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Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

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Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by emmea90 »

Image
Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Due to Covid-19 pandemic spreading in 2020 both Giro d'Italia and Tour de France were cancelled. Vuelta also had to be postponed by 20 days.

ASO, RCS and Unipublic gets to an agreement to organize one single Grand Tour in september with parts of all the three tours.

ASO also gets to end the Grand Tour in Paris, with the classic Champs-Elysees stage. Due to this, you have to end stage 20 in a way to arrange a realistic transfer to Paris in the evening/morning after the stage (ending near an airport, an high velocity train station if in France, etc).

You have to spilt the stages during the 21 days in an equal stages, possibly avoiding big plane transfers (except for the Paris stage)

Route should be designed in respect of the UCI limit of 3500 Km for a Grand Tour.

You have also to take into account that the Grand Tour will be held in september, so you have to avoid climbs over 2500m and you have to limit climbs over 2000m at 3 maximum.

It shall be clear who organize what stage between RCS, ASO and Unipublic organizes what stage and the total shall be 7 for each organizer. It's not forbidden to go in other countries but it shall be clear who is the organizer - for example, a stage that goes into Andorra, can be organized by both ASO and Unipublic but a stage with the majority of that in Italy shall be organized only by RCS.

Please write in stage the description which is the organizer of each stage.

Please use for the Grand Tour the Tour de France 2019 profile.

Evaluation shall take into account
- Grand Tour balancing
- Realism of the transfers and the stage
- Satisfaction of the organizers
- Key stages in the weekend and not having too many "flat/sprint" stages in a row

Deadline will be on april 25, h 23.59
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TourDeFranceGO
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by TourDeFranceGO »

maps/tours/view/14308

The tour travels from Milan north through Spain, via the Mediterranean in France and into the alps in Italy. There are plenty of tough climbs early on, as well as a high finish to the Andorra Arcalis, which was visited by the Tour in 2026. However the first real tests are 2 stages in the Alps, including the untried Plateau des Saix as well as a stage similar to 2018 in which Alpe d'Huez was preceded by 2 other HC climbs. The final leg is in Italy. The race traverses up to Milan and the Italian Alps, with 3 massive summit finishes and then returns back to Paris for the Champs Elysees.

Rest days / transport:
After the first 7 days in Spain (organised by Unipublic including the Andorra stage.) The riders will travel to Barcelona (a roughly 2 hour journey) and then make a quick flight to Montpelier where the first rest day will be held. After 6 days in France (organised by ASO) the riders will travel from Alpe d'Huez to Grenoble where they will fly to Turin/Torino. Finally, after a penultimate stage on the Monte Zoncolan (and 7 days organised by RCS) the riders will travel to Venice (roughly 2 hours) where they will then have a 1.5 hour flight to Paris before. Because the stage is processional and tends to begin later, the greater amount of travelling I think can be accommodated for.

stage 1 - maps/viewtrack/335271

Stage 1 is a team time trial between the stadiums of two of the biggest football clubs in Europe - namely Real Madrid and Althletico Madrid

stage 2 - maps/viewtrack/335274

stage 2 is a flat stage from Madrid to Valladolid. Although the Alto de la Cevillana will probably cause problems early on, the stage is long enough that the sprinters should be fine.

stage 3 - maps/viewtrack/335277

stage 3 is the first hilly stage of the edition. A breakaway would likely take the honors, and although there is climbing to do it probably wouldn't interest the GCs.

stage 4 - maps/viewtrack/335281

stage 4 transfers the riders over to Bilbao for a likely sprint finish. But the nature of the hilly although not steep roads could aid a breakaway in holding off the peloton.

stage 5 - maps/viewtrack/336554

stage 5 is propably another one for the breakaway. The first 90 km are on tough terrain allowing gaps to open. The final climb will probably also see the first GC action although some might want to save energy for what is coming up...

stage 6 - "flat" is about as opposite a word as you can get to describe this stage. Constant punchy climbs suit breakaways and long range attacks. The final climb to Ibon de los Banos should invite GC attacks, and a bonus sprint offers a unique chance to gain a few seconds. Even with this stage a great opportunity for GCs to attack the next stage is where the action will likely happen.

stage 7 - maps/viewtrack/336578

stage 7 is a monster although we should probably reserve that for what RCS has in store. 215 kilometers, the last 70 of which are entirely either up or downhill and a finish at 2200 metres mean that this stage will undoubtedly be significant by the time the riders finish in Paris.

stage 8 - maps/viewtrack/336588

The first stage organised by ASO should be a simple finish in a sprint at Avignon with no difficulties

stage 9 - maps/viewtrack/336590

Mont Ventoux returns, but in a way you didn't expect. Plans of a time trial up Etna were tossed out by RCS, but ASO has similar plans. Furthermore, some bonus seconds are available for the first rider to Chalet Reynard.

stage 10 - maps/viewtrack/336593

The stage is a little bumpy but should end in a sprint

stage 11 - maps/viewtrack/336593

It may be classified as a flat stage but one thing stands out - the col des fleuries climb is perfectly positioned for an attack and if the breakaway doesn't make it to the line, perhaps one or two of the GCs could see an opportunity to surprise their rivals.

stage 12 - maps/viewtrack/336602

The Plateau des Saix has never been climbed before on the tour. It will be preceded by the Col de la Croix Fry and the Col de la Colombiere. However, it may be overlooked as a new edition due to stage 13.

stage 13 - maps/viewtrack/336830

Col de la Madeleine, Col du Glandon, Alpe d'Huez ... 3 Hors Categorie climbs that should set the race alight. The finish at Alpe d'Huez is however not the last monster of a stage...

stage 14 - maps/viewtrack/336835

stage 14 is the first stage organised by RCS. Like the 2 following stages it is a simple flat stage that should end in a bunch sprint.

stage 15 - maps/viewtrack/336839

stage 15 finishes in Milan, and should end with a sprint.

stage 16 - maps/viewtrack/336848

stage 16 takes in the shores of lake Como. The finish in Lecco should once again be a bunched sprint.

stage 17 - maps/viewtrack/336876

stage 17 may be come a legend. The early summit of the Passo san Marco and the of the Trivigno Pass will be selective. But it is the mighty Mortirolo that will decide this stage.

stage 18 - maps/viewtrack/336953

A stage for the breakaway, stage 18 offers plenty of climbing followed by a long flat section of around 80kms off the final descent. The stage should not interest the GCs, however could prove to be an opportunity for a rider who has lost lots of time to climb back up the overall ranking.

stage 19 - maps/viewtrack/336926

stage 19 - The Passo Duran is only 10kms but at an average of 9%. However it is the climb to Tre Cime de Lavero that will worry GC candidates and riders alike. At almost 2400 metres, with double digit gradients sometimes reaching roughly 15%, this stage could open up large gaps in the overall.

stage 20 - maps/viewtrack/336943

Monte Crostis, a 15 km climb at 8% will be climbed today. But that will not be the chief worry of the riders. The Zoncolan will be climbed via the eastern side, a climb of 7kms at an average gradient of 13%. This is where the race will be won and lost.

stage 21 - maps/viewtrack/319043

The final stage should as always end in a bunch sprint on the Champs Elysees.




Key stats:
Length - 3385.78kms
Stages - 21 (7 Unisport, 7 ASO and 7 RCS)
ITT stages - 1
TTT stages - 1
Flat stages - 9
Hilly / medium mountain stages - 3
Mountain stages - 7

Climbs:
HC - 13
Cat 1 - 9
Cat 2 - 12
Cat 3 - 17
Cat 4 - 4

8 summit finishes, 2 descent / flat finish (updating mortirolo stage once API is available)

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TourDeFranceGO
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by TourDeFranceGO »

emmea90 wrote:
23/03/2020, 9:40
Image
Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Due to Covid-19 pandemic spreading in 2020 both Giro d'Italia and Tour de France were cancelled. Vuelta also had to be postponed by 20 days.

ASO, RCS and Unipublic gets to an agreement to organize one single Grand Tour in september with parts of all the three tours.

ASO also gets to end the Grand Tour in Paris, with the classic Champs-Elysees stage. Due to this, you have to end stage 20 in a way to arrange a realistic transfer to Paris in the evening/morning after the stage (ending near an airport, an high velocity train station if in France, etc).

You have to spilt the stages during the 21 days in an equal stages, possibly avoiding big plane transfers (except for the Paris stage)

Route should be designed in respect of the UCI limit of 3500 Km for a Grand Tour.

You have also to take into account that the Grand Tour will be held in september, so you have to avoid climbs over 2500m and you have to limit climbs over 2000m at 3 maximum.

It shall be clear who organize what stage between RCS, ASO and Unipublic organizes what stage and the total shall be 7 for each organizer. It's not forbidden to go in other countries but it shall be clear who is the organizer - for example, a stage that goes into Andorra, can be organized by both ASO and Unipublic but a stage with the majority of that in Italy shall be organized only by RCS.

Please write in stage the description which is the organizer of each stage.

Please use for the Grand Tour the Tour de France 2019 profile.

Evaluation shall take into account
- Grand Tour balancing
- Realism of the transfers and the stage
- Satisfaction of the organizers
- Key stages in the weekend and not having too many "flat/sprint" stages in a row

Deadline will be on april 25, h 23.59
What day would the tour start on? Would it be Saturday I assume?

