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Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

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Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by emmea90 »

Image
Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours

Due to Covid-19 pandemic spreading in 2020 both Giro d'Italia and Tour de France were cancelled. Vuelta also had to be postponed by 20 days.

ASO, RCS and Unipublic gets to an agreement to organize one single Grand Tour in september with parts of all the three tours.

ASO also gets to end the Grand Tour in Paris, with the classic Champs-Elysees stage. Due to this, you have to end stage 20 in a way to arrange a realistic transfer to Paris in the evening/morning after the stage (ending near an airport, an high velocity train station if in France, etc).

You have to spilt the stages during the 21 days in an equal stages, possibly avoiding big plane transfers (except for the Paris stage)

Route should be designed in respect of the UCI limit of 3500 Km for a Grand Tour.

You have also to take into account that the Grand Tour will be held in september, so you have to avoid climbs over 2500m and you have to limit climbs over 2000m at 3 maximum.

It shall be clear who organize what stage between RCS, ASO and Unipublic organizes what stage and the total shall be 7 for each organizer. It's not forbidden to go in other countries but it shall be clear who is the organizer - for example, a stage that goes into Andorra, can be organized by both ASO and Unipublic but a stage with the majority of that in Italy shall be organized only by RCS.

Please write in stage the description which is the organizer of each stage.

Please use for the Grand Tour the Tour de France 2019 profile.

Evaluation shall take into account
- Grand Tour balancing
- Realism of the transfers and the stage
- Satisfaction of the organizers
- Key stages in the weekend and not having too many "flat/sprint" stages in a row

Deadline will be on april 25, h 23.59
Software Engineer, Cycling Fanatic

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mike4296
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by mike4296 »

improb wrote:
17/04/2020, 14:01
mike4296 wrote:
10/04/2020, 11:50
Hey all! Only a pandemic could make me come back to tracking after basically a 2 years hiatus. In the forthcoming days I'll show you my route but, for now, I'll leave you with a preview... :beer:

Image
I had used Monte Padrio (still undecided exactly for this reason) as well in one of my stages but don't you think it's too narrow? I guess it may be fine as a climb but less so as a descent
As ellvey and davandluz rightly said, narrow roads are not a problem themselves; they might be a problem in the final part of flat stages, where the peloton is supposed to have many riders and go at high speed, and especially in steep descents: but the descent of Padrio, despite being quite steep, has not high gradients, so no problem imho ;)

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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by mike4296 »

First of all, some comments on a copy-pasted old post of mine:
1. The "Big Start" is hosted by a city or a region. If the first stage is a prologue it would be better something atypical, not foreseeable. Hilly roads, cobblestones, corners are perfect for a good prologue, which mustn't block the traffic anyway. In this case, Mallorca hosts the big start: an island that has been investing money in cycling for decades, with a great tourist patrimony to show, with a very friendly weather even in the last months of the year.
2. A GPM in the second or, better, first stage. It doesn't matter if you put it on a bridge or a flyover, just put it somewhere as soon as possible.
3. No to 5 high mountain stages in a row. 3 is enough, 4 is ok only if there is an easy one (something like Peio Terme in 2010, or Macugnaga in 2011).
4. A GT needs time trial. At least 60 kilometers, even though it depends on the amount of climbing in the route.
5. No flat stages on Sundays (9th and 15th stage).
6. No arrivals in small unknown villages with no touristic value - I start from Sa Calobra, basically a beach, and Alcalà del Jucar, 700 people, but with a huge touristic value for respectively Mallorca island and the region of Aragòn. Same for Arreau: in this case it is not really about the town itself, but the valley, Vallée d'Aure.

P.S.: there could be very very small tracking refuses due to the not perfect operating of the editor.
P.P.S.: I beg your pardon if I forgot some simbols on city names in the stages graphic :mrgreen:

Now, the race (open the spoiler for stages profiles, as well as the tour direct link):

Image
Spoiler!

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sportdani19
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by sportdani19 »

mike4296 wrote:
22/04/2020, 16:52
First of all, some comments on a copy-pasted old post of mine:
1. The "Big Start" is hosted by a city or a region. If the first stage is a prologue it would be better something atypical, not foreseeable. Hilly roads, cobblestones, corners are perfect for a good prologue, which mustn't block the traffic anyway. In this case, Mallorca hosts the big start: an island that has been investing money in cycling for decades, with a great tourist patrimony to show, with a very friendly weather even in the last months of the year.
2. A GPM in the second or, better, first stage. It doesn't matter if you put it on a bridge or a flyover, just put it somewhere as soon as possible.
3. No to 5 high mountain stages in a row. 3 is enough, 4 is ok only if there is an easy one (something like Peio Terme in 2010, or Macugnaga in 2011).
4. A GT needs time trial. At least 60 kilometers, even though it depends on the amount of climbing in the route.
5. No flat stages on Sundays (9th and 15th stage).
6. No arrivals in small unknown villages with no touristic value - I start from Sa Calobra, basically a beach, and Alcalà del Jucar, 700 people, but with a huge touristic value for respectively Mallorca island and the region of Aragòn. Same for Arreau: in this case it is not really about the town itself, but the valley, Vallée d'Aure.

