the Grand Tour the Tour de France 2019 profile.

Evaluation shall take into account
- Grand Tour balancing
- Realism of the transfers and the stage
- Satisfaction of the organizers
- Key stages in the weekend and not having too many "flat/sprint" stages in a row

Deadline will be on april 25, h 23.59
Software Engineer, Cycling Fanatic

User avatar
pierluca.ferretto
Spettatore
Posts: 4
Joined: 07/09/2017, 10:25

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Post by pierluca.ferretto »

There's a problem with the 7+7+7 rule.
The Tour will begin on saturday, so, starting for example in Italy, the following friday the caravan should take a plane and move to Spain, sacrificing the weekend of mountain stages. It would be more logical that in the country where you decide to start, you ran until the following Sunday and use the day off for the transfer. Also because having to end the Tour in Paris, it is inevitable to plan a long transfer between Italy and Spain or vice versa.

User avatar
kanon16
Spettatore
Posts: 37
Joined: 07/10/2016, 22:33

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Post by kanon16 »

pierluca.ferretto wrote:
04/04/2020, 16:56
There's a problem with the 7+7+7 rule.
The Tour will begin on saturday, so, starting for example in Italy, the following friday the caravan should take a plane and move to Spain, sacrificing the weekend of mountain stages. It would be more logical that in the country where you decide to start, you ran until the following Sunday and use the day off for the transfer. Also because having to end the Tour in Paris, it is inevitable to plan a long transfer between Italy and Spain or vice versa.
Hi! :beer:
"you are not required to do 7 stages in a row of the same organizer". (Message by emmea90 of 25/03)

User avatar
emmea90
Vicedirettore Sportivo di terza divisione
Vicedirettore Sportivo di terza divisione
Posts: 754
Joined: 17/05/2011, 15:47
Location: Milano
Contact:

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Post by emmea90 »

kanon16 wrote:
04/04/2020, 19:29
pierluca.ferretto wrote:
04/04/2020, 16:56
There's a problem with the 7+7+7 rule.
The Tour will begin on saturday, so, starting for example in Italy, the following friday the caravan should take a plane and move to Spain, sacrificing the weekend of mountain stages. It would be more logical that in the country where you decide to start, you ran until the following Sunday and use the day off for the transfer. Also because having to end the Tour in Paris, it is inevitable to plan a long transfer between Italy and Spain or vice versa.
Hi! :beer:
"you are not required to do 7 stages in a row of the same organizer". (Message by emmea90 of 25/03)
Exactly. It's not a problem, but it's part of the feature to make you stay near a zone in the weekend and not to have a long transfer between one zone and another one.

The only long transfer allowed is before paris.

If you start in spain, then you'll go in France, you shall make pyrenees as transition. From France to italy, Alps. And so on.

Starting in southern spain and then do a long transfer to continue in northen france is a mistake in the contest. The three sections shall be like if it's the same GT without big transfers between them.
Software Engineer, Cycling Fanatic

User avatar
jibvalverde
Appassionato
Appassionato
Posts: 84
Joined: 16/11/2017, 5:28
Contact:

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Post by jibvalverde »

Here is my Grant Tour for the contest.

maps/tours/view/14303

User avatar
pierluca.ferretto
Spettatore
Posts: 4
Joined: 07/09/2017, 10:25

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Post by pierluca.ferretto »

emmea90 wrote:
05/04/2020, 0:50
kanon16 wrote:
04/04/2020, 19:29
pierluca.ferretto wrote:
04/04/2020, 16:56
There's a problem with the 7+7+7 rule.
The Tour will begin on saturday, so, starting for example in Italy, the following friday the caravan should take a plane and move to Spain, sacrificing the weekend of mountain stages. It would be more logical that in the country where you decide to start, you ran until the following Sunday and use the day off for the transfer. Also because having to end the Tour in Paris, it is inevitable to plan a long transfer between Italy and Spain or vice versa.
Hi! :beer:
"you are not required to do 7 stages in a row of the same organizer". (Message by emmea90 of 25/03)
Exactly. It's not a problem, but it's part of the feature to make you stay near a zone in the weekend and not to have a long transfer between one zone and another one.

The only long transfer allowed is before paris.

If you start in spain, then you'll go in France, you shall make pyrenees as transition. From France to italy, Alps. And so on.

Starting in southern spain and then do a long transfer to continue in northen france is a mistake in the contest. The three sections shall be like if it's the same GT without big transfers between them.
Ok, no problem, then.. I just hope to not hear "and the south?"

User avatar
ellvey
Spettatore
Posts: 32
Joined: 31/08/2018, 16:17

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Post by ellvey »

This is my Tour maps/tours/view/14265

-Start in Porto, Portugal
-Queen Stage: Cles - Tirano (Stage 19)
-Key Climbs: Mirador de Herbeira (Stage 4), Mirador de la Fuente del Chivo (Stage 6), Col Bagargi (Stage 9), Col de Turini (Stage 13), Colle d'Esischie and Colle di Sampeyre (Stage 14), Colle di Superga (Stage 15), Passo del Mortirolo and Monte Padrio (Stage 19), Passo dell'Alpe di Neggia and Forcorella di Marzio (Stage 20)
-Time Trial: 73,85 kms
-Besides Spain, France and Italy, the Tour also visits Portugal (as it was said before) and Switzerland
-Three Climbs between 2000 and 2500m: Colle della Lombarde/Col de la Lombarde, Colle d'Esischie, Colle di Sampeyre

The Tour starts in Porto, Portugal and then goes North into the rugged terrain of Northern Spain, that provides a variety of terrain, that should keep everyone happy. In the weekend, the race enters in France, through the Pays Basque, with a long and lumpy Time Trial, and a mountain stage in the Pyrenées Atlantiques.
The second week goes through the South of France, visiting the Midi Pyrenées, Languedouc-Roussillon, Provence and ending with a mountain stage in Côte-d'Azur. This week ends already in Italy in the Piemonte, with a short but very difficult stage in the Alps and then a dangerous stage in the Hills around Torino.
The Last week stays in Italy and has a rollercoaster stage in the Appenines, a flat transitional stage, and another time trial, before facing the final pair of mountain stages in Lombardia and Switzerland. The race then heads by plain into Paris in order to finish the tour with the traditional Champs Elysées stage.
Spoiler!
Stage 1 - Porto. Foz do Douro - Porto. Aliados (Unipublic)
Image
A torch is lit, one that will follow the riders in the next 21 days, and marking the start of the Tour, beginning with a stunning prologue in the Portuguese city of Porto, following the Douro river, before facing a cobbled climb with some steep sections in the heart of the historical part of the city. The differences should be small, but the leader's jersey is up for grabs.

Stage 2 -Trofa - Valença (Unipublic)
Image
The last stage in Portugal is raced for the most part in the Minho region, and is short and flat, clearly favouring the Sprinters, with only a 4th category, that in normal circumstances wouldn't even be categorized, but they have to give the mountains jersey to someone. The last km is slightly uphill at around 2%, but it shouldn't be too much of a factor.

Stage 3 - O Porriño - Fisterra. Cabo Fisterra (Unipublic)
Image
The Tour finally enters in Spain, through Galicia, with an increase in difficulty. For the most part, it's quite easy, but they'll have to face the iconic utrasteep climb that Unipublic seems to worship right into the fanatism xD, in this case the Mirador de Ézaro, placed at around 33kms from the finish. Afterwards, they still have to face 2 4th category climbs, with the last one into the Cabo Fisterra serving as the finish. Cabo Fisterra is still sometimes reffered as "El Fín del Mundo" aka "The end of the world". This stage should end with a reduced sprint finish, but there's also opportunity for solo attacks in the last climb. And if we're extremely lucky, maybe some team will drill it up in the Ézaro climb, and thus seeing a similar result to the Calp stage last year in the Vuelta, won by Quintana.

Climbs
Image Image

Stage 4 - Camariñas - Cariño. Mirador de Herbeira (Unipublic)
Image
The longest stage of the entire Tour goes through the always ondulating terrain found in northern Galicia, and into the very scenic Rías Altas. It finishes in Mirador the Herbeira, the first 2st category climb of the race. This climb has been previously used before one time as a MTF in the Vuelta, although that year they climbed it from the more irregular south side. The north side in my opinion is actually a harder climb. This stage will make the first selection in the GC and will provide truly stunning helicopter shots of the cliffs that can be found in the region

Climbs
Image

Stage 5 - Viveiro - Avilés (Unipublic)
Image
The Tour leaves Galicia, entering in Asturias, usually associated with mountain stages in the Vuelta. However this day isn't intended for GC fights. The terrain is always up and down, but rarely steep, and should see a sprint finish on the streets of Avilés. However, due to its ondulating profile and the fact that the hardest of the climbs are in the last part of the stage, some sprinters, who either can't cope well climbs, are in a bad shape, or hurt, will struggle to keep themselves in the peloton.

Stage 6 - Nava - Alto Campoo. Mirador de la Fuente del Chivo (Unipublic)
Image
The Tour countinues to go east, leaving Asturias behind, and entering in Cantabria, for the first real high mountain stage of the race, even if they already had to face a MTF in Mirador de Herbeira. They have to climb 4 categorized climbs including two 1st categorised climbs, and having to face another obstacle in the altitude, as the final climb up to Mirador de la Fuente del Chivo almost hugs the barrier of the 2000m. None of the climbs are exceptional steep, but the last 2 are quite long. Another MTF known by the Vuelta.