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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by emmea90 »

TourDeFranceGO wrote:
10/04/2020, 13:38
emmea90 wrote:
23/03/2020, 9:40
Image
Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Due to Covid-19 pandemic spreading in 2020 both Giro d'Italia and Tour de France were cancelled. Vuelta also had to be postponed by 20 days.

ASO, RCS and Unipublic gets to an agreement to organize one single Grand Tour in september with parts of all the three tours.

ASO also gets to end the Grand Tour in Paris, with the classic Champs-Elysees stage. Due to this, you have to end stage 20 in a way to arrange a realistic transfer to Paris in the evening/morning after the stage (ending near an airport, an high velocity train station if in France, etc).

You have to spilt the stages during the 21 days in an equal stages, possibly avoiding big plane transfers (except for the Paris stage)

Route should be designed in respect of the UCI limit of 3500 Km for a Grand Tour.

You have also to take into account that the Grand Tour will be held in september, so you have to avoid climbs over 2500m and you have to limit climbs over 2000m at 3 maximum.

It shall be clear who organize what stage between RCS, ASO and Unipublic organizes what stage and the total shall be 7 for each organizer. It's not forbidden to go in other countries but it shall be clear who is the organizer - for example, a stage that goes into Andorra, can be organized by both ASO and Unipublic but a stage with the majority of that in Italy shall be organized only by RCS.

Please write in stage the description which is the organizer of each stage.

Please use for the Grand Tour the Tour de France 2019 profile.

Evaluation shall take into account
- Grand Tour balancing
- Realism of the transfers and the stage
- Satisfaction of the organizers
- Key stages in the weekend and not having too many "flat/sprint" stages in a row

Deadline will be on april 25, h 23.59
What day would the tour start on? Would it be Saturday I assume?
Yes
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antoninvds
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by antoninvds »

Hi ! Here is my route for this contest : maps/tours/view/14455. clap

It is called "v2" because I made a first one which was not good enough in my opinion. So this one is the only one I submit for this difficult contest.

This Grand Tour starts in Avilés, in the spanish community of Asturias and finishes in Paris, on the Champs Elysées avenue, for a 3445km-long route. It contains 7 flat stages, 6 medium mountain or hilly stages and 6 high mountain stages, with globally 7 top finishes, including 4 in high mountains. Time trials are set on stages 3 and 20, for a 55km total.
Riders will go up to 2000m three times, in Pyrénées 2000 on stage 9, and twice during stage 18, passing col du Mont-Cenis and finishing at les Granges du Galibier.

There are 2 HC climbs, 18 first category and 12 second category climbs. Some of them have also a time bonus (8, 5 and 2 seconds).

Main points of this route are :
- Arate, stage 5.
- Baños de Panticosa, stage 7.
- Pyrénées 2000, stage 9.
- Turini, stage 11.
- Mortirolo and Cancano Lakes, stage 14.
- Sormano and Civiglio, stage 15.
- Jafferau, stage 17.
- Mont Cenis and part of Galibier, stage 18.
- Chasseral, stage 19.
- Planche des Belles Filles, stage 20.

I tried to keep at least one of the real finishes of the real routes scheduled for 2020 Grand Tours. Otherwise, I took some of passed finishes and increased them with other ideas, and I admit, with some wishful thinkings. My method consists in making a movements race, and the yellow (oh wait...) jersey could be held by another racer everyday.

There are the stages :

1. Avilés > San Vincente de la Barquera (Unipublic) — Flat.
Mainly flat, this stage contains nevertheless some little climbs, the last one is set 8km before the finish line and could interfere in the sprint trains. Could be a sprint, but only with strong men.
Image[/img]

2. Torrelavega > Santo Toribio de Liebana (Unipublic) — Hilly.
A second stage in Spain is rarely easy, this one proves it. Not so hard but if a sprinter won the day before, he could lost the lead in the final climb, well-know by Sander Armee, who won there on Vuelta 2017.
Image[/img]

3. Santander > Santander (Unpublic) — ITT.
This chrono is short and made for pure rouleurs, climbers and puncheurs who were advantaged yesterday could lose a minute in the streets of Santander.
Image[/img]

4. Somo > Bilbao — Guggenheim (Unipublic) — Flat.
Flat in Spain is not always flat, if this stage could be for a sprinter, a guy like De Gendt could also win just in front of the Guggenheim Museum.
Image[/img]

5. Bilbao > Eibar — Arate (Unipublic) — Hilly.
This is the first route made for a battle between the GC contenders as Arate will be climbed twice, with a time bonus the first time. The stage is short, only 156km, but D+ is above 3000m.
Image

6. Irun > Pau (ASO) — Flat.
The peloton enters France for the first time for a really flat stage which is moreover long, more than 210km for a finish where sprinters won't have any excuse.
Image[/img]

7. Oloron-Sainte-Marie > Baños de Panticosa (Unipublic) — Medium Mountain.
Back in Spain by climbing Port de Larrau, the peloton has a long stage again which finishes over Panticosa, in front of the Thermal Baths, 1600m above sea level.
Image[/img]

8. Huesca > La Seu d'Urgell (Unipublic) — Medium Mountain.
Last stage in Spain with a 1st category climb just before the arrive in Catalunya. Port del Canto could be a chance for attackers or for those who have already lost time.
Image[/img]

9. Font-Romeu > Font-Romeu — Pyrénées 2000 (ASO) — High Mountain.
France, here we are ! A loop is made around the ski station of Font-Romeu with 3 climbs before the last one, going over 2000m above sea level. Just before the first rest day, GC contenders will fight to be serene for the second week.
Image[/img]

Then, riders go to Perpignan-Rivesaltes Airport and fly to Nice for the first rest day. The journey is done in almost 3 hours.

10. Nice > Nice (ASO) — Flat.
First stage in Nice, the third in France, and another loop. Promenade des Anglais will see a sprint after a relative-flat stage. Some baroudeurs may have a chance.
Image[/img]

11. Nice > Turini (ASO) — High Mountain.
Second day in Nice, and like it had to be in the Tour, riders will climb la Colmiane before Turini. The only difference, and not the least, is that there will be no downhill after last climb.
Image[/img]

12. Vintimille > Gênes (RCS) — Flat.
Welcome to Italy, and to the Riviera. This stage will take the Milano - San Remo roads and climb many capi. The arrive in Genoa is made for sprinters, last time before Torino in 5 days.
Image[/img]

13. Plaisance > Trente (RCS) — Medium Mountain.
Between Piacenza and Trento, it will be the longest stage of this tour, with 236km and a climb just before the arrive. Baroudeurs or GC contenders attacking in the downhill, let's see !
Image[/img]

14. Trente > Lacs de Cancano — Parc National du Stelvio (RCS) — High Mountain.
As scheduled by the Giro, a mountain stage arrives in the Stelvio National Park, but without climbing Stelvio itself. Indeed, riders will cilmb Mortirolo before going up to Bormio and to the famous Torri di Fraele, with a time bonus up there...
Image[/img]

15. Colico > Côme (RCS) — High Mountain.
This one is pure dynamite. Twice Sormano and a finish which is the same as Il Lombardia. A sunday, people have to be happy seeing a punchy stage : welcome to Lombardia.
Image[/img]

Rest day in Lombardia, highly touched by the Covid pandemic. A revival.

16. Milan > Turin (RCS) — Flat.
RCS loves long stages with no climb between two mountain stages : here it is, but this one is shorter, either a second rest day or wild plains ? Sprinters will decide in Torino, just in front of the Juventus Stadium. Fictive departure will be on Piazza Duomo.
Image[/img]

17. Rivoli > Bardonèche — Jafferau (RCS) — High Mountain.
This stage is not THE stage, but Jafferau climb could make some little differences before the queen stage of this Grand Tour, the day after. Before it, riders have to climb Montgenèvre and l'Échelle, both in France and not too complicated. GC contender or baroudeur, that is the question.
Image[/img]

18. Bardonèche > Valloire — Les Granges du Galibier (RCS) — High Mountain.
Same as Giro 2013, the major part of this stage is a mountain concentration. RCS accepted to finish its part in France to facilitate the ending of this Grand Tour and did it well. Télégraphe and Galibier are really hard when climbed together and even if Galibier is not climb entirely, this short stage will be tough as riders go over 2000m twice in the same stage : Mont Cenis will be the first climb of the day.
Image[/img]

19. Genève > Morteau (ASO) — Medium Mountain.
Leaving the Alps is not the guarantee to win : there is the proof. 228 kilometres and some climbs later, those who want to win will have to be strong during this stage, crossing Switzerland to finish in the small city of Morteau, in French Jura. Faucille and Chasseral will be major climbs of the day. Even if Chasseral is set with 60km to the finish line, the end of the stage is not easy with the last climb which has more than 10% slopes during almost one km.
Image[/img]

20. Lure > Planche des Belles Filles (ASO) — Mountain ITT
I could not take off this chrono. Of course it is not my idea. But, well, I wanted to let ASO spirit in my route, so... there it is.
Image[/img]

21. Mantes-la-Jolie > Paris — Champs Élysées (ASO) — Flat
:beer: :beer: :beer:
Image[/img]

Hope you'll enjoy it !