P.S.: there could be very very small tracking refuses due to the not perfect operating of the editor.
P.P.S.: I beg your pardon if I forgot some simbols on city names in the stages graphic :mrgreen:

Now, the race (open the spoiler for stages profiles, as well as the tour direct link):

Image
Spoiler!
3 problems
First: all stages must be With Tour de France 2019 Profile.
Second: The is Laner Alm is not like plan de corones,is Strada Forestale.
Third: The link of your Tour

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ellvey
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by ellvey »

sportdani19 wrote:
22/04/2020, 18:13
mike4296 wrote:
22/04/2020, 16:52
First of all, some comments on a copy-pasted old post of mine:
1. The "Big Start" is hosted by a city or a region. If the first stage is a prologue it would be better something atypical, not foreseeable. Hilly roads, cobblestones, corners are perfect for a good prologue, which mustn't block the traffic anyway. In this case, Mallorca hosts the big start: an island that has been investing money in cycling for decades, with a great tourist patrimony to show, with a very friendly weather even in the last months of the year.
2. A GPM in the second or, better, first stage. It doesn't matter if you put it on a bridge or a flyover, just put it somewhere as soon as possible.
3. No to 5 high mountain stages in a row. 3 is enough, 4 is ok only if there is an easy one (something like Peio Terme in 2010, or Macugnaga in 2011).
4. A GT needs time trial. At least 60 kilometers, even though it depends on the amount of climbing in the route.
5. No flat stages on Sundays (9th and 15th stage).
6. No arrivals in small unknown villages with no touristic value - I start from Sa Calobra, basically a beach, and Alcalà del Jucar, 700 people, but with a huge touristic value for respectively Mallorca island and the region of Aragòn. Same for Arreau: in this case it is not really about the town itself, but the valley, Vallée d'Aure.

P.S.: there could be very very small tracking refuses due to the not perfect operating of the editor.
P.P.S.: I beg your pardon if I forgot some simbols on city names in the stages graphic :mrgreen:

Now, the race (open the spoiler for stages profiles, as well as the tour direct link):

Image
Spoiler!
3 problems
First: all stages must be With Tour de France 2019 Profile.
Second: The is Laner Alm is not like plan de corones,is Strada Forestale.
Third: The link of your Tour
Regarding Laner Alm, when they climbed Passo di Pampeago back in 2012, they actually descended through this exact same road, so if they did that in real life, i think it should be fine for them to use it as a climb xD

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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by mike4296 »

sportdani19 wrote:
22/04/2020, 18:13
mike4296 wrote:
22/04/2020, 16:52
First of all, some comments on a copy-pasted old post of mine:
1. The "Big Start" is hosted by a city or a region. If the first stage is a prologue it would be better something atypical, not foreseeable. Hilly roads, cobblestones, corners are perfect for a good prologue, which mustn't block the traffic anyway. In this case, Mallorca hosts the big start: an island that has been investing money in cycling for decades, with a great tourist patrimony to show, with a very friendly weather even in the last months of the year.
2. A GPM in the second or, better, first stage. It doesn't matter if you put it on a bridge or a flyover, just put it somewhere as soon as possible.
3. No to 5 high mountain stages in a row. 3 is enough, 4 is ok only if there is an easy one (something like Peio Terme in 2010, or Macugnaga in 2011).
4. A GT needs time trial. At least 60 kilometers, even though it depends on the amount of climbing in the route.
5. No flat stages on Sundays (9th and 15th stage).
6. No arrivals in small unknown villages with no touristic value - I start from Sa Calobra, basically a beach, and Alcalà del Jucar, 700 people, but with a huge touristic value for respectively Mallorca island and the region of Aragòn. Same for Arreau: in this case it is not really about the town itself, but the valley, Vallée d'Aure.

P.S.: there could be very very small tracking refuses due to the not perfect operating of the editor.
P.P.S.: I beg your pardon if I forgot some simbols on city names in the stages graphic :mrgreen:

Now, the race (open the spoiler for stages profiles, as well as the tour direct link):

Image
Spoiler!
3 problems
First: all stages must be With Tour de France 2019 Profile.
Second: The is Laner Alm is not like plan de corones,is Strada Forestale.
Third: The link of your Tour
1) They are, I just changed them for a better presentation here in the topic ;)
2) Of course it is not like Plan de Corones, this is much better... 100% tarmac and without mountain bike-like gradients :asd: It is along the descent of Passo Pampeago, streetview is available there and this is where the finish line is:
Image
3) What's the problem here?