Climbs
Image Image

Stage 7 - Medina de Pomar - Donostia/San Sebastián (Unipublic)
Image
Unipublic says their farewell and will pass the torch to ASO with a unremarkable stage, unless we count the titanic effort made to avoid as many of those pesky Basque climbs as possible, in order to arrive in Donostia/San Sebastián and witness a massive sprint finish. I hope the sprinters will thank me for this xD

Stage 8 - Saint-Jean-de-Luz - Espelette (ASO)
Image
ASO kindly takes the torch, and spins it around, welcoming the riders with a very important day for the GC in the lumpy roads of the French Pays Basque. This Time Trial is long, and ondulating, with a couple of short steep climbs, and a few others not as steep. These roads will certainly bring happy memories to Geraint Thomas, as it was in here that he consolidated his Tour de France win. While not as suited to the pure time trialists, this TT should still see the climbers bleed a good bit of time to the All Arounders.

Stage 9 - Bayonne - Les Chalets d'Iraty. Col Bagargi (ASO)
Image
Part 2 of ASO's welcoming party. The first week finishes with a mountain stage through the Pyrenées Atlantiques, using climbs that are the epitome of the famous stereotype saying the Pyreneean climbs are shorter, steeper, and more irregular than the Alpine climbs. Col Inharpu and Col de la Hourcère are quite hard, but the fight should be left to the last climb up to the Chalets d'Iraty, at the top of Col Bagargi. But there is enough terrain to prove me wrong.

Climbs
Image Image
Image Image

Rest Day - Saint-Gaudens

Stage 10 - Saint-Gaudens - Limoux (ASO)
Image
After the rest day, the race resumes, with another stage in the Pyrenées. However it should be more suited for breakaways, than for GC fight. The riders have to face a total of 4 categorized climbs, including a trio of 2nd Categories. A lot of riders can win a stage like this.

Climbs
Image Image
Image Image

Stage 11 - Carcassone - Frontignan (ASO)
Image
The Tour leaves temporarily the mountains behind, and enters on the flat terrain it can be found in Languedouc-Roussillon, close to the Mediterranean coast, a region known to be windy. There is a section that will particularly trouble the riders if there is sidewind, between Agde and Sète. But close to the end there is a plot twist in the form of the steep climb of Mont Saint-Clair, with its top located around 15kms from the finish. A lot of the sprinters could be in trouble in this climb. This stage has the potential to be quite important if the wind decides to invite itself to the party. Otherwise it should end on a sprint finish, probably a reduced one.

Climbs
Image

Stage 12 - Arles - Gap (ASO)
Image
The stage starts in the open plains of Camargue, and heads towards the Alps, into Gap, a very frequent host of stage finishes in the Tour de France, albeit this one is different from the traditional Gap medium mountain stage. Instead it should end on a sprint finish. I hope the sprinters will thank me again for avoiding any climbs around Gap xD

Stage 13 - Barcelonnette - Col de Turini (ASO)
Image
ASO prepares to pass the torch to RCS with one of the hardest stages in the race, ending in the Alpes Maritimes, the first of 3 consecutive important stages. The riders have to face Col de Larche, the colossus that is Colle della Lombarda, the first climb above 2000m, and the final sequence of Col de la Colmiane and the iconic Col de Turini. The fight should only happen in the last climb, however with so much climbing beforehand, the riders should arrive quite fatigued at the foot of Col de Turini.

Climbs
Image Image
Image Image

Stage 14 - Borgo San Dalmazzo - Valle Varaita. Pontechianale (RCS)
Image
RCS receives the torch, and welcomes the riders into Italy with a very important stage. In order to compensate for the slightly longer transfer between Sospel and Borgo San Dalmazzo, this stage is quite short, but the riders have to have 2 colossus, Colle d'Esischie, the highest point of the race, immediately followed by the not less impressive neighbor Colle di Sampeyre. The final climb is a long drag, on the line with the Aprica finish commonly used after climbing Passo del Mortirolo, up to Pontechianale (actually this climb corresponds to the lower slopes of the legendary Colle dell'Agnello). The GC fight could even start on the first climb.

Climbs
Image Image
Image

Stage 15 - Cuneo - Gassino Torinese (RCS)
Image
Part 2 of the RCS's welcoming party. This is a dangerous stage, inspired by the Como stage in last year's Giro, placed at the exact same spot, at the end of the 2nd week. It's raced on the hills around Torino, passing through some roads used of the Milano-Torino semi classic. The final kms are particularly tricky as they have to face the steep climbs of Colle della Maddalena and Colle di Superga, the utrasteep Muro di San Martino and a final uncategorized lump of 1km at around 6%. Gc fight is expected in this promising stage.

Climbs
Image Image
Image

Rest Day - Stradella

Stage 16 - Stradella - Castelnovo ne Monti (RCS)
Image
The 3rd week starts with a hilly stage in Emilia-Romagna, and in the Appenines. For a long part of the stage, it's flat, before turning south, towards a rollercoaster terrain with a lot of up and down, and facing several categorized climbs. It should be a stage for a breakway, but there is the possibility of some GC action, due to the fact that the last climbs are very close to the finish.

Climbs
Image Image
Image

Stage 17 - Reggio nell'Emilia - Trento (RCS)
Image
The eye of the storm. This stage goes north, crossing the Po basin, and heading towards the heart of the Alps, finishing in Trentino, on its largest city, Trento. It clearly favours the sprinters, but can a breakaway steal a famous win against a hungry, but tired, sluggish peloton?

Stage 18 - Mezzolombardo - Cles (RCS)
Image
The race enters on its final tryptic of crucial stages, starting with a time trial, that goes through steps, first with a flat section, then facing a climb to Mollaro, then flat again, followed by a short steep climb, ending with another flat section that leads into Cles. This is the last opportunity for the All arounders to put some time into the pure climbers, before the final 2 mountainous stages. Could we call this TT the "Stairway to Heaven"? xDD

Stage 19 - Cles - Tirano (RCS)
Image
The peloton has to bow before the Queen Stage! If the TT is nicknamed the Stairway to Heaven, it's only fair to call this stage as the "Highway to Hell" as they have to face the well known climbs of Passo del Tonale and Passo dell'Aprica, before then descending into Hell itself, and facing the devil that is the fearsome Passo del Mortirolo, followed by a not less impressive climb, but always overshadowed by its famous sibling, in the form of Monte Padrio. After its top, the riders have to face a long downhill towards Tirano. Good luck and have fun!

Climbs
Image Image
Image

Stage 20 - Morbegno - Mendrisio (RCS)
Image
The final mountain stage is raced beween Italy and Switzerland and could also be called the Stage of the Three Lakes, as it was designed mainly around Lago di Como, Lago di Lugano and Lago Maggiore, and thus giving us truly stunning landscapes. It also calls for riders to throw caution out of the wind, and try something far away from the finish, as the climbs get progressively easier as the day goes by. Passo dell'Alpe di Neggia, Monte Sette Termini and Forcorella di Marzio have to be approached with an agressive mindset if someone wants to make up time and steal the leader's jersey or at least climb up on the GC. RCS then says their goodbyes and returns the torch back into ASO's hands

Climbs
Image Image
Image Image
Image

Transfer from Milano-Malpensa Airport to Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport

Stage 21 - Chantilly - Paris. Champs Elysées (ASO)
Image
The races arrives in Paris for the traditional epilogue around the Champs Elysées, also knows as the Sprinters private party, but who knows, maybe we'll get an uninvited guest, just like Vinokourov (was that in 2005? I don't remember xD). Afterwards the celebrations will proceed, with the coronation of the winner of every classification, and afterwards the final podium, in the always beautiful scenery of the Champs Elysées. And then the torch is put out after following the riders in 21 Stages through 5 different countries, as a symbol of hope, union, sacrifice and solidariety, which cycling beautifully represents, and telling a promise of a better tomorrow! This too shall pass.
Stay Safe!
Last edited by ellvey on 22/04/2020, 18:20, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
davandluz
Spettatore
Posts: 25
Joined: 27/03/2020, 18:12

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Post by davandluz »

GRAND TOUR OF THE GRAND TOURS 2020 maps/tours/view/14252

The three race organizers, RCS, ASO and Unipublic have come to agreeing to aggregate the 21 stages of Giro, Tour and Vuelta in one single Grand Tour. Unipublic agreed to host the Grand Departure, and ASO got the final stage, and RCS got the last decisive stages. Every organizer also agreed to equally distribute flat and mountain stages. The exceptionality of the event led to the creation of a tough Grand Tour, with 8 mountain stages, 7 uphill endings and 6 Hors Catégorie KOMs. A 36 km flat ITT and a 10 km TTT will come in aid for rouleurs to have their say. And finally, 7 stages are designed for sprinters. The total mileage is 3388 km. The race will take place in September, starting on the 5th and ending on the 27th, with two rest days on the 14th and the 21st. The only plane transfer is on the last day, from Milano-Linate to Paris-Orly.

I tre organizzatori, RCS, ASO e Unipublic hanno deciso di aggregare le 21 tappe di Giro, Tour e Vuelta in un unico Grande Giro. Unipublic si è preso l'incarico di organizzare la Grande Partenza, ASO ha ottenuto la tappa finale, e RCS ha le ultime, decisive tappe. I tre organizzatori hanno inoltre deciso di distribuire equamente tra di loro tappe di pianura e di montagna. L'eccezionalità dell'evento ha portato alla creazione di un Giro tosto, con 8 tappe di alta montagna, 7 arrivi in salita e 6 GPM Hors Catégorie. Una cronometro individuale piatta di 36 km e una cronosquadre di 10 km verranno in aiuto ai passisti-scalatori. E ancora, 7 tappe sono state disegnate per i velocisti. Il tutto si svolgerà lungo 3388 km di percorso. La corsa si terrà a settembre, con partenza il 5 e arrivo il 27, e due giorni di riposo, il 14 e il 21. L'unico trasferimento via aereo sarà per l'ultima tappa, da Milano-Linate a Paris-Orly.