Be safe,

Antonin :beer:

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improb
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by improb »

UCI limit of 3500 Kms? Doesn't the Giro regularly breach that?

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rober_vlc
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by rober_vlc »

This is my Tour. I don't know how can i show all the stage on the wall

maps/tours/view/14471

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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Micek_52 »

improb wrote:
16/04/2020, 18:30
UCI limit of 3500 Kms? Doesn't the Giro regularly breach that?
Only in Italy it is possible to have 3 time trials and not be able to keep the race under 3500km. :mrgreen:

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improb
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by improb »

mike4296 wrote:
10/04/2020, 11:50
Hey all! Only a pandemic could make me come back to tracking after basically a 2 years hiatus. In the forthcoming days I'll show you my route but, for now, I'll leave you with a preview... :beer:

Image
I had used Monte Padrio (still undecided exactly for this reason) as well in one of my stages but don't you think it's too narrow? I guess it may be fine as a climb but less so as a descent

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davandluz
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by davandluz »

improb wrote:
17/04/2020, 14:01
mike4296 wrote:
10/04/2020, 11:50
Hey all! Only a pandemic could make me come back to tracking after basically a 2 years hiatus. In the forthcoming days I'll show you my route but, for now, I'll leave you with a preview... :beer:

Image
I had used Monte Padrio (still undecided exactly for this reason) as well in one of my stages but don't you think it's too narrow? I guess it may be fine as a climb but less so as a descent
I know that roads pretty well, as a relative of mine has a house on that mountain (in the Valtellina side), and it is in good conditions! Wouldn't know about the climb though.

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ellvey
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by ellvey »

Well the Giro has previously used very narrow roads like the ones found in Passo di Pampeago, Fauniera, Sampeyre or Cazon di Lanza, even Finestre's descent is quite narrow, so i think it's okay, at least that's my opinion

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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Piet_Agoras »

Hi guys,
This is my proposal for the Grand Grand Tour.
EDIT: Based on comments below, I will adapt a stage. New version coming up.

(I will present it beter later on, but here are the key statistics:)
0 long transfers (exept the Paris one)
1 TTT
2 ITT
3 Capitals united
4 One-day Classics honored
5 High Mountain Stages (3x Top finish)
6 Medium Mountain Stages (4x Top finish)
7 Flat Stages
3287 Total km's
Last edited by Piet_Agoras on 20/04/2020, 9:30, edited 1 time in total.

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taaramae_crack
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by taaramae_crack »

Piet_Agoras wrote:
17/04/2020, 17:25
Hi guys,
This is my proposal for the Grand Grand Tour.
maps/tours/view/14172

(I will present it beter later on, but here are the key statistics:)
0 long transfers (exept the Paris one)
1 TTT
2 ITT
3 Capitals united
4 One-day Classics honored
5 High Mountain Stages (3x Top finish)
6 Medium Mountain Stages (4x Top finish)
7 Flat Stages
3287 Total km's
Hi! I watched your route and I noticed that in the second stage you are finishing on Valle de los Caídos (what you called "Monasterio de Santa Cruz"). I don't know if you are aware of what actually that is, but it's not definetly a good idea finishing a stage there :lol: So you might consider deleting or changing that final climb.

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Pincoletto
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Pincoletto »

This is my "Grand Tour of the Grand Tours", friendly called "GT of the GT"!
maps/tours/view/14456

- 3460 total km
- 7 Flat stages (Bayonne, Zaragoza, Tarragona, Montpellier, Savona, Tortona, Paris/Champs Elysées)
- 5 Medium Mountain stages (Bilbao, Girona, La Seu d'Urgell, Mont Faron, Salsomaggiore Terme)
- 7 High Mountain stages (Alto Cruz de la Demanda, Andorra, Valgerola, Aprica, Espace San Bernardo, Le Grand-Bornand, Alpe d'Huez)
- 2 individual Time Trial (Bordeaux, Casale Monferrato)
- 2 rest days
- 1 Wine Stage dedicated to "Barbera del Monferrato" (stage 13)

- 3 mountains over 2000 m; Coll de la Botella (2077 m), Colle del Piccolo San Bernardo (2186 m, CIMA COPPI), Col de la Croix-de-Fer (2066 m)
Spoiler!
01 ASO Bordeaux/Parc des Expositions > Bordeaux/Place de la Bourse 12.23 Km ITT **
Image
02 ASO Bordeaux > Bayonne 218.09 Km *
Image
03 UNI Saint-Jean-de-Luz > Bilbao 173.84 Km ***
Image
04 UNI Bilbao > Alto Cruz de la Demanda 218.05 Km ****
Image
05 UNI Logroño > Zaragoza 197.42 Km *
Image
06 UNI Motorland Aragón > Tarragona 167.28 Km *
Image
07 UNI Barcelona > Girona/Castillo de Montjuïc 179.17 Km**
Image
08 UNI Banyoles > La Seu d'Urgell 213.13 Km ***
Image
09 UNI La Seu d'Urgell > Andorra/Coll de la Botella 116.29 Km *****
Image
10 ASO Perpignan > Montpellier 184.38 Km *
Image
11 ASO Arles > Mont Faron 172.32 Km ***
Image
12 RCS Cannes > Savona 189.01 Km *
Image
13 RCS Genova > Salsomaggiore Terme 179.64 Km ***
Image
14 RCS Cremona > Valgerola/Pescegallo 208.95 Km ****
Image
15 RCS Morbegno > Aprica 151.31 Km *****
Image
16 RCS Boario Terme > Tortona 190.12 Km *
Image
17 RCS Alessandria > Casale Monferrato 47.64 Km ITT *****
Image
18 RCS Ivrea > Espace San Bernardo 166.99 Km *****
Image
19 ASO Bourg-Saint-Maurice > Le Grand-Bornand 152.25 Km ***
Image
20 ASO Albertville > Alpe d'Huez 179.71 Km *****
Image
21 ASO Fontainebleau > Paris/Champs-Élysées 141.95 Km *
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Last edited by Pincoletto on 26/04/2020, 14:09, edited 1 time in total.
Uno dei pochi sport in cui Berlusconi non abbia investito una lira è il ciclismo, dunque qualcosa di buono deve averlo

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nieky
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by nieky »

Here is my #Contest 3 Grand Tour!

maps/tours/view/14193

3451.31 Km
7 High Mountain Stages (Vallée Restonica, Edolo, Vaujany, Ventoux, Andorra, Covadonga and Tourmalet)
5 Medium mountain stages (Bosa, Siena, Abetone, Ainsa, Arrate)
7 Flat stages (Capo Testa, Bastia, Riva del Garda, Narbonne, Girona, Logrono, Paris)
2 Individual Time trials (Bergamo, Barcelona)

3 Mountains above 2000m (Petit St Bernard, Cortalis d'Encamp and Col du Tourmalet)

Stage 1: Cagliari - Bosa (RCS) - Saturday

The grand départ of this grand tour is on the beautiful island of Sardinia.The start of this stage is in Cagliari and the first half of the stage is not that hard. 35 km From the finish line the cyclists have to climb the 'Badde Urbara'. A 2nd category climb which will test the sprinters. Will they survive and battle for the first stage win, or will an attack succeed? The finish is in the beautiful village of Bosa.

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Stage 2: Bosa - Capo Testa (RCS) - Sunday

The 2nd stage starts with a though climb on Montresta. The breakaway will form here. The final takes the cyclists along the beautiful Sardinian coast. The wind may be tricky, but normally this stage will end in a mass sprint.

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Stage 3: Bonifazio - Vallée de la Restonica (ASO) - Monday

Today will be a very tricky stage for the GC riders, however the scenery will be beautfiul. The start is on the cliffs of the beautiful village Bonifazio. From there the riders ride to the col d'Ospedale, the beautiful col de Bavella. The breakaway will be gone here. After returning to the coast: The final will start. The col de Sorba will be followed by the colle the Belle Granjana before arriving in Corte. But there the riders have to conquer the first MTF of this GT. The Climb to Restonica is 15 km's long with 6,5% average. The GC can't be won here, but it will sure create some time gaps between the favourites.

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Stage 4: Corte - Bastia (ASO) - Tuesday

The 4th stage is a really short one, because the peloton has a transfer to the mainland of Italy. There are soms hills along the way, but normally the sprinters will make it across those hills. A mass sprint in Bastia is possible, but a succesfull breakaway is also a possibility because of the short distance (just 103 km's)

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Stage 5: Livorno - Siena (RCS) - Wednesday

A strade bianche tribute! Today the riders start in Livorno and before finishing on the Piazza del Campo in Sienna, they will face soms white roads. Not too much, so normally the differences will be nog that big. Which driver will be the first on the piazza del Campo and takes the victory?

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Stage 6: Firenze - Abetone (RCS) - Thursday

This will be a short and explosive one between Firenze and Abetone in de Appenines. The climb to Abetone is not steep enough to create some big gaps (Only 5%), but the length will make it hard for some riders. You can't afford a bad day today!