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AjachiChakrabarti
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by AjachiChakrabarti »

AjachiChakrabarti wrote:
09/04/2020, 4:20
Here's my entry: maps/tours/view/14364

STAGE 1 (RCS): Saturday, 5 Sep
Venice > Ravenna: 177.95 Km
maps/viewtrack/336688
The race begins in Venice and heads down the coast to Ravenna for a sprint finish next to the mausoleum of Theodoric the Great. Although the stage is pan flat, never going higher than sea level, the coastal route and open landscape create the possibility of echelons, should one team decide to test everyone's legs.
Image

STAGE 2 (RCS): Sunday, 6 Sep
Ravenna > Mantua: 173.33 Km
maps/viewtrack/336687
From the Roman fortress of Ravenna, we head to the Austrian fortress of Mantua, so crucial to the Italian wars of unification. Another flat stage ends with a sprint finish at the ducal palace, with a bridge complicating matters in the final three kilometres.
Image

STAGE 3 (RCS): Monday, 7 Sep
Verona > Verona: 33.88 Km (TTT)
maps/viewtrack/336685
Stage 3 is a team time trial around Verona, starting and finishing at the Piazza Pradaval. After leaving Verona, the route climbs up to Montecchio, with slopes reaching 10% at places, which will force teams to strategise about how much dead weight they can carry.
Image

STAGE 4 (RCS): Tuesday, 8 Sep
Verona > Merano: 178.33 Km
maps/viewtrack/336682
The race heads into the Alps, albeit with another likely sprint finish at Merano, in South Tyrol. The stage, which is entirely sloping gently uphill, features the first KOM point of the race, with a fourth-category climb near the finish.
Image

STAGE 5 (RCS): Wednesday, 9 Sep
Bormio > Prato Maslino: 139.27 Km
maps/viewtrack/336659
The climbing begins in earnest with a very difficult Alpine stage. It begins in Bormio, usually the launchpad for the Gavia, but since that is off limits, we head south to the Mortirolo before turning west. After the second-category Passo del'Aprica and the first-category climb to San Giovanni, the first mountain-top finish of the race takes place on Prato Maslino, a 10 km climb at an average gradient of over 13%.
Image

STAGE 6 (RCS): Thursday, 10 Sep
Lecco > Turin: 196.85 Km
maps/viewtrack/336627
One last chance for the sprinters in the first week, as the race heads to Turin. Four ninety-degree turns in the final kilometre will make placement in the bunch crucial.
Image

STAGE 7 (RCS): Friday, 11 Sep
Ivrea > Planaval: 153.75 Km
maps/viewtrack/336587
The final Italian stage of the race heads back into the mountains, this time in the Aosta Valley on the French border. The stage features three first-category climbs, finishing on top of Planaval.
Image

STAGE 8 (ASO): Saturday, 12 Sep
Bourg-Saint-Maurice > Valloire: 133.01 Km
maps/viewtrack/336551
The French leg of the race begins in Bourg-Saint-Maurice. The stage quickly heads uphill with the first-category Col du Pradier, which is followed by the HC Col de la Madeleine. The final climb of the day is the Telegraphe, with eight bonus seconds up for grabs at the top, before a quick descent into Valloire for the finish.
Image

STAGE 9 (ASO): Sunday, 13 Sep
Albertville > Alpe d'Huez: 146.43 Km
maps/viewtrack/336533
We round out the weekend with another Alpine stage. Beginning in Albertville, this is a traditional Alpe d'Huez stage, with the Lacets de Montvernier and the Croix de Fer as appetisers.
Image

REST DAY: Monday, 14 Sep

STAGE 10 (ASO): Tuesday, 15 Sep
Gap > Marseille: 194.27 Km
maps/viewtrack/336386
After the rest day at Gap, we leave the Alps behind at a fast pace, with the stage almost entirely downhill until we reach Marseille. The stage finishes in front of the hippodrome.
Image

STAGE 11 (ASO): Wednesday, 16 Sep
Nimes > Carcassonne: 210.06 Km
maps/viewtrack/336382
Another flat stage with the possibility of crosswind chaos, as we follow the coast and open countryside from Nimes to Carcassonne. At 210 km, this is the longest stage of the race.
Image

STAGE 12 (ASO): Thursday, 17 Sep
Toulouse - Place du Capitole > Toulouse - Basilique Saint-Sernin: 20.11 Km (ITT)
maps/viewtrack/336380
The first individual time trial of the race is entirely within the city of Toulouse. Bike handling will be as important as wattage on this twisty street circuit.
Image

STAGE 13 (ASO): Friday, 18 Sep
Tarbes > Hautacam: 129.63 Km
maps/viewtrack/336351
The only stage in the French Pyrenees starts at Tarbes. After a couple of early fourth-category climbs and the intermediate sprint comes the first big test: the Col d'Aubisque. This is followed by the third-category Col de Soulor and a long descent before the stage finishes on top of Hautacam.
Image