Sat 5/9, Stage 1: Madrid > Madrid, 10.32 Km, TTT, Unipublic maps/viewtrack/333957

Unipublic decided to locate the Grand Departure in the Spanish capital, Madrid, that will host the initial weekend of the Tour. The first stage is a TTT, which runs through the central roads of the city, without particularly difficult parts, but giving the Tour a majestic start. Start and finish line are located in Puerta del Sol.

La Unipublic ha deciso di collocare la Grande Partenza nella capitale spagnola, Madrid, protagonista del weekend iniziale con due tappe con partenza e arrivo nella città. La prima tappa è una cronometro a squadre, passante per le vie centrali di Madrid, senza particolari sezioni tecniche, ma una regale introduzione a questo evento storico. Linea di partenza e traguardo in Puerta del Sol.

Image

Sun 6/9, Stage 2: Madrid > Madrid, 198.09 Km, flat, Unipublic maps/viewtrack/333895

The second stage in Madrid is designed for sprinters. The first KOMs (Alto de Valdemorillo ed Embalse de Navallera, both 4th category) will elect the first climbers' jersey holder. The last part is a replica of the final Vuelta stage circuit.

Seconda tappa madrilena per velocisti. I primi GPM (Alto de Valdemorillo ed Embalse de Navallera, entrambi di quarta categoria) assegneranno la prima maglia degli scalatori. L'arrivo replica la parte finale del circuito con cui si conclude la Vuelta.

Image

Mon 7/9, Stage 3: Guadalajara > Cuenca, 169.76 Km, medium mountain, Unipublic maps/viewtrack/333974

First stage out of Madrid, with the race proceeding towards East. Starting from Guadalajara, the race does not have particular height difficulties (presenting one single 4th category KOM before the arrival), but with the first uphill finish of this Tour in the UNESCO heritage site Cuenca. An occasion for both specialists and GC riders to put their mark on the race.

Ci si sposta finalmente da Madrid, e si prosegue verso Est. Partendo da Guadalajara, si percorre una tappa senza particolari asperità (solo un GPM di quarta categoria), ma il traguardo nel patrimonio dell'umanità UNESCO di Cuenca, primo arrivo in salita di questo Giro, sarà una prima importante occasione per scattisti e uomini di classifica di mettere un timbro sulla corsa.

Image
Image

Tue 8/9, Stage 4: Cuenca > Observatorio Astrofísico Javalambre, 164.23 Km, high mountain, Unipublic maps/viewtrack/334008

The first high mountain stage, with the first Hors Catégorie KOM, seeing the peloton arriving the the Observatorio Astrofisico Javalambre (11,51 km, 7,37%). The GC will surely be affected by this stage.

La prima tappa di alta montagna, con primo GMP Hors Catégorie, prevede l'arrivo all'Observatorio Astrofisico Javalambre (11,51 km, al 7,37%). I primi scossoni alla classifica generale arriveranno già alla quarta tappa.

Image
Image

Wed 9/9, Stage 5: Teruel > Ciudad del Motor de Aragón, 221.57 Km, flat, Unipublic maps/viewtrack/334050

The quiet after the storm. Probable sprint in the long stage (221 km) that leads from Teruel to the famous motorsport race track Ciudad del Motor de Aragón, which host the Aragon motorcycle Grand Prix.

La calma dopo la tempesta. Probabile arrivo in volata nella lunga tappa (221 km) che porta da Teruel al famoso circuito automobilistico e motociclistico Ciudad del Motor de Aragón, sede del Gran Premio di Aragona in MotoGP.

Image

Thu 10/9, Stage 6: Alcañiz > Reus, 203.91 Km, medium mountain, Unipublic maps/viewtrack/334195

Probable breakaway stage in the medium mountain stage Alcañiz - Reus. The two final climbs (Coll de Faxtes e Coll Roig) and the last descent towards Reus will determine the stage winner.

Probabile tappa di fughe nella movimentata Alcañiz - Reus. I due GPM finali (Coll de Faxtes e Coll Roig) e la discesa verso Reus decideranno il vincitore di tappa.

Image
Image
Image

Fri 11/9, Stage 7: Valls > Estacio d'Esqui Tuixent - La Vansa,167.81 Km, high mountain, Unipublic maps/viewtrack/334325

Last stage organized by Unipublic, the uphill finish (1st category, 22 km, 4,89%) is set at the Tuixent - La Vansa ski area. It will be interesting to see how GC contenders will decide to ride this stage, considering the following La Seu d'Urgell - Bagnères-de-Bigorre stage.

Ultima tappa organizzata da Unipublic, si arriva alla stazione sciistica di Tuixent - La Vansa, in una tappa di alta montagna che ha il suo culmine nel GPM di prima categoria finale (22 km al 4,89%). Sarà interessante vedere come si muoveranno gli uomini di classifica, in vista della successiva La Seu d'Urgell - Bagnères-de-Bigorre

Image
Image

Sat 12/9, Stage 8: La Seu d'Urgell > Bagnères-de-Bigorre, 228.32 Km, high mountain, ASO maps/viewtrack/334347

ASO takes on the Tour with a real treat, presenting a stage that touches cycling history, with 5 KOMs, 4 of which 1st category: Puerto de la Bonaigua (first passage above 2000 m), Col de Portillon, Col de Pereysourde e Col d'Aspin. Longest stage of the Tour, lasting 228 km. Title contenders must not hide.

La ASO accoglie il Giro con una delle tappe regine, che attraversa la storia del ciclismo, passando per cinque GPM, di cui quattro di prima categoria: Puerto de la Bonaigua (primo passaggio sopra i 2000 m), Col de Portillon, Col de Pereysourde e Col d'Aspin. Tappa più lunga con i suoi 228 km. I contendenti al titolo non potranno nascondersi.

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Sun 13/9, Stage 9: Bagnères-de-Bigorre > Toulouse, 165.56 Km, flat, ASO maps/viewtrack/334354

The last stage before the first rest day is designed for riders. Finish line in Toulouse, Occitanie capital, after a mostly calm stage (it presents two 4th category KOMs far from the Flamme Rouge).

L'ultima tappa prima del primo giorno di riposo è per i velocisti. Si arriva a Toulouse, capitale dell'Occitanie, dopo un percorso relativamente tranquillo (presenti due GPM quarta categoria, ma lontani dal traguardo).

Image

REST DAY: Mon 14/9

Tue 15/9, Stage 10: Montpellier > Mont Ventoux 192.77 Km, high mountain, ASO maps/viewtrack/334363

Transfer to Montpellier after the rest day. The second week starts with an exciting stage, the uphill arrival of Mont Ventoux (21 km, 7,08%). We will see how the rest day will have an impact on the riders' legs.

Dopo il giorno di riposo, trasferimento a Montpellier per una ripresa eccitante con l'arrivo sul mitico Mont Ventoux (21 km al 7,08%). Sarà interessante vedere come influirà la sosta sulle gambe dei corridori.

Image
Image

Wed 16/9, Stage 11: Carpentras > Draguignan, 192.36 Km, flat, ASO maps/viewtrack/334371

Flat stage, that only presents two climbs at the beginning, finishing in a probable sprint in Draguignan, Côte d'Azur. This is the first of the three Côte d'Azur stages organized by ASO.

Tappa pianeggiante, dopo due asperità iniziali, che culminerà nella probabile volata di Draguignan, in Costa Azzurra. La ASO inaugura così il trittico di tappe nella regione marittima del Sud francese.

Image

Thu 17/9, Stage 12: Fréjus > Mandelieu-la-Napoule, 36.27 Km, ITT, ASO maps/viewtrack/334387

36 km ITT designed for specialists, starting from the Roman amphitheatre in Fréjus and arriving in front of the La Napoule fortress, riding on the historic route Corniche d'Or. A televisive jewel, cyclists will cross the Massif de l'Esterel red rocks, in a time trial that does not have particular height difficulties, but it presents a difficult road setting.

Cronometro individuale di 36 km per specialisti, che parte dall'anfiteatro romano di Fréjus e arriva di fronte alla fortezza di La Napoule, percorrendo la storica strada Corniche d'Or. Televisivamente spettacolare, i ciclisti attraverseranno le rocce rosse del Massiccio dell'Esterel, in una cronometro senza particolari difficoltà altimetriche ma con una planimetria complessa.

Image

Fri 18/9, Stage 13: Cannes > Santuario Sant'Anna di Vinadio, 200.27 Km, high mountain, ASO maps/viewtrack/334403

Last ASO stage before the Champs-Élysées epilogue, which concludes the Côte d'Azur triptych with a very interesting high mountain stage (D+ 5504 m). After passing Nice, the riders will climb Col de Braus, Col de Turini, Col Saint-Martin and Colle della Lombarda (highest point of this Tour at 2335 m), which leads to the Italian territory. Last short but steep climb towards the Sant'Anna di Vinadio Sanctuary (2019 m, last passage and only arrival above 2000 m)

Ultima tappa di ASO prima della passerella finale degli Champs-Élysées, che conclude il trittico della Costa Azzurra con una tappa di alta montagna molto interessante (5504 m di dislivello positivo). Dopo il passaggio per Nizza, si comincia con il Col de Braus, si prosegue verso il Col de Turini, il Col Saint-Martin e il Colle della Lombarda (punto più alto di questo Giro ai 2335 m), dove si scollina per l'Italia. Ultima ascesa verso il Santuario di Sant'Anna di Vinadio (2019 m, ultimo passaggio e unico arrivo sopra i 2000 m) corta ma dura.