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Stage 7: Modena - Riva del Garda (RCS) - Friday

The classic sprint stage in Italy to cross the Po river. The GC drivers get some rest today, but the sprint-battle is on! This is there last chance in Italy and they definitely want to take it.

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Stage 8: Riva del Garda - Edolo (RCS) - Saturday

The first big stage in the second weekend! The GC battle is on! The riders have to face some serious mountains. After the start in Riva del Garda the peloton is heading to the Passo Crocedomini, the first HC mountain in this GT. From there the riders are riding towards Edolo. After crossing the finish line, the cyclists will have a local lap with two monsters: The monte Padrio and the legendary Passo del Mortirolo. Not only the steep gradiënts of the climbs will be decisive, also the descents are very tricky.

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Stage 9: Bergamo - Bergamo (RCS) - Sunday

Today is a tribute to the many COVID-19 victims in Italy. The city of Bergamo is happy to welcome the peloton for this Time trial. It is not a very long TT, but it is a hilly one. The riders are passing through the City Alta before crossing the finish line. After today the GC leader is a complete rider who is a contender to go all the way to Paris!

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Stage 10: Courmayeur - Vaujany (ASO) - Tuesday

After the restday the riders are facing some high mountains in the Alps. First they will pass the col du petit st Bernard. From there the riders will go towards the Col de la Madeleine and the col du Glandon before a final uphill finish towards the ski village of Vaujany. Today there are a lot of mountain points on the road. Some long-range attacks are also a possibilty. Which rider will go from far to take the victory in Vaujany?

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Stage 11: La Mure - Mont Ventoux (ASO) - Wednesday

The giant of the provence. Off course there will be a finish on top of the Mont Ventoux in this GC. Stage 11 is tough for the GC contenders. But they will get some rest after today so it is possible that they go all-in on le Mont Ventoux.

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Stage 12: Nimes - Narbonne (ASO) - Thursday

Flat stage from Nimes to Narbonne, but when the riders will cross the Camarque there is always a chance of crosswinds. Will the wind turn today's stage upside down or will it be a normal sprint in Narbonne?

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Stage 13: Perpignan - Girona ( Unipublic ) - Friday

The coast of Catalunya is the scenery for the 13th stage of this GC. The hilly roads of Catalunya are not that tough, but there are some tricky climbs along the way. Will there be a mass sprint or a breakaway in Girona before enter de second important weekend of this GT?

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Stage 14: Circuit de Catalunya - Barcelona (unipublic) - Saturday

The 2nd time trial of this GT. Today is a long and flat one. Only the hills of Parc Guëll and Montjuic are present on this stage. The start of this TT is on de Circuit de Catalunya and the finish is on one of the most famous streets of Barcelona: La Rmablas. Also La Sagrada Familia and Camp Nou will be passed during this TT.

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Stage 15: Montresta - Andorra (Cortalis d'Encamp) (Unipublic) - Sunday

Before the rest day there will be one more showdown for the GC riders. Today the will face some tricky climbs in Andorra: Col de la Rabassa, Col du Beixalis before finishing on Cortalis d'Encamp.

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Stage 16: Andorra la Vella - Ainsa (Unipublic) - Tuesday

Breakaway day! Today will be to hard for the pure sprinters and the climbs are probably not hard enough to test the GC drivers. The hills are just south of the high Pyrenees and the stage winner will be a strong rider!

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Stage 17: Jaca - Logrono (Unipublic) - Wednesday

Last sprint stage before Paris. The stage is quite flat, so it has to be a mass sprint. Who is going to win in Logrono ?

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Stage 18: Aigular de Campo - Lagos de Covadonga (Unipublic) - Thursday

A classic Spanish MTF can't be absent in this GT. So today the riders are climbing the beautiful Lagos de Covadonga. Who will be the next winner on Lagos de Covadonga, after Pinot in 2018?

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Stage 19: Laredo - Eibar (Arrate) (Unipublic) - Friday

Stage 19 is a tricky one! 8 climbs; 4500m denivel meters. Steep Basque climbs and a finish in Arrate. Long-range attacks are possible! Every rider will be happy when they are at the finish in Arrate. But there is one hell of a stage left.....

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Stage 20: St-Jean pied de port - Col du Tourmalet (ASO) - Saturday

Col Inharpu, Col du Marie-Blanque; Col d'Aubisque, Col de Trabaou before a MTF on the Tourmalet! 5700 denivel meters. Today will be decisive, not only for the GC but also for the mountain jersey. Sprinters have to survive today to arrive in Paris tomorrow. After today the GC has been set. Who will win the Grand tour of grand tours?

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Stage 21: Evry- Paris Champs Élysées (ASO) - Sunday

The classic Champs Élysées sprint stage in Paris! This will be a motivation for the sprinters to survive the mountain stages in Nothern Spain. Who will be the last stage winner? And who will win the green jersey?

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Pontix
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Pontix »

How can I insert the picture of the stage in the post?

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SmokingPuppy841
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by SmokingPuppy841 »

Route:
maps/tours/view/14509

Organisers:
Stages 1 to 7 - Unipublic
Stages 8 to 9 - ASO
Stages 10 to 16 - RCS Sport
Stages 17 to 21 - ASO

Stages Summary:
21 Stages
4 Mountain Top Finishes
7 High Mountain Stages
7 Medium Mountain Stages
7 Flat Stages
2 Individual Time Trials

Description:
Week One:
The Tour begins with a trio of flat stages, which should provide a chance for the sprinters to shine, even if the 1000m+ of climbing on Stage 1 removes some of their chances of victories. Stage 4 is the first ITT of the race - 18km in Alicante. This'll provide a GC shake-up, and create time gaps between the favourites. Stage 5 will probably go to the break, before another sprint stage on Stage 6.

The week rounds out in the Pyrenees, where we'l find out the contenders for the Tour. Stage 7, to Bagneres-de-Luchon, could see attacks on the final climb of the say, and Stage 8 could see attacks throughout the second half of the stage on the Pelotons way to Bagneres-de-Bigorre. Stage 9 is the first MTF of the Tour, and 1 of only 2 climbs above 2000m - the Col Du Tourmalet. The 87km stage gives time for a transfer to Italy in the evening, as well as limiting time gaps between the GC favourites.

Week Two:
The Italian leg of the Tour begins with a long day of 222km, and with the final climb summiting 3km from the finish it could be a day with some GC changes - would Vincenzo Nibali fancy treating the Tifosi to an attack into Perugia? Stage 11 is a flat stage, before Stage 12s 32km ITT. Any time lost by the Time Trialists will surely be made back up here, as the balance swings back in the favour of Dumoulin, Froome, Roglic and Thomas. Stage 13, to Venice, is the latest stage of the entrie Tour - with only 69m of climbing on the 197km stage. The week ends with a pair of mountainous stages, with GC potential into Trento on Stage 14 followed by the biggest shake-up yet on Stage 15 - over 4000 metres of climbing ending on a MTF on Monte Zoncolan.

Week Three:
After a race day in Milan, Stage 16 to Turin looks set to go to the break due to some small climbs in the middle of the day. This then takes us to the finale of the Tour - 4 Alpine stages where the race will be decided. Stage 17 sees the race travel across the border and into France, with the day ending on a Plateau in Valloire. Stage 18 sees the races highest point achieved, at 2360m on the MTF of the Col D'Izoard.

Stage 19, the Queen Stage, will almost certainly be the best stage of the race. 228km, and 5391m of climbing on a day which heads from Briancon to Saint-Jean-De-Maurienne via Italy over 7 categorised climbs. It may not be a MTF, but their will be major time gaps in GC. Stage 20 then heads up Alpe D'Huez as the final MTF of the Tour, before a transfer to Paris for Stage 21 (albeit on a different route to the past)

Summary:
This Tour should keep a close GC race going throughout due to its backended nature - their is unlikely to be major time gaps in the mountains until Stage 15.

The opening week keeps everyone pretty close, and this could lead to more attacking racing on Stages 7 and 8 (particulalry if anyone did have a poor Time Trial), whilst the Tourmalet alone should result in a finish a bit like the 2019 TDF unless a team really decide to attack.

The Stage 12 ITT increases the advantage the Time Trialists had over the pure climbers, although this gap could easily be reversed on Stage 15, making the GC close on the second rest day.

Then, Stages 18-20 are almost all certain to see major shake-ups as the eventual winner is decided, with Stage 19 being particulalry decisive.

The sprinters should still have their chance to shine, with 7 stages potentially going there way, and climbs dotted through multiple stages give the break a chance at both stage wins and the KOM competition.
Last edited by SmokingPuppy841 on 27/04/2020, 10:13, edited 1 time in total.

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Pontix
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Pontix »

This is my Grand Tour of the Grands Tour maps/tours/view/14447
It’s 3362km long, with 7 flat stages, 6 medium mountain, 6 high mountain and 2 ITT.
There are 58 KOM climbs, 18 of 4th Cat., 12 of 3rd Cat., 11 of 2nd Cat., 10 of 1st Cat. and 7 HC.