STAGE 14 (Unipublic): Saturday, 19 Sep
Arette > Donostia: 198.04 Km
maps/viewtrack/336253
The race heads into Spain, crossing the border on top of the Col d'Ispeguy. This weekend is dedicated to the Classica San Sebastian, which also had to be cancelled because of the pandemic, with the race finishing with the Murgil and the familiar downhill run into Donostia.
Image

STAGE 15 (Unipublic): Sunday, 20 Sep
Donostia > Arrate: 161.08 Km
maps/viewtrack/335878
This difficult stage features nine of the Basque country's many iconic hills, beginning with the Jaizkibel and ending on top of the Arrate.
Image

STAGE 16 (Unipublic): Monday, 21 Sep
Bilbao > Reinosa: 177.74 Km
maps/viewtrack/335805
The final week of the race begins in Bilbao. We head along the coast to Santander before turning inland towards the finish at Reinosa. The last third of the stage is almost entirely uphill, but not steep enough to entirely rule out a sprint finish. A breakaway staying away is probably the likeliest outcome, though, with the major teams trying to conserve energy for the trials ahead.
Image

STAGE 17 (Unipublic): Tuesday, 22 Sep
Guardo > Alto de l'Angliru: 159.59 Km
maps/viewtrack/335781
The first 100 km of the stage are lumpy plateau roads, before a long descent brings us to the foot of the first-category Alto del Cordal, which comes with a bonification at the top. The stage ends on top of the dreaded Angliru.
Image

STAGE 18 (Unipublic): Wednesday, 23 Sep
Oviedo > San Emiliano: 133.92 Km
maps/viewtrack/335841
After the Angliru, this stage features three other famous Asturian climbs: the Cobertoria, the Puerto de San Lorenzo and La Farrapona. The last of these is followed by a 15 km downhill run to the finish at San Emiliano.
Image

REST DAY: Thursday, 24 Sep

STAGE 19 (Unipublic): Friday, 25 Sep
Santa Cruz de Tenerife > Santa Cruz de Tenerife: 52.29 Km (ITT)
maps/viewtrack/335605
From the Asturias airport at Oviedo, we hop onto a flight to the Canary Islands for the final two stages, which will decide the winner of the race. First, we have a long time trial looping around Santa Cruz de Tenerife, heading up and down the Pico del Ingles.
Image

STAGE 20 (Unipublic): Saturday, 26 Sep
San Cristobal de La Laguna > Observatorio Astronomico del Teide: 120.69 Km
maps/viewtrack/335498
The race reaches a climax with a short stage featuring two of the toughest climbs in all of Spain. First up is the climb to Puerto Izana, with stretches in excess of 20%. A 40 km descent brings us back to the coast, where we double back and make the tortuous climb to the Teide observatory, over 18 km long at an average gradient of 12.6%.
Image

STAGE 21 (ASO): Sunday, 27 Sep
Rambouillet > Paris - Champs Elysees: 112.26 Km
maps/viewtrack/335342
After two gruelling stages in the Canary Islands, we hop back on a plane to Paris for the traditional Champs Elysees stage.
Image
Edited Stage 18 to avoid an unpaved descent near the finish. It now finishes on top of La Farrapona. Since admins haven't ruled my transfer to the Canary Islands as against the rules, I'm sticking to the route for Stages 19 and 20.

STAGE 18 (Unipublic): Wednesday, 23 Sep
Oviedo > La Farrapona: 118.40 Km
maps/viewtrack/335841
Image

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ColDuRosier
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by ColDuRosier »

maps/tours/view/14268

Il Grandissimo 2020

Saturday Stage 1 (RCS) - TTT, 37km: Bergamo - Bergamo Alta

Image

Start at the Via Roma, finish at the Piazza Vecchio in the old Citta Alta. The choice for Bergamo as Grande Partenza / Grand Départ is twofold: the corona crisis has hit Bergamo the hardest and this Grand Tour would like to remember those who we lost. Felice Gimondi is not one of those we lost to the virus, but we lost this true Campionissimo nevertheless. In and ideal world, the first yellow jersey will be awarded by Eddy Merckx, who was too heartbroken to attend the funeral of his rival and good friend.

Sunday Stage 2 (RCS) - Flat, 175km: Sedrina (Memorial Felice Gimondi) - Fidenza

Image

The start is situated in the birthtown of Felice Gimondi, where a memorial to Gimondi will be unveiled. We pass through Lodi, one of the first towns to be hit hard by the corona virus and we slowly leave Lombardia behind after that. The finish is placed in Fidenza and it will probably be a sprint there. In true Giro d'Italia fashion though, 3 small hills along the way will make sure the sprinters have to work to earn their shot at the victory.