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Sat 19/9, Stage 14: Cuneo > Torino, 135.87 Km, flat, RCS maps/viewtrack/334417

RCS chose Turin as the primary city of the third weekend of the Tour. the 14th stage, from Cuneo to Turin, is a mostly flat stage, apart from an incursion in the Asti hills in the beginning. The conclusion will take place in a fast circuit in the Piedmont capital.

RCS sceglie Torino come sede del terzo weekend del Giro. La quattordicesima tappa, da Cuneo a Torino, è una frazione prevalentemente pianeggiante, salvo un'incursione nelle colline astigiane, che si concluderà con un circuito molto veloce nel capoluogo piemontese.

Image

Sun 20/9, Stage 15: Torino > Santuario d'Oropa, 128.32 Km , high mountain, RCS maps/viewtrack/334442

Religious Sunday stage. Just a few kilometers after the start, the Basilica di Superga climb begins, famous for the Grande Torino airplane accident. The arrival is located in another religious spot, the Oropa Sactuary (1st category, 12,75 km, 5,55%), UNESCO heritage site, strongly tied with Italian cycling legend Marco Pantani. It will be the sacred stage of this Tour, with important implications on the general classification.

Tappa domenicale religiosa. Pochi chilomentri dopo la partenza, si inizia subito con la ascesa verso la Basilica di Superga, tristemente nota per la tragedia del grande Torino. L'arrivo è un altro luogo religioso, il Santuario d'Oropa (prima categoria, 12,75 km al 5,55%), patrimonio dell'umanità UNESCO, fortemente legata a Marco Pantani. Sarà la tappa sacra del Giro, con importanti risvolti sulla classifica generale.

Image
Image

REST DAY: Mon 21/9

Tue 22/9, Stage 16: Tortona > Piacenza, 181.67 Km, medium mountain, RCS maps/viewtrack/334454

Transfer to Tortona after the second rest day of this Tour for a stage that will take place of the Piacenza hills. 7 KOMs will be climbed in this day, amongst which the 1st category Passo Scaparina (8,38 km, 6,46%). Possible winning breakaways.

Trasferimento a Tortona dopo la seconda giornata di riposo per una tappa sui colli piacentini. Ben 7 GPM animeranno questa tappa di media montagna, incluso il prima categoria Passo Scaparina (8,38 km al 6,46%). Possibili fughe vincenti.

Image
Image

Wed 23/9, Stage 17: Codogno > Bergamo, 145.28 Km, flat, RCS maps/viewtrack/334526

The "Coronavirus Stage". RCS decided to dedicate the 17th stage of this Tour to the key areas of the Covid-19 outbreak in Italy, starting from Codogno, where the first European case was found, and arriving in Bergamo, terribly hit, but able to restart. The stage, marked for sprinters, sees its only KOM lying at 18 km from the end, which can lead to surprises. Sprinters must be able to endure these difficulties to conquer the stage ending in Città Alta.

Ribattezzata come "Tappa del Coronavirus", la RCS ha deciso di dedicare la diciassettesima tappa del Giro ai territori simbolo della pandemia di Covid-19 in Italia, partendo da Codogno, luogo del primo caso accertato in Europa, e arrivando a Bergamo, città fortemente colpita, ma in grado di rialzarsi. La tappa, segnata per velocisti, presenta il GPM di quarta categoria di a 18 km dal traguardo che può riservare sorprese. Sarà obbligatorio saper reggere le salite per conquistare questa tappa, che culmina in Città Alta.

Image

Thu 24/9, Stage 18: Bergamo > Piani Resinelli, 184.61 Km, high mountain, RCS maps/viewtrack/334640

Uphill finish at the Piani Resinelli (Hors Catégorie, 14,27 km, 7,1%) in a stage that crosses the roads of the last years Giro di Lombardia, namely the Muro di Sormano e the Madonna del Ghisallo. Last uphill finish, second to last high mountain stage. Big occasion for GC contenders to put their name on the title.

Arrivo in salita ai Piani Resinelli (Hors Catégorie, 14,27 km al 7,1%) in una tappa che ripercorre le asperità che hanno caratterizzato gli ultimi Giri di Lombardia, ovvero il Muro di Sormano e la Madonna del Ghisallo. Ultimo arrivo in salita, penultima tappa di alta montagna. Grande occasione per gli uomini di classifica di mettere una seria ipoteca sul Giro.

Image
Image
Image
Image

Fri 25/9, Stage 19: Lecco > Lovere, 217.55 Km, medium mountain, RCS maps/viewtrack/334652

A stage of lakes and castles. Starting from Lecco, after an initial flat part in the Bergamasca, the peloton arrives on the Lago d'Iseo, where they will find the harderst climbs of the day: from Sulzano, giving their back to Montisola, the Santa Maria del Giogo will be a tough surprise for those who will not be prepared to battle. The last part will be on the Sarnico - Lovere running race track, on the Western tide of side lake, but with a twist: two 2nd category KOMs (Vigolo-Parzanica and Monte Clemo) to spice things up.

La tappa dei laghi e dei castelli. Partendo da Lecco, dopo una prima parte pianeggiante nella Bergamasca si arriva sul Lago d'Iseo, dove si incontreranno le maggiori difficoltà di giornata: da Sulzano, spalle a Montisola, la salita di Santa Maria del Giogo sarà una terribile sorpresa per coloro che non dovessero essere pronti. L'ultima parte percorre la sponda Ovest del Lago, lungo il tracciato della corsa podistica Sarnico - Lovere, ma con due GPM di seconda categoria (Vigolo-Parzanica e Monte Clemo) a complicare la vita ai corridori.

Image
Image
Image
Image

Sat 26/9, Stage 20: Darfo Boario Terme > Grosotto, 156.86 Km, high mountain, RCS maps/viewtrack/334681

Last mountain stage and last stage organized by RCS in this Tour. Iw will be the decisive moment of the Tour, with two Hors Catégorie KOMs to conclude it: Trivigno (15,5 km, 7,74%) and Mortirolo (8,29 km, 11,87%, taken from Mazzo in Valtellina and culminating at the Grosio fork). Finish line in Grosotto, where the Tour winner will be decided.

Ultima tappa di montagna e ultima tappa organizzata da RCS di questo giro. Sarà la tappa decisiva, con ben due GPM Hors Catégorie a concludere questo difficilissimo Giro, il Trivigno (15,5 km al 7,74%) e il Mortirolo (8,29 km al 11,87%, partente da Mazzo in Valtellina ma col suo culmine al bivio per Grosio). Arrivo a Grosotto per cuori forti: il vincitore si deciderà qui.

Image
Image
Image

Sun 27/9, Stage 21: Orsay > Paris Champs-Élysées, 86.51 Km, flat, ASO maps/viewtrack/334700

Classic final stage organized in Paris by ASO. Start line in Orsay, universities area, and it entries Paris through Montrouge. From there, the peloton will pass in front of the Jardins du Luxembourg, Invalides, École militaire and Tour Eiffel, cycle along La Seine, cross the Pont Neuf, pass by the Louvre pyramid and get into the Champs-Élysées circuit, where sprinters will have the chance to secure the points classification.

Classica passerella finale per Parigi organizzata da ASO. Si parte da Orsay, luogo universitario, e si entra a Parigi da Montrouge. Da lì si passerà davanti ai Jardins du Luxembourg, Invalides, École militaire e Tour Eiffel per poi attraversare la Senna sul Pont Neuf, superare la piramide del Louvre e immettersi sul circuito degli Champs-Élysées, con l'ultima occasione per i velocisti di mettersi in mostra e vincere la classifica a punti.

Image
Last edited by davandluz on 06/04/2020, 19:34, edited 3 times in total.

User avatar
davandluz
Spettatore
Posts: 25
Joined: 27/03/2020, 18:12

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Post by davandluz »

sorry for doubleposting, consider my previous post as my contest submission

User avatar
sportdani19
Spettatore
Posts: 9
Joined: 17/06/2019, 12:43

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by sportdani19 »

This Tour following the style of each Tours (Vuelta,Tour,Giro):
[*]Tour Depart is Vigo with a Prologue From Estadio De Balaidos to Centre of Vigo.
[*]7 Flat stages
[*]7 Hilly Stages
[*]5 Mountain Stages
[*]2 Individual Time Trial
[*]3 HC (over 2000) in every Nation.
[*]6 Uphill Finish (3 Mountain Stages) (3 Hilly Stages)
[*]The Queen Stage is the 19: Aprica-Dimaro (Gavia Stage)
[*]Passo Gavia is Most Height Mountain

The only change was the First stage,I.prefer a Prologue to a TTT for This type of tours.
maps/tours/view/14183

User avatar
pabloagb
Spettatore
Posts: 45
Joined: 18/01/2015, 15:27

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by pabloagb »

Contest #3 - The Grand Tour of The Grand Tours

LINK: maps/tours/view/14355

Basic features:

• Two rest days (After stages 9 and 15).
• Seven flat stages.
• Five medium mountain stages.
• Seven high mountain stages.
• A short opening ITT.
• A 58 km long ITT.
• Six mountain-top finishes (1 in an HC climb, 2 in 1st category climb, 2 in 2nd category climbs, and 1 in 4th category climbs).
• Five HC climbs and 12 1st category climbs.
• Stages 1 to 7 are organized by Unipublic, stages 8 to 12,20 and 21 by ASO, and stages 13 to 19 by RCS.