Those are the stages:
Stage 1 – Roma (Piazza Venezia) - Roma (Colosseo) (ITT) – 12,5 km ----- Organized by RCS
maps/viewtrack/332292
An ITT on the street of the centre ofRome, the start is in Piazza Venezia in front of the Altare della Partia, then we go trough Piazza Colonna and Piazza Barberini to the Pincio and Piazza del Popolo, passing along the Tevere and Castel Sant’Angelo we reach the foot of the Giannicolo and on the top will be assigned the first KOM points, then we go downhill to Trastevere, we go around the Circo Massimo for arrive at Colosseo.

Stage 2 – Ladispoli - Castiglione del Lago – 192,5 km ----- Organized by RCS
maps/viewtrack/332304
The classical stage for the breakaway, a medium mountain stage with 5 categorized climbs (1 of 4th and 4 of 3rd), we pass along the lake in the center of Italy (Bracciano, Vico and Bolsena) before the arrival on the shore of the Lake Trasimeno, some sprinter could arrive in the main group but i twill be a stage very hard to control.

Stage 3 – Arezzo - Rimini – 175 km ----- Organized by RCS
maps/viewtrack/332318
Another medium mountain stage, but this time is harder, the pure sprinters will be dropped for sure on the climb to Cima di Auditore (2nd Cat., 7,5km at 6,2%) with the gradient often in two digits. The last 15km completly flat will allows to some non-pure sprinter with teammates to re-join the breakaway and fight for the stage win.

Stage 4 – Ravenna - Padova – 166 km ----- Organized by RCS
maps/viewtrack/332348
Finally the first stage for pure sprinters, the only climb of the day situated 19km to the end won’t create any problem for them.

Stage 5 – Schio - Monte Bondone (Vason) – 151,5 km -----Organized by RCS
maps/viewtrack/333140
The first high mountain stage is quite short but with tre climbs, one of 1st Cat. (Pian delle Fugazze) and the cilms of the Monte Bondone as HC. From Aldeno the stage is quita the same as the final part of the GF Charly Gaul, and on the final climb the battle will begin, but looking at Tomorrow stage…

Stage 6 – Pinzolo - Aprica – 172 km ----- Organized by RCS
maps/viewtrack/333150
Second high mountain stage long at with just 15km flat, we start with the climbs of Campo Carlo Magno, Passo del Tonale and the first climb of Aprica, but the trouble will begin at Mazzo di Valtellina, we the climb of Mortirolo starts, 12,5km with an average gradient of 10,5%, and the central part of 6km at 12,2%. After this there will be another climb to Aprica, where is located the arrival. This stage will crate the first big difference beetween the GC contenders

Stage 7 – Como - Torino – 197 km ----- Organized by RCS
maps/viewtrack/333170
After the two high mountain stage the sprinters has another opportunity for them, 197km quite completely flat, the 4rd category climb of Bosco Grande could create some trouble at them, but there is enough distance for the finish to come back to the peloton.

Stage 8 – Susa - L’Alpe d’Huez – 126 km ----- Organized by ASO
maps/viewtrack/333183
After 7 stages in Italy is now the turn of ASO to organize his stages, for his first stages ASO choose a short stage but no flat kilometers, the start is from Susa (Italy) on a light ascend to Montgenevre, after this first climb the riders will reach Briancon where starts the Col du Lautaret, one of the two ascend over 2000m (2050m), after a long downhill the peloton reach Le Bourg d’Oisans where starts the final clim of L’Alpe d’Huez, no presentation needed…

Stage 9 – Gap - Malaucene – 182,5 km ----- Organized by ASO
maps/viewtrack/333271
An high mountain stage unconventional, the first 140 km with no difficult before the battle starts in Bedoin where the Mont Ventoux begins, after the climb the downhill arrive in Malaucene before the first rest day; with this long flat first part can we revive the emotions of 1994 with the glorious breakawaw of Eros Poli?

Rest day in Montpellier

Stage 10 – Montpellier - Rodez – 216 km ----- Organized by ASO
maps/viewtrack/336807
A medium mountain stage very long (the second longest) that look sto the breakaway and the Classics expert, in the last 15km there are 3 climbs (but just one categorized), that could favorite attacks, a bunch sprint isn’t an option in any cases.

Stage 11 – Albi - Saint Gaudens – 184 km ----- Organized by ASO
maps/viewtrack/337514
Sprinters are now recall in action, a stage quite completly flat with just two 4th category climbs that won’t create probelms to them, for the GC contenders an easy day before tomorrow…

Stage 12 – Bagneres de Luchon - Luz Saint Saveur – 161 km ----- Organized by ASO
maps/viewtrack/337521
The only stage on the Pyreenes won’t be easy in 161 km there are 4 iconic climbs: Port de Bales, Col de Peyressourde, Col d’Aspin and, most of all, the Col du Tourmalet, the highest climb (2088m), after the Tourmalt just 20km of downhill to Luz-Saint-Saveur.

Stage 13 – Pau - San Sebastian-Donostia – 221,5 km ----- Organized by ASO
maps/viewtrack/337590
Another medium mountain stage with the end that looks at classical expert, after the first flat 150km, the battle begins with the climbs of Jaikzibel (2nd Cat., 7,7km at 5,7%), Erlaitz (2nd Cat., 8,1km at 6,1%) and Murgil-Tontorra (3rd Cat., 5,7km at 4,1%,with the final part of 1,8km at 11,3%) usually rides during the Klasikoa, if someone can goes solo on the Murgil-Tontorra, at just 7 km from the finish line, he will probably calebrate in San Sebastian-Donostia.

Stage 14 – Bilbao-Bilbo - Los Machucos. Monumento Vaca Pasiega – 158,5 km ----- Organized by Unipublic
maps/viewtrack/337637
Another medium mountain stage where the riders will find an high number of climbs categorized and not, in the first part the only categorized climb is the Alto de Ajo (4th Cat.), but in the last part there will be three, the Alto de Fuente Las Varas (3rd Cat.) and the Puerto de la Cruz Uzano (4th Cat.) before the uphill finish to Los Machucos (8km at 8,4%).

Stage 15 – Santander - Gijon – 202,5 km ----- Organized by Unipublic
maps/viewtrack/337643
A flat stages along the nothern coast of Spain, but the sprint isn’t sure in Gijon, the two climbs in the last part of the stage could see some sprinters dropped and the won’t probably be enough kilometers to re-join the peloton.

Rest day in Gijon

Stage 16 – Gijon - Oviedo (ITT) – 30,5 km ----- Organized by Unipublic
maps/viewtrack/337652
This ITT for specialist will create big difference beetween the riders but there is enough space before for gain minutes and more space there will be for recover in next stages…

Stage 17 – Oviedo - Alto de l’Angliru – 150 km ----- Organized by Unipublic
maps/viewtrack/337666
The Queen Stage is quite short, and offers in the first part just one categorized climb, Santu Miano (3rd Cat., 5,8 km at 5,2%), but from Santa Marina,at km 103, the roads won’t never be flat, there are three climbs in rapid succession, first is the Alto de la Cobertoria (1st Cat., 14,5 km at 5,5%), then the Alto de Cordal (1st Cat., 5,7km at 8,3%) before the Alto de l’Angrilu, on the same route Alberto Contador gain his last victory during the 20th stage of Vuelta 2017. The ingredients for a spectacular stage are all there!

Stage 18 – Leon - Tordesillas – 164,5 km ----- Organized by Unipublic
maps/viewtrack/337952
For the sprinters that survive at all the previous stage is arrived their moment, three of the lat four stages are just for them, this is the first, the only critical point could by the wind…

Stage 19 – Valladolid - Plataforma de Gredos – 199 km ----- Organized by Unipublic
maps/viewtrack/338351
This is the last opportunity for the GC contenders to try to conquer the leader’s jersey, this medium mountain stage his harder than it coulds look, the first part until Pedrahita is completly flat, but can be rides at extremely high speed in order to create over effort and then battle on the Corral de la Mesta and the final climb to the Plataforma de Gredos without flat section in the beetween...

Stage 20 – Avila - Madrid – 152 km ----- Organized by Unipublic
maps/viewtrack/338627
The first celebration for the winner will be in Madrid but the two climbs in the early part of the stage could create some problems, but there is enough space to come back in the peloton, anyway, if the GC leader is in the main peloton entering Madrid he can start the celebration; but for the sprinters there won’t be celebration they will fight for the stage, and maybe for the point jersey…

Stage 21 – Compiegne - Paris (Champs Elysees) – 137,5 km ----- Organized by ASO
maps/viewtrack/338657
Now the celebration are for quite all, but the sprinters will have the last battle, the prestigious sprint on the Champs Elysees

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improb
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by improb »

maps/tours/view/14304

From Santiago de Compostela to Paris, celebrating UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. Every stage has a theme, with 18 stages out of 21 starting or finishing from a UNESCO site. This is a way to promote a collapsing tourism industry after the heavy hit it's had during the Covid 19, with many activities struggling to get through it. That's an easy to boost cultural tourism which is the easiest one to manage after the virus (more so than mass tourism towards the seaside).