Monday Stage 3 (RCS) - Hill, 209km: Parma - Prato

Image

This stage seems to have 3 possible outcomes: this could be a stage for the De Gendts of this world, for the fast guys who like a couple of climbs or, if the tempo drops after Abetone, for the real big sprinting powerhouses. The teams dedicated to one fast guy will make the difference here, either in distancing other sprinters or in catching up on the peloton.

Tuesday Stage 4 (RCS) - Hill, 152km: Firenze - Montalcino

Image

We all remember the Strade Bianche, but perhaps the most famous 'white' face is that of world champion Cadel Evans, winning the stage to Montalcino in the Giro of 2010 in the rain. 10 years later, we are back on white roads towards Montalcino. Personal favourite for the stage? Tiesj Benoot.

Wednesday Stage 5 (RCS) - Flat, 194km: Cecina - Chiavari

Image

After the first uphill finish, the peloton has to set course towards France. A stage along the coast of the Thyrrenean Sea is the result, but wind and the rough coastline near La Spezia will make sure this isn't a walk in the park. If this doesn't split the pack, a sprint is expected.

Thursday Stage 6 (RCS) - Hill, 199km: Chiavari - Bra

Image

From Chiavari, we set course towards the Alps. After a dash along the coast, the Passo del Turchino (a wink to Milano-San Remo) is the portal towards the Po valley. The stage is open for different scenarios, even a bunch sprint. When entering Bra, watch out for that crest, which could spark some attacks and hurt the already tired sprinters.

Friday Stage 7 (RCS) - Mountain, 154km: Frossano - Sauze d'Oulx

Image

We're going out (of Italy) with a bang. The first mountain stage of this grand tour is here: after passing Pinerolo, the riders will face the steep Pramartino, followed by a less known part of the Colle delle Finestre (Pian dell'Alpe), Sestrière and the final encore to Sauze d'Oulx. This will hurt even the lightest of riders. After today the battle for the GC will really start to heat up.

Saturday Stage 8 (ASO) - Mountain, 183km: Briançon - Tallard

Image

After the Italian finale, this stage should be suited to the escapees. A brave GC contender could try to take some time here, but the majority will probably wait for tomorrow. The final climb will still provide the spectacle we expect from a Saturday stage.

Sunday Stage 9 (ASO) - Mountain, 155km: Sisteron - Mont Ventoux

Image

Don't be fooled by the finish alone, the entire stage is a big test for the riders. After the Col du Négron, the peloton tackles the Col de la Liguière,
followed by the Mur de Monieux and the Col de Notre Dame des Abeilles in quick succession on often small and winding roads. After that, the giant awaits
and then finally a rest day. Some will need it.

Monday Rest day - Carpentras

Tuesday Stage 10 (ASO) - Flat, 155km: Avignon - Cap d'Agde

Image

If the mistral winds are blowing favourably, this could be the most spectacular stage of them all. The favourite today? Whichever sprinter Deceuninck - Quick Step has selected for this tour.

Wednesday Stage 11 (ASO) - Hill, 216km: Agde - Perpignan

Image

We cover more ground towards Spain with a stage passing through the foothills of the Pyrennees. De Marchi, De Gendt, Trentin are among the favourites here, or will Sagan provide us with another of his special efforts?

Thursday Stage 12 (ASO) - ITT 47km, Perpignan - Le Perthus

Image

Starting at the wonderful Palais des Rois de Majorque, the riders will tackle the only individual time trial in this tour. Unlike some recent Tours, it's a long one which should make the Quintana's of this world nervous.

Friday Stage 13 (Unipublic) - Flat 170km, Figueres - Barcelona (Font Màgica)

Image

We salute the Volta a Catalunya today with a finish in Barcelona, after the climb towards Montjuic Castle.

Saturday Stage 14 (Unipublic) - Hill 226km, Reus - Mas de la Costa

Image

A grand tour in Spain without some idiotic gradients on a goat path isn't a grand tour. And behold: Mas de la Costa fills this gap nicely.

Sunday Stage 15 (Unipublic) - Mountain 186km, Castellón de la Plana - Aliaga

Image

The Alto de San Cristóbal concludes the 3rd weekend. This climb doesn't seem to rough, but it contains two kilometres with gradients above 12%. The descent towards Aliaga isn't technical, but could decide the winner today.

Monday Rest Day - Zaragoza

Tuesday Stage 16 (Unipublic) - Flat 214km, Zaragoza - Logroño

Image

The sprinters will have another shot at the victory today, as some have been waiting since the stage to Cap d'Agde.

Wednesday Stage 17 (Unipublic) - Hill 166km, Logroño - Bilbao

Image

If the pure climbers are still trailing after that long time trial, they will have to try something on the final climb towards Bilbao. The stage victory will probably go to one of the early escapees.