Philosophy:

• Time trialists must have a chance (unlike recent editions of the Tour de France, for instance), but they cannot win without being competent in the mountains, where the race must be decided.
• All stages should be interesting, even flat ones. All stages have some difficulties, and riders should treat them with respect.
• All stages must be coordinated. Mountain stages with demanding mountain-top finishes should come before the mountain stages without them. The ITTs must not interfere with any mountain stage, so I placed it between two flat stages.
• The tour must be realistic and balanced, without going to extremes. Every stage is doable in real life, all UCI rules are strictly followed, and the tour itself looks like previous editions of other Grand Tours.
• Unnecessary transfers should be avoided, even with rest days. Apart from the long transfer to Paris, just three stages have a transfer longer than 50 km, and all of them justified as they came after remote mountain-top finishes. The longest transfers come after the rest days, but they are still 120 and 70 km in length.
• The transfer from Nice to Paris after stage 20 is very simple, as Nice has great connections to Paris thanks to the TGV and its airport.

Stages:

1 Barcelona (Sagrada Familia) > Barcelona (Castell de Montjuïc) ITT 11.78 km

The first stage is a short ITT that runs along some of the most famous sights of Barcelona. From the start at the renowned Sagrada Familia cathedral, it goes to Plaça Catalunya and La Rambla street, which ends at the Columbus Monument. After passing the intermediate time split, we reach Plaça de Espanya and the monuments of the 1929 World Fair, including the Palau Nacional. It is here where the climb up Montjuïc starts. The climb is not very steep, barely reaching 5% at its hardest slopes (like Poggio di Sanremo, for example). The riders and the public will have a chance to see many of the venues used in the 1992 Olympic Games, including the Olympic Stadium, before reaching the castle at the top, where the finish line is located.
Image

2 Barcelona > Lleida Flat 161.90 km

While this stage includes some climbs in the first 90 km, they are no major climbs, so it is categorized as a flat stage. The first half is a nice terrain for breakaways, but the second half is favorable to the peloton. All in all, a great chance for sprinters to take the stage win.
Image

3 Lleida > Castillo de Loarre Medium mountain 147.06 km

The first mountain-top finish on this tour, yet the stage is remarkably flat for the first 140 km. The important part is the final climb, Castillo de Loarre, which has 4 final km at 8% gradient. There should be small differences between the top riders, but any riders who start the tour slightly off-form would be punished. The arrival is located at the medieval Castle of Loarre, which has appeared in several films over the years.
Image

4 Huesca > Soria Flat 224.07 km

At 224 km, this is one of the longest in this tour. I would also call it one of the most deceptive. Firstly, the first 150 km of the stage runs across the Ebro Valley, which is notorious for its strong winds. Secondly, and more crucially, there is a 1 km climb 3 km from the finish which has an average gradient of 9% (in the editor it does not look that steep), so a mass sprint is impossible. This stage is aimed at punchers and sprinters who can tackle small hills, like Sagan.
Image

5 Soria> Burgos Flat 156.23 km

The following stage has some similarities with the previous one, although it is shorter and the climb before the finish is less steep (5% average gradient), further from the finish, and cobbled. Many outcomes are possible for this stage. This climb was used by the Vuelta a España in 2013. In that case, the peloton was able to neutralise all the attacks in the climb but was unable to stop Mollema when he attacked in the flat terrain 1 km from the finish line.
Image

6 Burgos > Vitoria-Gasteiz Medium mountain 215.00 km

The pack enters the Basque Country for the following two stages. The first of them is a long medium mountain stage whose main climb is Puerto de Herrera. This steep climb, with 5 final km at nearly 9%, used to be very important in the Vuelta back in the 60s and 70s, but it has been underutilized ever since. After reaching the top comes a long descent, and finally, the easy climb of Puerto de Vitoria. The finish line is in the town of Vitoria-Gasteiz, after 8 km of descent and false flats.
Image

7 Vitoria-Gasteiz > Irún Medium mountain 180.60 km

The last Spanish stage is another medium mountain stage, though this time it is less demanding than the previous one. The most testing climbs are in the last third of the stage, with the climbs of Igantzi and Agiña. However, the last kilometres are not as hard, so there can be chances for a reduced peloton as well as a breakaway.
Image

8 Bayonne > Bagnères-de-Luchon High mountain 239.99 km

Despite being a grand tour with no history, I decided to pay a tribute to one of the most important mountain stages in history. It is a reverse edition of the 1911 Bagnères-de-Luchon > Bayonne stage. It does not follow the same route as that stage or uses all the same climbs, because of the 240 km UCI limit on stage distance. The last 90 kilometres are the crucial part of the stage, with three climbs, Hourquette d’Ancizan (final 17 km at 4.2%), Col d’Azet (10.7 km at 7.4%), and Col de Peyresourde (final 8 km at 7.7%), before the finish in Luchon, which is also a classic in the Tour de France.
Image

9 Bagnères-de-Luchon > Limoux Medium mountain 195.14 km

The final stage before the rest day is a mix between a flat and a medium mountain stage. The first km feature two classic Pyrenean climbs, Ares and Portet d’Aspet (4 final km at 9.2%), which is great terrain for a big breakaway, the rest of the stage is flatter, though not completely, and there is a final climb, Col du Bac (5 km at 5%), whose peak is 24 km from the finish. The remaining km are far from flat, with descents and even two shorter climbs before arriving in Limoux.
Image

REST DAY

10 Béziers > Aix-en-Provence Flat 145.92 km

Following the rest day comes after a long, simple flat stage for sprinters.
Image

11 Marseille > Toulon ITT 58.80 km

An important day for GC riders. An almost 60 km long ITT, with three climbs in between. It will take riders over one hour of continuous cycling to reach Toulon, and time differences could be massive. We will not know who will win this tour after this stage, but we might know who has lost too much time. Fortunately, there are still plenty of stages to make up any time deficit.
Image

12 Toulon > Monaco Flat 176.13 km

After the second ITT, there is a flat stage with an iconic finish on the streets of Monaco. The last km follows half of the Grand Prix track, from Antony Noghès (the last corner), up to Casino Square after 0,5 km long climb at 5% gradient, and then down to the Grand Hotel Hairpin. Then, for the last km, instead of turning right at Portier and going inside the tunnel, the riders will turn left and head for the finish past the Grimaldi Forum. Due to the multiple tunnels near the Monaco area many steep hills that do not exist in real life appear in the profile. Sprinters could still lose to a very strong attack at the Casino hill and should also pay attention to the tight corners in the Principality, but a mass sprint is still the probable option.
Image

13 Monaco > Monte Saccarello High mountain 157.15 km

The altitude restrictions of this contest open the possibility of exploring hidden gems in Italy’s vast repertoire of mountain passes. This stage sets out to do just that. The first 40 km have as many border crossings as climbs. After arriving in Sanremo, the going gets tougher. Three first category mountain passes in quick succession with the finish line located at the top of the last pass. First comes Monte Ceppo (18.9 km at 5.9%), then Passo di Teglia (11.6 km at 8%), and finally Monte Saccarello (21 km at 6%). There is plenty of terrain for attacks, and even if the riders wait for the final climb, we could see great time gaps between riders.
Image

14 Albenga > Monte Beigua High mountain 151.83 km

Second Italian stage and second consecutive mountain-top finish. Unlike the previous stage, the main climbs are concentrated in the last third of the stage. First comes Ca’ di Ferrè, with the last 7.5 km at 8.4%, perfect for making a strong selection in the peloton. Finally, the most demanding and only HC mountain-top finish on the tour, Monte Beigua. At 14 km in length and an average slope of 8%, it has neither extreme maximum percentages nor barely any rest bite. It shares many characteristics with Alpe d’Huez, so it should not disappoint in delivering a great spectacle.
Image

15 Savona > Mondoví Medium mountain 157.16 km

The last stage before the second rest day is designed with tactical movements in mind. It is a rollercoaster of a stage with several climbs. The crucial part is in the middle, with three-second category climbs and one first category climb in quick succession. We will also witness many riders willing to join a breakaway, and even if the GC riders have a passive attitude, the uphill finish, may deliver some time differences.
Image

REST DAY

16 Asti > Estoul High mountain 177.38 km

Following the last rest day, the peloton will face a demanding high mountain stage in the Aosta Valley. The climbs are concentrated in the last 60 km. Colle Tzecore comes first, with 16 km at 7.7%, the hardest of the day, followed without flat terrain between them by Colle di Joux, another 16 km long climb with an average slope of 6.7%. Instead of the longer, less steep climb to Cervinia, used in recent editions of the Giro, riders will face the shorter yet steeper climb of Estoul, which comes after a very short descent. This mountain-top finish has 7.4 km at 7.7%.
Image

17 Aosta > Torino Flat 165.34 km

The last chance for sprinters before arriving in Paris.
Image

18 Torino > Pinerolo High mountain 155.47 km

The final three mountain stages start with a stage between Torino and Pinerolo, featuring the mighty Colle delle Finestre. Before that, the peloton will be reduced by Moncenisio, which is a perfect climb for domestiques if any team wants to make the most of the stage. After its descent, we reach Susa and the start of the Colle delle Finestre (19 km at 9.2%), with about half of the climb unpaved. It has always provided the spectators and fans with great attacks and battles, but I decided to try a new approach, because, after its descent, the riders will not climb Sestriere but descend it, heading for Pinerolo. Two more climbs await, Pramartino, which has a very technical descent, and San Maurizio, a tricky climb on the streets of Pinerolo, that could be the final nail in the coffin of some riders. It is a small risk to have Finestre so far from the finish because attacks could be more easily neutralized, but there is also more potential for large time gaps if the attacks are successful.
Image