7 High Mountain Stages (4; 7; 8; 13; 14; 19; 20)
5 Medium Mountain Stages (2; 9; 11; 15; 17)
7 Flat Stages (3; 5; 6; 10; 12; 18; 21)
2 ITTs (1; 16)

86 Categorized Climbs (9 HC; 15 1st Cat; 18 2nd Cat; 22 3rd Cat; 22 4th Cat)
75,3 Kms of individual time trials
Key Climbs: Lagos de Covadonga (Stage 4); Port de Larrau (Stage 7); Col du Tourmalet (Stage 8); Col de la Madeleine (Stage 13); Colle delle Finestre (Stage 14); Pian del Lupo (Stage 15); Monte Padrio and Passo del Mortirolo (Stage 19)

Also, the number of crucial stages is equally divided between all three organizers to satisfy everyone, the Vuelta has the starting ITT, a medium mountain uphill finish, two mountain stages and a white roads stage. The Tour has two mountain stages as well as two medium mountain stages and the last stage in Paris. The Giro has the queen stage, two other mountain stages, two medium mountain stages and the main ITT.

STAGE 1 - ETAPA DE PEREGRINOS (SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA ITT) - UNIPUBLIC

The race starts with a ITT, a medium lenght one, more than 20 Kms, which allows the race to showcase the area around Santiago and its UNESCO protected old town. This stage gives time trialists a headstart ahead of a very hard race and forces climbers to attack. The course is rolling but without significant climbs and still favours pure TTers over all rounders.

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STAGE 2 - ETAPA DE LA IBERIA ROMANA (LUGO - LAS MEDULAS) - UNIPUBLIC

From Lugo to Las Medulas, two iconic places of the Roman Empire in Iberia, with Lugo having the most well preserved Roman city walls in the World and Las Medulas being a large area of gold mines from which most of the Empire’s coins and wealth came from. It’s a very rolling stage until Villafranca de Bierzo after which a quick succession of four climbs follow: Paso de los Gallegos, Alto de Sobredo, Alto de la Barosa and Las Medulas. It’s a breakaway stage and Alto de Sobredo is the perfect place for attacks from the break whereas GT favourites will instead try to gain seconds on the uphill sprint to Las Medulas.

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STAGE 3 - ETAPA DEL PREROMANICO (PONFERRADA - OVIEDO) - UNIPUBLIC

From Ponferrada to Oviedo, capital of the former kingdom of the Asturias (and also of the current region), known for its Preromanesque buildings, especially for its churches (whose size and richness was impressive for its time), boasting also the oldest working drinking fountain in Europe. The stage slowly rises until Villablino from where we climb the Puerto de Somiedo and cross the Cordillera Cantabrica. From there, it’s all downhill until 40 kms to go. The last 40 kms to go have some dangers for sprinters. They are Alto de la Cabrunana (4 Kms; 6,7%) with 35 Kms and Alto de San Claudio (3,2 Kms; 4,6%) with 9 kms to go, a Poggio like climb where it’s possible to escape from the group but also very hard. Despite this two climbs, it will still most likely end in a bunch sprint

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STAGE 4 - ETAPA DE LOS PICOS DE EUROPA (OVIEDO - LAGOS DE COVADONGA) - UNIPUBLIC

First mountain stage. Goes from Oviedo to Covadonga, two key places of the Spanish Reconquista. It’s one of the shorest stage of this race, the first half of the stage is flat. After the first sprint in Colunga, the race turns inland to climb Mirador del Fitu (1st Cat; 6,7 Kms; 7,5%), descend to Arriondas and after passing Cangas de Onis and Covadonga through a flat section, the peloton has to get up on the first HC climb of the race, Lagos de Covadonga (13,2 Kms; 7,1%). The average gradient may seem weak but that’s because it flattens out at the top. The central section is 6 kms at 9,9% with one km above 13%.

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STAGE 5 - ETAPA DE LAS CUEVAS (CUEVAS DE ALTAMIRA - ATAPUERCA) - UNIPUBLIC

A stage of grottoes. From Las Cuevas de Altamira to Yacimiento de Atapuerca. Both caves or system of caves are UNESCO protected and are famous because of their rock carvings and Paleolithic/Neolitic age findings. The winner will surely be a sprinter but the stage has several climbs in it that could cause damage. In the first half, the stage goes south towards the Meseta Plateau which characterizes central Spain. To do so, the peloton climbs the 2nd Cat Hoces de Barcena. The Plateau is mostly flat but several little hills rise from it, the last of which is the famous Castillo de Burgos climb (used in the Vuelta a Burgos) which comes at 18 kms from the finish line.

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STAGE 6 - ETAPA DE LOS MONASTERIOS (BURGOS - SAN MILLAN) - UNIPUBLIC

The stage starts and ends in UNESCO sites, going from Burgos to San Millan de la Cogolla, both located on the Camino de Santiago. The race is themed around monasteries, starting from Monasterio de las Huelgas, passing through the Monasterio de la Cartuja, the Monasterio del Espino, the Monasterio de Santa Maria la Real and, finally, the Monasterio de Yuso and Suso in San Millan, who are Unesco sites because they are the origins of Castillan Spanish, the second most popular language in the world.
This stage may look easy but it isn’t. It doesn’t have any climbs but it will challenge riders. That’s because of white roads, mostly old Camino de Santiago roads. The first sector is a short one, quickly after passing through Miranda del Ebro. It’s just an appetizer, however. The other 8 sectors are all in the last 63 kms, with 20,5 Kms of them being spent on white roads. Now, of all kind of gravel stages, I love flat ones because it’s even harder for climbers to get through them (as we can see in the Grado stage in Ionica Adriatica). The key sectors will be certainly the last two: the short sector of Calle de la Costanilla (1,3 Kms) due to it being uphill and hiding some nasty gradients and the sector of Arroyo del Cordovin due to its lenght. This last sector comes only 9 kms from the finish line.

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STAGE 7 - ETAPA DE LAS ERMITAS ROMANICAS (LIZARRA - NUESTRA SENORA DE MUSKILDA) - UNIPUBLIC

The stage starts from the Navarran/Basque city of Estella/Lizarra, known as the Toledo of the North for its Romanesque churches, built to house pilgrims on the way to Santiago in the XII and XIII century. The stage follows the same direction as the Camino but on large comfortable roads, passing through Puente de la Reina (also known for its romanic bridge as well as for its churches), Alto del Perdon (3rd Cat) with its pilgrim’s monument and Pamplona. We cross the Pyrenees getting through the 3 short climbs: Erro (4th), Meskitz (4th), Ibaneta (4th). Sandwiched between these climbs is the sprint in Roncesvalles, known for its Romanesque complex of churches and for being the first Spanish village on the way to Santiago. We descend to Saint Jean Pied de Port (2nd Sprint) before hitting the French Basque climbs. First is Burdinkurutcheta (1st), then Orgambidesca (3rd) and at the end Larrau (1st; right at the border with Spain). They are on narrow (but not too much luckily) and irregular roads, often touching gradients well above 10%. Attacks should come mostly on Port de Larrau, as it crests with 22,2 Kms to go, with its last 1,5 kms averaging over 11% and a very technical descent which will be followed by only 5 kms of flat and the tough 3 kms climb to the Romanesque church of Muskilda, one of the best conserved and most beautiful in Northern Spain.

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STAGE 8 - ETAPPE DES CIRQUES (OLORON SAINTE MARIE - BARRAGE DES GLORIETTES) - ASO

Stage themed around the Cirques, amphiteatre shaped valleys formed by glacial erosion. There are three spectacular ones in area of the arrival, protected by UNESCO (Pyrenees-Mont Perdu). The stage, however, starts in Oloron Sainte Marie in the Western Pyrenees to move east until Capvern. The road is not too flat but neither too hilly, there are a few short climbs tucked in who should tire riders legs, especially those in the breakaway. The stage then turns south towards the mountains. After the sprint in Arreau, the final tryptique of climbs starts: Hourquette d’Ancizan-Tourmalet-Trimbareilles/Barrage des Gloriettes. The hardest climb is the one in between, none other than the mythical Tourmalet, one of the race’s three cols above 2000 meters. It ends with 40 kms and few riders will have survived that. The final climb is divided into two climbs: the Cote de Trimbareilles, with the first 6,5 Kms being false flat followed by three really tough kilometers before flattening out at the top and the Barrage des Gloriettes, having the toughest sections at the start and in the last 2 kms, with an easier middle section.
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STAGE 9 - ETAPPE DU SANTUAIRE (CAUTERETS - LOURDES) - ASO

Stage starts in Cauterets, a lovely spa town who’s hosted several Tour and Vuelta’s mountain stage finishes. The stage is a middle mountain one, perfect for breakaways, with several short cotes (12 of them categorized), a short Liege Bastogne Liege, one may say. We head North down the valley to Pierrefitte Nestelas and shortly after, we pass through the first couple of climbs (among which is the 3rd Cat Cote de Siriex) who should help form a good breakaway. After that, there are roughly 60 kms of flat passing through the finish line in Lourdes and the sprint in Tarbes. That is until the bottle break in Bonnemazon, after which hell starts. We go through 10 categorized climbs in the last 100 kms, often through narrow technical roads, where descents matter just as much as the climbs. Decisive attacks should come on the Cote de Germs (2,4 Kms at 8,8%) who comes with 23 kms to go. The finish is quite weird, with it having 300 meters at 5% before flattening with 250 meters to go and turning 90 degrees left quickly after. That, plus the narrow roads will make it a final where even the best sprinter can be fooled. Positioning will be key.