Thursday Stage 18 (Unipublic) - Hill 181km, Igorre - Donostia

Image

The start is located in Igorre, a former host of a Cyclocross World Cup race. The finish is located in Donostia, or San Sebastián, host of the Klasikoa. The riders will tackle the Murgil Tontorra 3 times in the final. This may not be a mountain stage, but it will hurt a lot.

Friday Stage 19 (Unipublic) - Hill 219km, Irun - Jaca

Image

This is the 7th and last stage organised by Unipublic. The riders will ride towards Jaca, not to far from the French border. If the sprinters are not too tired, this could be an opportunity. On the way, they will have to survive the Alto de las Coronas though. Symbolic.

Saturday Stage 20 (ASO) - Mountain, 100km: Bedous - Hautacam

Image

Short, steep, hard and a lot of pain. 3 big climbs separate the riders from the easy ride to Paris. The yellow yersey will have to battle to the end to secure the win.

Sunday Stage 21 (ASO) - Flat, 81km: Vincennes (Vélodrome Jacques Anquetil) - Paris (Champs Elysées)

Image

The final stage is even shorter than other years, with more laps on the Champs Élysées. 20km of sipping fake champagne in front of the camera should be enough. The start is held at the old Vélodrome in Vincennes, where Tours of the 60s and 70s had their final conclusion.

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kanon16
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by kanon16 »

mike4296 wrote:
22/04/2020, 21:52
sportdani19 wrote:
22/04/2020, 18:13
mike4296 wrote:
22/04/2020, 16:52
First of all, some comments on a copy-pasted old post of mine:
1. The "Big Start" is hosted by a city or a region. If the first stage is a prologue it would be better something atypical, not foreseeable. Hilly roads, cobblestones, corners are perfect for a good prologue, which mustn't block the traffic anyway. In this case, Mallorca hosts the big start: an island that has been investing money in cycling for decades, with a great tourist patrimony to show, with a very friendly weather even in the last months of the year.
2. A GPM in the second or, better, first stage. It doesn't matter if you put it on a bridge or a flyover, just put it somewhere as soon as possible.
3. No to 5 high mountain stages in a row. 3 is enough, 4 is ok only if there is an easy one (something like Peio Terme in 2010, or Macugnaga in 2011).
4. A GT needs time trial. At least 60 kilometers, even though it depends on the amount of climbing in the route.
5. No flat stages on Sundays (9th and 15th stage).
6. No arrivals in small unknown villages with no touristic value - I start from Sa Calobra, basically a beach, and Alcalà del Jucar, 700 people, but with a huge touristic value for respectively Mallorca island and the region of Aragòn. Same for Arreau: in this case it is not really about the town itself, but the valley, Vallée d'Aure.

P.S.: there could be very very small tracking refuses due to the not perfect operating of the editor.
P.P.S.: I beg your pardon if I forgot some simbols on city names in the stages graphic :mrgreen:

Now, the race (open the spoiler for stages profiles, as well as the tour direct link):

Image
Spoiler!
3 problems
First: all stages must be With Tour de France 2019 Profile.
Second: The is Laner Alm is not like plan de corones,is Strada Forestale.
Third: The link of your Tour
1) They are, I just changed them for a better presentation here in the topic ;)
2) Of course it is not like Plan de Corones, this is much better... 100% tarmac and without mountain bike-like gradients :asd: It is along the descent of Passo Pampeago, streetview is available there and this is where the finish line is:
Image
3) What's the problem here?
Hi! I think you should to change the downhill from Monte Grappa in stage N. 19...the segment from SP148 to Campo Croce is a narrow gravel road...Why not the descent to Romano d'Ezzelino?

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mike4296
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Joined: 07/04/2014, 16:13

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by mike4296 »

kanon16 wrote:
23/04/2020, 14:56
mike4296 wrote:
22/04/2020, 21:52
sportdani19 wrote:
22/04/2020, 18:13


3 problems
First: all stages must be With Tour de France 2019 Profile.
Second: The is Laner Alm is not like plan de corones,is Strada Forestale.
Third: The link of your Tour
1) They are, I just changed them for a better presentation here in the topic ;)
2) Of course it is not like Plan de Corones, this is much better... 100% tarmac and without mountain bike-like gradients :asd: It is along the descent of Passo Pampeago, streetview is available there and this is where the finish line is:
Image
3) What's the problem here?
Hi! I think you should to change the downhill from Monte Grappa in stage N. 19...the segment from SP148 to Campo Croce is a narrow gravel road...Why not the descent to Romano d'Ezzelino?
I'm afraid I have to disagree with you, 2 winters ago I cycled on that road myself and it is well paved. It was used for an amateur event few years ago too zizi
I wanted to descend on Semonzo because the road is much more technical, with more hairpins and steeper gradients.

EDIT: actually the road on the map is not the road that I meant to pass through, so thanks for the warning!