19 Pinerolo > Valle Varaita High mountain 181.03 km

The final Italian stage features the last 2000 metres climbs in this tour, Colle d’Esischie (27.2 km at 6.3%) and Colle di Sampeyre (15.8 km at 8.6%), which I hope play a role similar to Finestre in the Sestriere stages of the Giro, with Valle Varaita (20.4 % at 4.2%), as a new Sestriere. The idea is that riders attack at Esischie or Sampeyre and hold on or expand their gap to the chasing riders in the final climb. Even if they cannot succeed, the last kilometres of the climb are hard enough to launch new attacks, with 5 km at 6.9%, including 1 km at 8.9%.
Image

20 Cuneo > Nice High mountain 230.86 km

The last mountain stage of this tour is a mix between medium and mountain stage, with two 1st category climbs and five 2nd category climbs. Col de Turini might witness some crazy attacks or tactical moves, but more realistically, Col de la Madone (12.7 km at 7.1%) will be the decisive climb of the day, followed by the final climb of Col d’Èze, that is less demanding. The closest thing to this type of stage is seen in the Vuelta a España (for example, stage 18 of last year’s edition, or stage 20 of 2015, where Morcuera and Cotos would play the role of Madone and Èze), and they have worked well. In 2015, Dumoulin even lost the lead to Aru on that stage.
Image

21 Mantes-la-Jolie > Paris Flat 116.93 km

The final stage of the tour is the same as the stage for the 2020 edition of the Tour de France.
Image
Last edited by pabloagb on 09/04/2020, 12:28, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
pabloagb
Spettatore
Posts: 45
Joined: 18/01/2015, 15:27

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Post by pabloagb »

jibvalverde wrote:
05/04/2020, 1:44
Here is my Grant Tour for the contest.

maps/tours/view/14303
I am not 100% sure, but I think Pailhères is a 2001m climb, so you should eliminate 1of the 4 2000+ climbs that you have now.

User avatar
jibvalverde
Appassionato
Appassionato
Posts: 84
Joined: 16/11/2017, 5:28
Contact:

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Post by jibvalverde »

pabloagb wrote:
08/04/2020, 16:32
jibvalverde wrote:
05/04/2020, 1:44
Here is my Grant Tour for the contest.

maps/tours/view/14303
I am not 100% sure, but I think Pailhères is a 2001m climb, so you should eliminate 1of the 4 2000+ climbs that you have now.
pabloagb wrote:
08/04/2020, 16:32
jibvalverde wrote:
05/04/2020, 1:44
Here is my Grant Tour for the contest.

maps/tours/view/14303
I am not 100% sure, but I think Pailhères is a 2001m climb, so you should eliminate 1of the 4 2000+ climbs that you have now.
Right, i've been fooled by profiles. I'll change that

User avatar
AjachiChakrabarti
Spettatore
Posts: 19
Joined: 18/07/2019, 18:44

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by AjachiChakrabarti »

Here's my entry: maps/tours/view/14364

STAGE 1 (RCS): Saturday, 5 Sep
Venice > Ravenna: 177.95 Km
maps/viewtrack/336688
The race begins in Venice and heads down the coast to Ravenna for a sprint finish next to the mausoleum of Theodoric the Great. Although the stage is pan flat, never going higher than sea level, the coastal route and open landscape create the possibility of echelons, should one team decide to test everyone's legs.
Image

STAGE 2 (RCS): Sunday, 6 Sep
Ravenna > Mantua: 173.33 Km
maps/viewtrack/336687
From the Roman fortress of Ravenna, we head to the Austrian fortress of Mantua, so crucial to the Italian wars of unification. Another flat stage ends with a sprint finish at the ducal palace, with a bridge complicating matters in the final three kilometres.
Image

STAGE 3 (RCS): Monday, 7 Sep
Verona > Verona: 33.88 Km (TTT)
maps/viewtrack/336685
Stage 3 is a team time trial around Verona, starting and finishing at the Piazza Pradaval. After leaving Verona, the route climbs up to Montecchio, with slopes reaching 10% at places, which will force teams to strategise about how much dead weight they can carry.
Image

STAGE 4 (RCS): Tuesday, 8 Sep
Verona > Merano: 178.33 Km
maps/viewtrack/336682
The race heads into the Alps, albeit with another likely sprint finish at Merano, in South Tyrol. The stage, which is entirely sloping gently uphill, features the first KOM point of the race, with a fourth-category climb near the finish.
Image

STAGE 5 (RCS): Wednesday, 9 Sep
Bormio > Prato Maslino: 139.27 Km
maps/viewtrack/336659
The climbing begins in earnest with a very difficult Alpine stage. It begins in Bormio, usually the launchpad for the Gavia, but since that is off limits, we head south to the Mortirolo before turning west. After the second-category Passo del'Aprica and the first-category climb to San Giovanni, the first mountain-top finish of the race takes place on Prato Maslino, a 10 km climb at an average gradient of over 13%.
Image

STAGE 6 (RCS): Thursday, 10 Sep
Lecco > Turin: 196.85 Km
maps/viewtrack/336627
One last chance for the sprinters in the first week, as the race heads to Turin. Four ninety-degree turns in the final kilometre will make placement in the bunch crucial.
Image

STAGE 7 (RCS): Friday, 11 Sep
Ivrea > Planaval: 153.75 Km
maps/viewtrack/336587
The final Italian stage of the race heads back into the mountains, this time in the Aosta Valley on the French border. The stage features three first-category climbs, finishing on top of Planaval.
Image

STAGE 8 (ASO): Saturday, 12 Sep
Bourg-Saint-Maurice > Valloire: 133.01 Km
maps/viewtrack/336551
The French leg of the race begins in Bourg-Saint-Maurice. The stage quickly heads uphill with the first-category Col du Pradier, which is followed by the HC Col de la Madeleine. The final climb of the day is the Telegraphe, with eight bonus seconds up for grabs at the top, before a quick descent into Valloire for the finish.
Image

STAGE 9 (ASO): Sunday, 13 Sep
Albertville > Alpe d'Huez: 146.43 Km
maps/viewtrack/336533
We round out the weekend with another Alpine stage. Beginning in Albertville, this is a traditional Alpe d'Huez stage, with the Lacets de Montvernier and the Croix de Fer as appetisers.
Image

REST DAY: Monday, 14 Sep

STAGE 10 (ASO): Tuesday, 15 Sep
Gap > Marseille: 194.27 Km
maps/viewtrack/336386
After the rest day at Gap, we leave the Alps behind at a fast pace, with the stage almost entirely downhill until we reach Marseille. The stage finishes in front of the hippodrome.
Image

STAGE 11 (ASO): Wednesday, 16 Sep
Nimes > Carcassonne: 210.06 Km
maps/viewtrack/336382
Another flat stage with the possibility of crosswind chaos, as we follow the coast and open countryside from Nimes to Carcassonne. At 210 km, this is the longest stage of the race.
Image

STAGE 12 (ASO): Thursday, 17 Sep
Toulouse - Place du Capitole > Toulouse - Basilique Saint-Sernin: 20.11 Km (ITT)
maps/viewtrack/336380
The first individual time trial of the race is entirely within the city of Toulouse. Bike handling will be as important as wattage on this twisty street circuit.
Image

STAGE 13 (ASO): Friday, 18 Sep
Tarbes > Hautacam: 129.63 Km
maps/viewtrack/336351
The only stage in the French Pyrenees starts at Tarbes. After a couple of early fourth-category climbs and the intermediate sprint comes the first big test: the Col d'Aubisque. This is followed by the third-category Col de Soulor and a long descent before the stage finishes on top of Hautacam.
Image

STAGE 14 (Unipublic): Saturday, 19 Sep
Arette > Donostia: 198.04 Km
maps/viewtrack/336253
The race heads into Spain, crossing the border on top of the Col d'Ispeguy. This weekend is dedicated to the Classica San Sebastian, which also had to be cancelled because of the pandemic, with the race finishing with the Murgil and the familiar downhill run into Donostia.
Image

STAGE 15 (Unipublic): Sunday, 20 Sep
Donostia > Arrate: 161.08 Km
maps/viewtrack/335878
This difficult stage features nine of the Basque country's many iconic hills, beginning with the Jaizkibel and ending on top of the Arrate.
Image

STAGE 16 (Unipublic): Monday, 21 Sep
Bilbao > Reinosa: 177.74 Km
maps/viewtrack/335805
The final week of the race begins in Bilbao. We head along the coast to Santander before turning inland towards the finish at Reinosa. The last third of the stage is almost entirely uphill, but not steep enough to entirely rule out a sprint finish. A breakaway staying away is probably the likeliest outcome, though, with the major teams trying to conserve energy for the trials ahead.
Image

STAGE 17 (Unipublic): Tuesday, 22 Sep
Guardo > Alto de l'Angliru: 159.59 Km
maps/viewtrack/335781
The first 100 km of the stage are lumpy plateau roads, before a long descent brings us to the foot of the first-category Alto del Cordal, which comes with a bonification at the top. The stage ends on top of the dreaded Angliru.
Image

STAGE 18 (Unipublic): Wednesday, 23 Sep
Oviedo > San Emiliano: 133.92 Km
maps/viewtrack/335841
After the Angliru, this stage features three other famous Asturian climbs: the Cobertoria, the Puerto de San Lorenzo and La Farrapona. The last of these is followed by a 15 km downhill run to the finish at San Emiliano.
Image