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REST DAY LOURDES

STAGE 10 - ETAPPE DES CATHARS (TOULOUSE - ALBI) - ASO

Stage starting from a Unesco city and ending in another. From Toulouse (Canal du Midi and Saint Sernin) to Albi, a stage featuring strongholds of the Cathar rebels in the XIII century such as Toulouse, Lavaur, Lombers and Albi. Anyway, that’s a flat short stage who will end in a bunch sprint. There’s only one difficulty in the final Albi circuit and that is the Cote de Puygouzon (1 Km; 4,7%) to be climbed two times ( the last is 13,5 Kms from the finish line)

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STAGE 11 - ETAPPE DES CAUSSES (SAINT AFFRIQUE - MENDE) - ASO

Stage starting in Saint Affrique, passing through Millau going under the iconic viaduct and entering the Causse region protected by Unesco because of its scenery and transhumance methods who have remained unaltered through the centuries. It’s a middle mountain stage, with 6 categorized climbs (5 of them 2nd category). We should get a strong break but being sandwiched in between two very easy stage, we may even get GC action. The terrain for attacks is there. The key climb of this stage is Col des Bondons (10,3 Kms; 5,5%), a two stepped climb (5 kms at 6,9%, then 2,3 Kms of flat, then 3 Kms at 7,2%), which crests with 22 Kms to go. After that, there’s a descent and the Cote de la Croix Neuve (2,1 Kms at 10,1%) with the last 600 meters at 14,1%.

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STAGE 12 - ETAPPE DU DAUPHINE (LE PUY EN VELAY - GRENOBLE) - ASO

Textbook flat stage. Hilly start coming out of Le Puy en Velay (Unesco site as one of the starting points of the Camino de Santiago) with the 2nd Cat Col de Champclause and the long false flat to Bonnet le Froid, after which there’s a long descent to Annonay and Andance and then a long flat section until Rives (1st Sprint). From there, there’s a quick descent to Vourey and the cote de Charnecles, then again a descent to Moirans and the Cote de Saint Jean de Moirans. Both of these cotes are quite hard and hit more than 10% gradients. From there last one, it’s 23 kms. The stage will most likely end in a bunch sprint but attackers and the break have a small chance.

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STAGE 13 - ETAPPE DES ALPES GREES (GRENOBLE - VALMOREL) - ASO

The first of three back to back mountain stages. Starting from Grenoble, we head North at the foothills of the Alps which are finally climbed with the Col du Grand Cucheron. This first climb won’t cause much damage but will be felt at the end of the day. After that, the riders descend to the Maurienne valley which they stay in for 20 Kms. That is, until they start climbing the 1st Cat Col de Chaussy (14,2 Kms; 7,2%), a newly paved climb, which has at its base the Lacets de Montvernier, one of the most scenical roads of France. The descent goes back to Saint Martin and then the HC Col du Madeleine (17,6 Km; 8%), cresting with 42,5 Kms to go. Some riders with a strong team of climbers may be tempted to attack from here to isolate their GC rivals. The descent is very technical and a good descender can gain even more time. It gets us to Aigueblanche where the final climb (1st Cat) to Valmorel starts (12,4 Kms; 7,2%). It’s different from the classic climb as we take a narrow steep shortcut at the start of the climb. The result is 2,5 Kms at 10,5%. The perfect launching pad for attacks before the climbs eases in.

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STAGE 14 - TAPPA DEI FORTI (SAINT JEAN DE MAURIENNE - FENESTRELLE) - RCS

Two of the three cols above 2000 meters are in this stage. It’s definitely one of the two queen stages. It starts from Saint Jean de Maurienne to follow the Maurienne valley until Modane where we start climbing. The first climb is the Montee d’Aussois , an appetizer of the Col du Mont Cenis which descends into Val di Susa. We are for the first time in Italy, in a border area very rich of forts and former military roads, built by the Savoy throughout the centuries to defend themselves from a feared French invasion. One of these military roads is nowadays one of cycling’s most famous climbs, Colle delle Finestre (HC; 18 Kms at 9,1%) with most of it being in gravel which makes it even more iconic. It tops out with 47 Kms to go. We descend through first to Usseaux and then to Fenestrelle where we pass the finish line for the first time. Fenestrelle is home to the Alps largest fortress, spanning 635 meters of drop and being 1300000 square meters with two staircases of 2500 and 4000 steps. After a short flat section to, we go back to before climbing back up towards Colle delle Finestre (from a new side), even though we stop earlier at Colle Agnelli (12,5 Kms at 6,8%). This climbs hides way tougher gradients in its average as the first 8 kms until Pra Catinat average 8,7%. From Colle Agnelli, the race descends back to the finish line on the same course as before.

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STAGE 15 - TAPPA DEL SACRO MONTE (PINEROLO - SACRO MONTE DI BELMONTE) - RCS

The stage starts from Pinerolo and moves North passing through Colletta di Cumiana (3rd Cat) and then Colle del Lys (1st Cat), after which there’s a long descent to Lanzo (1st Sprint). After that, there’s a long rolling section until Cuorgne, where the hard part of the stage starts. First is the 3rd CAT Chiesanuova, then a short descent and the hardest climb of the day, 1st Cat Pian del Lupo (9,3 Kms; 8,9%). We’re at the end of a very hard three stages and riders will be tired so whoever feels his legs and attacks from here may as well gain a shitload of time. The climb ends with 45 kms to go, followed by a very technical descent and the 2nd Cat climb to Alpette (4,5 Kms; 8,3%), ending with 18 kms to go. This is another launching pad for attacks. The descent isn’t easy either and gets us back to Cuorgne. After a shortlived section of flat, riders will have to face the final climb to Sacro Monte di Belmonte (3,9 Kms; 7,9%). This stage could be anything ranging from a crazy attack to a breakaway stage with a boring 800 meters uphill sprint. It’s like the Cividale stage in the Giro a few years back but placed after two gruelling mountain stages.

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REST DAY - ALBA/BAROLO

STAGE 16 - TAPPA DEI VINI (BAROLO - CANELLI) - RCS

The longest and most decisive time trial comes in stage 16. That’s a very long time trial (54,8 Kms) between two wine capitals (Langhe, Roero and Monferrato areas are protected by Unesco for their landscapes, a result of centuries of winemaking), Barolo (home to one of the most well regarded red wines in the world) and Canelli (home of the spumante). It’s a sort of crossover between the Barolo time trial of a few years ago and the Saltara one in 2013. The lenght as well as a similar placements of difficulties to the latter and the ambiance and hardness of the climb of the former. This is a time trial for all rounders boasting a 2nd Cat climb to Albareto della Torre (3,4 Km; 9,6%) where climbers can gain back time as well as long flat sections (36 Kms of flat) and more technical sections with up and downs. Someone like Dumoulin can gain many many minutes here on pure climbers (forcing them to attack to gain a decent cushion before the time trial as well as gain back time after it) but riders who can time trial decently like Nibali or Valverde can defend themselves. The winner deserves more than a sip of spumante.

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STAGE 17 - TAPPA DELLE REPUBBLICHE MARINARE (ACQUI TERME - GENOVA) - RCS

Rolling start, perfect to get a strong breakaway away. This stage is all about the breakaway, even though there’s a chance that a few climbers may be tempted to attack. Terrain is not lacking, the stage is sandwiched between the time trial and a pancake flat stage. There are seven categorized climbs. The first one quickly after Voltaggio is the historical Passo della Bocchetta with a technical descent, getting into a circuit where the riders have to face Monte Lavergo, Signora della Guardia (1st Cat; 6,7 Kms; 7,3%), its technical descent and then Pietralavezzara (2nd Cat; 5,9 Kms; 8,1%) who rejoins the Bocchetta descent again. They then climb Monte Lavergo and Signora della Guardia again. This last ascent comes at 27 Kms to go. It’s followed by the descent and then by the Campi climb (3rd Cat; 3,6 Km; 7,4%) at 11 kms to go. The stage celebrates Genoa (one of the largest historical centers in Europe and Unesco protected) and its history as one of the world’s most important centers of trade for centuries.

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STAGE 18 - TAPPA DEI LONGOBARDI (NOVI LIGURE - BRESCIA) - RCS

Pancake flat stage with a finish in Brescia (Unesco site for its Roman monuments as well as for its Lombards’ one having one of the largest monumental complexes of the Early Middle Ages), one of the most hit places by Covid 19. Aside from the place of arrival, the whole stage goes through the place who have suffered the most, from the province of Alessandria where the stage starts (close to the home village of Fausto Coppi) to Pavia, Codogno (1st Sprint) and Cremona (2nd Sprint).