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Carlo33
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Carlo33 »

My Grand Tour will be from 29/08 to 21/09, with two rest days. The start is from Madrid and the last stage will end in Paris, on the Champs Élysées.

This is my tour: maps/tours/view/14151

Stages 1 to 7: Unipublic
Stages 8 to 13 and 21: ASO
Stages 14 to 20: Rcs

21 stages for 3408.66 km
2 ITT stages (34.61 total km)
6 * stages
2 ** stages
4 *** stages
2 **** stages
5 ***** stages
2 Rest days

Sat. 29/08 - Stage 1: Madrid > Madrid 11.07 Km (ITT)
Image
The first stage is a prologue in Madrid, the Spain's capital and the traditional end of the Vuelta. It is not very long but we could have some incredible surprises becuase this would be the first race since a lot and we can't know the conditions of the cyclists.

Sun. 30/08 - Stage 2: Madrid > Ávila 201.68 Km ***
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In the 2nd stage we have an hilly stage with two 2nd category and a 3rd category climbs. Like the previous stage, we could have some incredible surprises in this not so simple stage to interpret. The old town of Ávila, with its ancients walls, is an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Mon. 31/08 - Stage 3: Ávila > Valladolid 189.86 Km *
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The 3rd stage of this Grand Tour of the grand tours is the first chance for the sprinters to collect probably the most important win of their season. The stage finish is in Valladolid, capital of the autonomous community of Castile and León.

Tue. 01/09 - Stage 4: Valladolid > Aguilar de Campoo 187.89 Km *
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Like in the previous day, we have a flat stage for the sprinters with a 4th category GPM not far from the finish line, which is in the little city of Aguilar de Campoo.

Wed. 02/09 - Stage 5: Cistierna > Alto de l'Angliru 137.15 Km *****
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The 5th stage is the first really difficult stage of my Grand Tour, with the finish on the summit of the Alto de l'Angliru, one of the hardest climbs in all the Europe. The fastest ascent time is from 2000, by Roberto Heras, but maybe we could see a new time by Bernal or one of the other top climbers that will be the main characters in this Grand Tour of the Grand Tours.

Thu. 03/09 - Stage 6: Laredo > Donostia-San Sebastián 199.22 Km **
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After a very hard stage with an hard climb at the end, we have an hilly stage that goes from Laredo to San Sebastián, where is held the Clasica de San Sebastian in every August. In this stage cyclist "travel" in the Pais Vasco, one of the most important region for cycling. As already mentioned, this stage is not totally flat but hilly, and there are 4 4th category climbs and a 3rd.

Fri. 04/09 - Stage 7: Pamplona > Jaca 210.77 Km ***
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This is the last stage organised by Unipublic, the organiser of the Vuelta. The start is in Pamplona, the 2nd greatest basque city, and the finish line is in the village of Jaca, 1st capital of the Kingdom of Aragon during the IX and X centuries. We are near the Pyrenees but this is not an high mountain stage. However, we still have 3 3rd category and 3 4th category climbs, and a 2nd category mountain 30 km away from the arrive.

Sat. 05/09 - Stage 8: Jaca > Cauterets 182.60 km ****
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In the 8th stage of this Grand Tour of the Grand Tours we have the first and the easiest high mountian stage of the two which will be raced in Pyrenees. The arrive is in the spa town of Cauterets and there will be the Col d'Aubisque, which was a passage of the Tour de France last time in 2018.

Sun. 06/09 - Stage 9: Lourdes > Col du Tourmalet 202.80 Km *****
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The 9th stage is probably the queen stage of this Grand Tour. The start is from Lourdes, and there are 3 first category climbs, Port de Balés, Col du Peyresourde and Col d'Aspin, before the Col du Tourmalet, the king of the Pyrenees, which has been the finish of a Tour's stage already in the last edition. In this stage we will see who are the riders who can think about winning the Grand Tour and who are not in form enough to do that.

Mon. 07/09 - REST DAY

Tue. 08/09 - Stage 10: Nîmes > Marseille 172.15 Km *
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After the rest day and a transfer from the Pyrenees to the Occitanie, the 10th stage will start from Nimes, one of the most important Roman cities, and finish in Marseille, 2nd largest city in France and another ancient Roman city. This is a flat stage with only a KOM, so it is an occasion for the pure sprinters.

Wed. 09/09 - Stage 11: Toulon > Nice 160.42 km *
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This stage is another occasion for the sprinters to collect a win in this Grand Tour. The start of the day is in Toulon, a city not far from Marseille, and the arrive is in Nice. The only real climb of the day is a 3rd category KOM sprint, the Col du Testanier, and this stage is not really long.

Thu. 10/09 - Stage 12: Nice > Èze 170.48 Km ***
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This is the first of two stages that will have the start line in Nice, because it should have been the Grand Depart of the Tour de France. In this medium mountain stage there are 5 KOM sprints: a 1st category, the Col de la Porte, a 2nd, the Col de Brouis, two 3rd, Aspremont and the arrive, and a 4th. The finish line is in Eze, but riders will have to climb not the classic Col d'Eze but the climb which arrives on the hill where there is the city of Eze.