REST DAY: Thursday, 24 Sep

STAGE 19 (Unipublic): Friday, 25 Sep
Santa Cruz de Tenerife > Santa Cruz de Tenerife: 52.29 Km (ITT)
maps/viewtrack/335605
From the Asturias airport at Oviedo, we hop onto a flight to the Canary Islands for the final two stages, which will decide the winner of the race. First, we have a long time trial looping around Santa Cruz de Tenerife, heading up and down the Pico del Ingles.
Image

STAGE 20 (Unipublic): Saturday, 26 Sep
San Cristobal de La Laguna > Observatorio Astronomico del Teide: 120.69 Km
maps/viewtrack/335498
The race reaches a climax with a short stage featuring two of the toughest climbs in all of Spain. First up is the climb to Puerto Izana, with stretches in excess of 20%. A 40 km descent brings us back to the coast, where we double back and make the tortuous climb to the Teide observatory, over 18 km long at an average gradient of 12.6%.
Image

STAGE 21 (ASO): Sunday, 27 Sep
Rambouillet > Paris - Champs Elysees: 112.26 Km
maps/viewtrack/335342
After two gruelling stages in the Canary Islands, we hop back on a plane to Paris for the traditional Champs Elysees stage.
Image

User avatar
ellvey
Spettatore
Posts: 32
Joined: 31/08/2018, 16:17

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by ellvey »

sportdani19 wrote:
08/04/2020, 2:02
[*]Passo Gavia is Most Height Mountain
According to Emmea, you have to avoid climbs over 2500m, so you might want to replace Passo di Gavia :)

User avatar
ellvey
Spettatore
Posts: 32
Joined: 31/08/2018, 16:17

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by ellvey »

AjachiChakrabarti wrote:
09/04/2020, 4:20

STAGE 18 (Unipublic): Wednesday, 23 Sep
Oviedo > San Emiliano: 133.92 Km
Image

REST DAY: Thursday, 24 Sep

STAGE 19 (Unipublic): Friday, 25 Sep
Santa Cruz de Tenerife > Santa Cruz de Tenerife: 52.29 Km (ITT)
Sorry to bother you, but there are a couple of things you should look into in order to avoid losing points.
First the Castilla y Leon side of Alto de Farrapona, that you use as a descent, is unpaved, and to my knowledge, not suitable for road racing. You might want to look into it, there are some nice possibilities in the region that avoid using that unpaved section ;)
Second, according to Emmea, you can only have a big transfer to go to Paris, so you might want to consider your trip to Canarias, even if it was quite interesting. I'd suggest exploring Western Asturias, Galicia or the Sierra de la Cabrera mountain range. Good luck :D

User avatar
AjachiChakrabarti
Spettatore
Posts: 19
Joined: 18/07/2019, 18:44

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by AjachiChakrabarti »

Thanks for the info about Farrapona. Will rethink that stage, probably just keep it as a short stage with a summit finish.
As for the trip to Canarias, it's a bit of a grey area because the rule said "possibly avoiding big plane transfers" but did not explicitly forbid it. And the clarification was that we can't have extra rest days. I'm using the second rest day for the transfer to Tenerife. The Asturias airport is quite close to the finish of Stage 18, and it's a three-hour flight. Flight time to Paris is a little over four hours, which works because the final stage starts later anyway. I picked the Canary Islands because it's the easiest way to more or less guarantee that 2000m+ climbs will not be snowed out in September. I think the logistics work; could the admins confirm whether or not it is against the rules? Happy to change the route if it is.

User avatar
Zaufkauf
Spettatore
Posts: 4
Joined: 03/07/2019, 22:39

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Zaufkauf »

LINK: maps/tours/view/14158

Basic Properties:
- This Grand Tour starts in Livorno and ends after 3333 km in Paris.
- It has 7 flat stages, 5 hilly stages, 6 mountain stages, 2 ITT and 1 TTT
- With 6 mountain top finishes (2 HC, 3 1. Cat and 1 4. Cat).
- 71.5 km induvidual time trial and 17 km team time trial.

Stages

Stage 1 Livorno > Livorno TTT (RCS)

Starting in Livorno with a Team Time Trial along the coast. With a complete flat and wide road it is a TTT for the real specialists.
The tour won't be lost here but significant timeloss can already happen.

Image

Stage 2 Livorno > Firenze (RCS)

From Livorno to Firenze we go through the hilly terrain of Tuscany and visit some of it's white roads.
The road isn't flat for a moment and with a stage over 200 km this could already strain some riders with bad legs.
The climb of Il Pinone 30 km before the finish will definitely split the peloton or what is left,
and with a small climb of 1 km at 7% in Firenze at 4 km before the line it will probably be up to the punchers for this stage.

Image

Image


Stage 3 Prato > Modena (RCS)

The first part of the stage we cross the Apennine Mountains and then make our way to Modena a city famous for it's automobile industry.
But before the finish a small detour is made to Marinello the Ferrari base and a small climb of 4th Cat.
This is a stage for the sprinters, and a classic Italian finish.

Image

Image

Stage 4 Verona > Treviso (RCS)

Another flat stage another day for the sprinters. As long as the wind doesn't play a role this will be an easy stage.

Image

Stage 5 Belluno > San Candido (RCS)

The longest stage in this tour and it's a tough one. A lot of climbs on the menu today as they cross through the Dolomites.
If the GC man want to save their energy it'll be a day for the break. The climb of Bannberg and Bichl are hard enough to make some with bad form pay.
After that it is still 17 km false flat to the finish, if a GC rider falls behind without support it can be very costly.

Image

Image
Image

Stage 6 Trento > Bergamo (Città Alta) (RCS)

Another long hilly stage to Bergamo, along some of the lakes of northern Italy. With the finish up to the old city centre it is an ideal finish for punchers.
The GC men will have to be focused to not lose any time. Whereas the outcome will depend on the breakaway and the willingness of teams to control the race for their puncher.

Image

Image

Stage 7 Monza (Autodromo Nazionale Monza) > Torino (RCS)

Keeping with the automobile theme, the start is at the famous Monza circuit and the stage takes us to Turin.
The stage is made for the sprinters, as there are no climbs on the day.

Image

Stage 8 Rivoli > Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne (ASO)

The first real high mountain stage, and the highest point of the tour is reached on the Col du Mont Cenis (2083m).
With the climbs of Col du Chaussy (1512m) and Col de la Croix de Fer (2021m), this stage has got 3 brutal climbs.
The GC men have to show their cards here. The autumn weather could have a heavy impact on the riders this day.

Image

Image
Image
Image

Stage 9 Le Bourg d'Oisans > Fort du Saint Eynard (ASO)

A second day in the alps and the first mountaintop finish.
The day starts at the foot of the Col d'Ornon, riders who recovered badly from the first mountain stage will be in trouble as the battle for the break will start right away.
The ride takes us to a fortification high in the mountains of Grenoble.
It is a steep climb till the end, the view on the top is worth it, but the riders won't care. As they have suffered all day and end the day with 2 HC climbs.

Image

Image
Image

Rest day 1 in Saint-Étienne

Stage 10 Saint-Étienne > Monistrol-sur-Loire ITT (ASO)

The long individual time trial right after a rest day, that will surely cause problems for some GC men.
The time trial is 47 km long over less than flat terrain. The uphill sections aren't steep so strong TT men can handle this.
The downhill from Trémas is pretty technical, but other than that large roads. Climbers will fear this day.

Image

Image

Stage 11 Monistrol-sur-Loire > Montélimar (ASO)

From the Loire to the Rhône.
The first 50 km are breakaway territory but after that the peloton can control the race and a sprint is more than likely.

Image

Stage 12 Montpellier > Argelès-sur-Mer (ASO)

A long day in the saddle along the Mediterrean coastline, with a 3rd Cat. climb at the end.
The wind could play a big part in this stage as echelons are a real possibility. This stage could be won by a puncher or a very strong sprinter.
As the percentages of the climb aren't that steep.

Image

Image

Stage 13 Argelès-sur-Mer > Puigcerdà (Unipublic)

The Pyrenees have arrived. A long stage from almost sea-level to a maximum height of 1776m.
A long run-up before the climbing starts could lead to a long battle for the break. With only 3 climbs of the 2nd Cat and 1 of the 1st Cat it seems easier than it is.
As it has 4000m of climbing.

Image

Image
Image
Image
Image

Stage 14 Puigcerdà > Coll de la Botella (Andorra) (Unipublic)

A difficult day in the Pyrenees with 4 climbs all in Andorra. The first climb of the day is the Collada de la Gallina used often in the Vuelta the last years.
Then the combination of the Coll de Beixalis and the Coll d'Ordino and lastly the Coll de la Botella, which is at 3/4 th of the way to the top of the Port de Cabus.
Here is a small ski-station as the top of the Port de Cabus cannot facilitate the entire circus.

Image

Image
Image
Image
Image

Stage 15 Foix > Station de Superbagneres (ASO)

The last day before the second rest day and the last day in the Pyrenees. The queen stage of this tour.
With famous tour cols and a finish which we haven't seen since the tour of 1989. With the tour going towards the last week and still 1 time trial ahead, the climbers would like to use this day to attack other GC riders. Many would want to wait till the last climb as the run-up of 18 km false flat can break you. Tacticly this one could be very interesting.

Image

Image
Image
Image

Rest day 2 in San Sebastian

Stage 16 San Sebastian > Balcón de Bizkaia (Oiz) (Unipublic)

We enter Basque country and after the rest day the riders will have to face another mountain top finish. As is usual in the Vuelta it is on a steep climb.
Balcón de Bizkaia lastly visited in the Vuelta of 2018, then the differences were small in the top of the GC. Some will have the TT of tommorow in their head but you can't save energy as you will lose a lot of time to the rest.