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STAGE 19 - TAPPA DELLE INCISIONI RUPESTRI (DARFO BOARIO TERME - TIRANO) - RCS

The queen stage

Six climbs to complete the most gruelling mountain stage of the race. From Darfo Boario Terme, deep in the Valcamonica, home to the Valcamonica rock carvings (the most known of which is the Rosa Camuna, Lombardy’s main symbol) to Tirano, in the Valtellina, another valley known for its carvings (especially the ones in Grosio) and for being the starting place of the Bernina train, a marvel of engineering going up to over 2200 meters of height to descend back into Sankt Moritz, being the only train line protected by UNESCO. The stage starts with 10 Kms of flat, then the climb to Degna (2nd Cat; 6,8 Kms; 7,3%) which will get away a strong breakaway, many riders from GC teams will try to sneak to help their leaders later on. After the descent, the climb to Cimbergo starts (1st Cat; 7,4 Kms; 8%), then a technical descent to Cedegolo, another 10 kms in the valley until Malonno and the climb to Comparte (4,4 Kms; 8,1%). The descent leads to Sonico and then to Edolo, a well known place in the Giro as the Passo dell’Aprica (usually ridden after Mortirolo) starts here. We follow the same route as Aprica until Corteno Golgi where we turn right to face a new climb, Monte Padrio (9,5 Kms; 9,5%), basically a mini Mortirolo up the other side of the mountain. At the top, we have a false flat to Trivigno from where we descend to Tirano passing through the finish line for the first time. We follow the Valtellina main road to Mazzo where the classic side of the Mortirolo starts (12,2 Kms; 10,7%), a climb so legendary it needs no presentation. It ends with 55 kms to go. We descend to Monno and then to Edolo to climb towards Monte Padrio again and finish in Tirano.

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STAGE 20 - TAPPA DEI FORTI BERGAMASCHI (SONDRIO - BERGAMO) - RCS

The stage starts in Sondrio and follows the main Valtellina road (except for a short climb to Castione Andevenno, the perfect place to start the breakaway) until Colico where the peloton has to turn south to follow the shores of Lake Como until Lecco. That’s where the climbing starts. In quick succession, Ballabio and Carenno to warm legs and then we follow a similar route to Giro di Lombardia when it finishes in Bergamo with Passo di Valcava (the last HC; 11,3 Kms; 8,3%), a technical descent to Capezzone, Foppo (a harder version of the climb of Brembilla), Sant’Antonio Abbandonato (1st Cat; 6 Kms; 9,2%) and Miragolo (1st Cat; 8,2 Kms; 7%). These last two climbs should prove decisive (bar a suicide attack on Valcava but you need a strong team for that) for whoever wants a last attempt to win the GC. They come respectively 48 and 30 kms to the line. Miragolo is followed after a very short descent by a short climb to Selvino who follows a different, much steeper road (3rd Cat; 2,8 Kms; 8,4%) than Lombardia. This climb is 24 kms to the line, followed by 13 kms of descent. We then pass by Nembro and Alzano (both are the most affected towns by the Covid 19 epidemic in the whole of Italy) with 10 kms of flat, straight roads until the eastern outskirts of Bergamo from where the final climb to Bergamo Alta starts (4th Cat; 1,1 Kms; 7,3%)

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STAGE 21 - ETAPPE DES LUMIERES (VERSAILLES - PARIS) - ASO

The classical final Champs Elysees stage. From Versailles to Paris to celebrate the art of the Enlightened City.

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Last edited by improb on 25/04/2020, 23:50, edited 1 time in total.

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Piet_Agoras
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Posts: 7
Joined: 16/04/2018, 10:48

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Piet_Agoras »

taaramae_crack wrote:
17/04/2020, 19:47
Piet_Agoras wrote:
17/04/2020, 17:25
Hi guys,
This is my proposal for the Grand Grand Tour.
maps/tours/view/14172

(I will present it beter later on, but here are the key statistics:)
0 long transfers (exept the Paris one)
1 TTT
2 ITT
3 Capitals united
4 One-day Classics honored
5 High Mountain Stages (3x Top finish)
6 Medium Mountain Stages (4x Top finish)
7 Flat Stages
3287 Total km's
Hi! I watched your route and I noticed that in the second stage you are finishing on Valle de los Caídos (what you called "Monasterio de Santa Cruz"). I don't know if you are aware of what actually that is, but it's not definetly a good idea finishing a stage there :lol: So you might consider deleting or changing that final climb.
I was not aware of the political meaning of this place. On the topomap it says "Monasterio de Santa Cruz", which translates to Cloister. I will, off course, change this immediatly.

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Piet_Agoras
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Posts: 7
Joined: 16/04/2018, 10:48

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Piet_Agoras »

Presentation of my Grand Grand Tour:
0 long transfers (except the Paris one)
1 TTT
2 ITT
3 Capitals united
4 One-day Classics honored
5 High Mountain Stages (3x Top finish)
6 Medium Mountain Stages (3x Top finish)
7 Flat Stages
3272 Total km's

Stages 1-8: Unipublic
Stages 9-13 + 21: ASO
Stages 14-20: RCS

GRAND GRAND TOUR
maps/tours/view/14172

Stage 1
An relative short and easy Team Time Trial in the center of Madrid to start this grand tour. Similar to the one we had in Brussels.
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Stage 2
Sunday = funday, except for the GC-riders. They will immediately face the first climb of category 1 on their way to the summer palace of La Granja. The breakaway might get an advantage on the rolling character of the middle km's.
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Stage 3
First flat stage with a long straight finish in Palencia. This screams for a royal sprint.
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Stage 4
In this second flat stage we descend from the central Spanish plateau to the coast. Literally. Because the finish will be next to the beach in Gijon.
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Stage 5
Yesterday we drove around the starting place of today in Oviedo. Today we will have a rollercoasterride in Asturias with a finish on the Lagos de Covadonga. The bonussprint wil be located on top the Alto de LLueves, a typical short Spanish steep climb.
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Stage 6
A coastal ride to get to the Basque country. Not the easiest ride, but nevertheless a sprint is expected in Bilbao, the city that was planned to be one of the cities of the EURO2020 tournament.
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Stage 7
Today, we honour the Classica San Sebastian. Due the known reasons, this oneday classic did not take place this year. We use the same finish, but only the last 10k are the same as the classic. Coming from Vitoria, we use a totally different route trough the Basque country. A stage for the breakaway climbers as they will tackle for instance this horrific climb:
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Stage 8
The first stage on French soil is a Pyrenees classic containing the Aubisqe and the Tourmalet. The Col de Trabaou might sound unfamiliar, but it is actually two thirds of the climb to Luz-Ardiden. The bonussprint is placed in the middle of the Tourmalet to encourage the GC-riders to attack from far.
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Stage 9
The last day before the first restday is a short explosive stage with a finish on the Col de Menté. As with most High Mountain Stages, the intermediate sprint is placed early, so that all the sprinters can go full gas for the green jersey.
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Monday = restday

Stage 10
A stage with no special difficulties. time again for the sprinters to shine.
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Stage 11
A total flat 45km ITT followed by a spectacular 1.5km climb in Sète. The Mont-Saint-Clair wil be the finish of this TT for the power guys. Long straights dominate this course.
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Stage 12
While looking at the profile, this might look like another easy flat stage. But the winds may totally change that. If the mistral blows though the Camargue, we are in for an echelon-treat.
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Stage 13
We could easely nickname this stage "The Verdon stage". We will follow this wild river for a very long time and by doing that we create the perfect playground for strong breakaway-riders like De Gendt. The finish will be in Valberg, by far not the hardest climb in the Alps, but perfect to create some tension.
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Stage 14
La Primavera will be ridden on a saturday again! Well, sort of. The first stage in Italy has a very familiar last 65km, but the first 55km with two C1-climbs shake things up. The sprinters wont be able to follow the bunch there, but are the able to get back in time for the Cipressa? Is the breakaway going to hold on the Poggio when the GC-riders go for the bonus? Will there be a royal sprint on the Via Roma? A lot of questions to answer...
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Stage 15
Another short explosive mountainstage on a Sunday. This time riders tackle 112km between Loano and Prato Nevoso. While going up and down all the time, the GC-riders will surely play their cards on the day before the second restday.
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Monday = restday

Stage 16
This stage offers the last opportunity for sprinters to win before Paris. It's the longest stage of this Tour. However, the teams of sprinters should catch the breakaway before the Monte Quiesa, or they are in for a surpise.
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Stage 17
The Strade Bianche stage. 174km with 60km of strade is close to the real thing. There are only 7 sectors but, except the first one, they are all longer then 7km. And just as the real thing, we will finish uphill (but not as steep) in Montepulciano.
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Stage 18
The final week is a hard one, and this stage is not different. It's a classic 220km RCS-Mountainstage with a profile which you can use to comb your hair. The Terminillo is the last HC-climb of this tour, but we won't finish it an Campoforgna as usual. Instead we climb further, go over the top and finish downhill in Leonessa.
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Stage 19
Last chance for the climbers to gain some time on the TT specialist for tomorrow. The finish is in Campaegli after a 17km climb. In fact 71km of this stage is going uphill. These are however not the steepest climbs. On very steep climbs, you can get away and win seconds. On these kind of climbs, you win minutes. The riders who have still the most gas in the tank after 3 weeks will win this stage.
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Stage 20
A flat ITT in the streets of Roma to give a chance to the more TT-types of GC-riders to ultimately take the victory home.
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Stage 21
Not much to explain here. We start in Compiègne where normally Paris-Roubaix would start. And from there we ride towards the Champs-Elysees for the final sprint of this Grand Tour!
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