Image

Image

Stage 17 Galdakoa > Bilbao ITT (Unipublic)

The last time trial kilometers in this tour and it is a dificult one. 25 km with a serious climb at the start. Pure TT specialists have a chance but there climbing legs have to be superb.
Maybe the previous stage can help their chances a bit as they could save energy where the GC guys can't.

Image

Image

Stage 18 Bilbao > Santander (Unipublic)

A "flat" stage that takes them from Basque country to Cantabria. The road is never really flat which makes it difficult to control. This could either go to the break or a sprinter with a very strong team.

Image

Stage 19 Torrelavega > Lagos de Covadonga (Unipublic)

The last high mountain top finish and it is a Vuelta classic. Lagos de Covadonga is a beautiful and difficult climb especially after 2.5 weeks.
The road towards the climb is fairly flat so we should see a very fast ascent.

Image

Image

Stage 20 Oviedo > Oviedo (Unipublic)

The last stage for the GC riders to make a difference, with the only long climbs in the start of the stage it becomes tactical to attack.
It depends on the time gaps how this stage is gonna go. But don't think that the 2nd category climbs are just formality. The trio of Siones, Las Carangas and Campa Dosanga is short in succesion and steep. Here a difference still can be made.

Image

Image
Image
Image
Image

Flight from Asturias Airport > Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport - No rest day

Stage 21 Saint Denis > Paris (ASO)

The classic last stage of the tour a short flat stage with finish on the Avenue des Champs-Éllysées.

Image

User avatar
Micek_52
Spettatore
Posts: 12
Joined: 16/10/2019, 21:43

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Micek_52 »

AjachiChakrabarti wrote:
10/04/2020, 0:09
Thanks for the info about Farrapona. Will rethink that stage, probably just keep it as a short stage with a summit finish.
As for the trip to Canarias, it's a bit of a grey area because the rule said "possibly avoiding big plane transfers" but did not explicitly forbid it. And the clarification was that we can't have extra rest days. I'm using the second rest day for the transfer to Tenerife. The Asturias airport is quite close to the finish of Stage 18, and it's a three-hour flight. Flight time to Paris is a little over four hours, which works because the final stage starts later anyway. I picked the Canary Islands because it's the easiest way to more or less guarantee that 2000m+ climbs will not be snowed out in September. I think the logistics work; could the admins confirm whether or not it is against the rules? Happy to change the route if it is.
I also understood it that way. You should avoid the plane transfers but they are not illegal. I also checked some older TDF maps and saw that in 2018 there were two plane transfers.
I, for example planned a stage 3 short (153km) ending in Roubaix which is close to the airport in Lille. From Lille to Ronchi dei legionari is 1.5 hour maybe 2 hour flight. Then the distance from Ronchi to Nova Gorica (start of ITT on stage 4) is about 30km. So mine could also be done.

I hope that admins will say that this is OK, because otherwise the changed course will look really strange (possibly even Roubaix stage on stage 20.)

User avatar
Jekp
Spettatore
Posts: 4
Joined: 03/04/2020, 0:59

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Jekp »

Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

When i saw this, I had to give it a go. So after a week of hard work here is my Grand Tour of the Grand tours [url]htps://www.la-flamme-rouge.eu/maps/tours/view/14284[/url]

The route consists of:
2 Individual Time Trials, one early in the race and one just a couple of days before the end. This will force the climbers to attack throughout the tour to win back the time they have lost on the early Time Trial and then try to gain more time, so that they have a lead on the Time Trial specialists before the ITT on stage 19.
7 high Mountain stages
5 medium Mountain stages
7 flat stages
5 mountain top finishes
57.77 km of ITT.
Spoiler!
stage 1 (RCS): Roma-Grosseto 201km
The tour starts in Roma. the stage is mainly flat, with 4 4th category clims on the way to Grosseto.
Image

Stage 2 (RCS): Grosseto-Siena 189km
The second day the rider continue north from Grosseto. On the way to Siena the riders will climb the first 1st category climb of the tour. The finish sits after a 2,7km climb averaging 4,5%. Most of the climbs are in the first half of the stage except the final climb. Final climb is to hard for the pure sprinters but maybe a bit to easy for the puncheurs
Image

Stage 3 (RCS): Firenze-Firenze 32,7km ITT
An individual time trial on the programme today. Early in the race its important for the climbers not to lose to much time. The two climbs in the middle give them some hope to minimize the loss.
Image

Stage 4 (RCS): Pistoia- Pavullo nel Frignano 165km
On stage 4 the riders get there first encounter with a Hors Category climb, placed in the middle of the stage Passo Lagadello, will leave only the strongest climbers in the front, before the last 2 climbs. The stage should not create big gaps between the biggest GC favorites.
Image

Stage 5 (RCS): Modena- Pavia 190,5km
This stage harbours no particular difficulties and should and up in a mass sprint in the end.
Image

Stage 6 (RCS): Vercelli-Sauze d'Oulx 209km
The longest stage of the race and the first of three consecutive days in the mountains. The route before the final climb is not very hard so the attacks will come on the last climb.
Image
Image

Stage 7 (RCS): Pinerolo- Dronero 164,5km
Last stage by RCS sees the first mountain pass reaching over 2000m. The riders that want to gain significant amounts of tim eon their opponents will have to make thir move on the Colle Esische, as the Montemale di Cuneo is not long enough to create big gaps.
Image
Image
Image

Stage 8 (ASO): Borgo san Dolmazzo(ita)- Col de Turini(fra)150,5km
After 2 hard days in the mountains in Italy, The first stage in France is brutal. With two ascents of the Col de Turini.
Image
Image
Image
Image

Stage 9 (ASO): saint_Martin_Vesubie- Cannes 199km
Last stage before the first rest day. The first half is mountainous, while the last part is mainly downhill. A great oppurtunity for the breakaway to go all the way.
Image

REST DAY TOULON

Stage 10 (ASO): Toulon- Nimes 207km
After the rest day the sprinters get an oppurtunity to shine. The route is flat, but the wind can be a factor as they ride along the sea for most of the day.
Image

Stage 11 (ASO): Montpellier- Perpignan 194.5km
A flat stage that take the riders west along the Mediterranian coast. If the wind is up, the stage could be hectic. If not it will be a mass sprint.
Image

Stage 12 (ASO): Saint-Esteve > Ax-les-Thermes 168 km
The first of two stages in the Pyrenees. Not hard enough to create the biggest gaps in the overall standings, but there is no rest for the riders. A good chance for a breakaway to go all the way.
Image

Stage 13 (ASO): Ax-les-Thermes(fra) > Os de Civis(esp) 157km
The riders leave france over Port d'Envalira into Andorra. Through Andorra, on the way to Spain. The riders have to climb three 1st category climbs, a 4th category and 3 2nd category climbs. The final of Alto de la Rabassa, Collada de la Gallina and Os de Civis will be a great opputunity to gain time in the overall standings.
Image
Image
Image
Image

Stage 14 (Unipublic): Seu d' Urgell > Lleida 194.5 km
One of the last stages with a flat finish before Paris. However there are more than 20km of clibing to be done early in the stage making it difficult to control the size of the breakaway for the
sprinters team. The rest of the stage is fairly easy except a 2nd category 75km before the finish line.
Image

Stage 15 (Unipublic): Lleida > Zaragoza 179.5 km
Last day before the rest day the route is flat without any difficulties.
Image

REST DAY LOGROÑO

Stage 16 (Unipublic): Miranda de Ebro > Alto Campoo 192km
The first stage after the rest day is easy all the way to the final climb to Alto Campoo (17.2km 5,8%).
Image
Image

Stage 17 (Unipublic): Torrelavega > La Camperona 187.5 km
Today the riders have to tackle the steep La Camperona climb. Before that there is 6 categorised climbs early in the stage. This is the last realistic chance the climbers have to give themselves a lead on the Time Trial specialists before the next ITT.
Image
Image

Stage 18 (Unipublic): Leon > Oviedo 198.5 km
The first half of the stage is easy with no difficulties. The last 80km on the other hand will make it a hard race, with 5 hills all reaching slopes of more than 9.5%. The best placed riders in the GC will probably be saving energy for tomorrows ITT. So the stage is open.
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Stage 19 (Unipublic): Gijon > Lluanco 25km ITT
An 25 kilomtre long ITT in undulating terrain. Placed late in the Tour, it forces the weakest riders to attack earlier in the Tour to have a lead before this Time Trial, as there is only one Mountain stage left afterwards.
Image

Stage 20 (Unipublic): Grado > Ermita de Alba 151.5 km
Last Chance to gain the upperhand in the General Classification . If a rider has good legs, he can cause a lot of damage. First the steep Puerto de san Lorenzo with sectors hitting 20%. Then there is three short clims before entering the last 40km. Starting with the Alto del Cordal climb, often used as a prequel to Alto Angliru. Then it is in to the Alto de la Cobertoria, where the Attacks can begin. After a fast descent the riders will face the 6.6km climb to Ermita de Alba with an average of 11%. Having a bad day today can be costly in the overall standings.
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Flying from Aeropuerto de Asturias to Paris Charles du Gaulles Airport

Stage 21 (ASO): Creil > Paris (Champs-Elysses) 136km
Final stage to the Champs-Elysses. The winner will be honoured before the sprinters battle it out for a prestigious win on the Champs-Elysses.
Image

User avatar
mike4296
Appassionato
Appassionato
Posts: 57
Joined: 07/04/2014, 16:13

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by mike4296 »

Hey all! Only a pandemic could make me come back to tracking after basically a 2 years hiatus. In the forthcoming days I'll show you my route but, for now, I'll leave you with a preview... :beer:

Image

Post Reply