Fri. 11/09 - Stage 13: Nice > Saint-Martin-Vésubie 149.84 Km ****
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The second stage which starts from Nice is much harder than the previous one and it is the last organised by ASO before the final stage on the Champs-Elysees. The stage is not very long, but in the last 50 km there are 2 1st category climbs, the Col de la Sinne and Valdeblore La Colmiane. The finish line is in the small village of Saint-Martin-Vésubie after a difficult downhill.

Sat. 12/09 - Stage 14: Cuneo > Pian Del Re 165.39 Km *****
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The first stage organised by RCS in Italy is also the first with a climb over 2000 m, the Colle d'Esischie, which has been climbed 2 times during the Giro d'Italia, in 1999 and in 2003. The arrive is in Pian del Re after a 1st category KOM sprint that will probably be a fight between climbers.

Sun. 13/09 - Stage 15: Pinerolo > Pinerolo 23.54 km ITT
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The second and last ITT stage in this Grand Tour of the Grand Tours is in the city of Pinerolo, the arrive of the famous stage Cuneo-Pinerolo in the 1949 Giro d'Italia. This ITT is not very long and there is a climb of 6 km, Colle di Pra Martino.

Mon. 14/09 - Stage 16: Torino > Milano 206.35 Km *
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The 16th stage of this Grand Tour is a flat stage from Torino to Milan, two of the most important italian cities. Milan is also the traditional arrive of the Giro d'Italia. This stage is flat, another occasion for the sprinters to shine.

Tue. 15/09 - REST DAY

Wed. 16/09 - Stage 17: Verona > Montebelluna 174.66 Km **
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After the rest day we have an hilly stage from Verona to Montebelluna, with many hills. This stage is probably a great occasion for riders who will be brave going in breakaway.

Thu. 17/09 - Stage 18: Feltre > Monte Bondone 162.66 Km *****
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We are near the end of this Grand Tour and, on the last week-end, there will be all the final fights between the leaders. The end is on the Monte Bondone, near the capital of Trentino-Alto Adige, Trento. Monte Bondone has been arrive of the Giro d'Italia for 4 times since the 1956. The last time was 2006, with the win of Ivan Basso.

Fri. 18/09 - Stage 19: Trento > Merano 163.67 Km ***
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The end of the 19th stage arrives in Merano, the 3rd greatest city of Trentino Alto-Adige. There are 4 KOM sprints: the hardest are Monte San Pietro and Passo della Mendola, while the latest climb is the Passo della Palade, a 3rd category. The arrive is after a downhill and a little flat section so riders could try to go on a breakaway to win the stage.

Sat. 19/09 - Stage 20: Merano > Alpe Teglio 183.11 km *****
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The last "real" stage of this Grand Tour is from Merano to Alpe Teglio, with two 2nd category KOM sprints, Passo della Palade and Passo del Tonale, a 1st category, Passo del Mortirolo, which is climbed from the second hardest side, and the last hard climb of this Grand Tour, Alpe Teglio, which is an HC climb. After this stage there will be the big transfer from Milan to Paris, for the last stage.

Sun. 20/09 - Stage 21: Sceaux-Antony > Paris - Champs-Elysees 153.35 Km *
Image
After the big transfer from Milan to Paris, we have the last stage which, as the Tour de France's traditions, ends on the Champs-Elysees after 9 laps on the famous circuit.

THANKS FOR THE ATTENTION!!

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antoninvds
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by antoninvds »

Carlo33 wrote:
25/04/2020, 9:27
The second stage which starts from Nice is much harder than the previous one and it is the last organised by ASO before the final stage on the Champs-Elysees. The stage is not very long, but in the last 50 km there are 2 1st category climbs, the Col de la Sinne and Valdeblore La Colmiane. The finish line is in the small village of Saint-Martin-Vésubie after a difficult downhill.
Difficult is not really the word matching with La Colmiane downwill to Vésubie valley ! :happy:

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PaStKaz
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by PaStKaz »

Here is my Grand Tour of The Grand Tours. It's tour of 3 capitals with 1st stage in Roma, decisive ITT in Madrid and grand final in Paris. Another characteristic thing are stage finishes on borders - between Italy and France on stage 7 and France and Spain on stage 13. In general, tour isn't very hard as riding in autumn after half of the year without racing making 3-week race hard enough. Theoretically there is 10 flat stages, but many of them have some hills at the end which should give fans some emotions.

Sprints rules are taken from last Giro - 2 spirint on stage, second of them with bonifications.

Total: 3499 km
2 x ITT (68 km)
10 x flat stage
4 x medium mountain
5 x high mountain

Stages 1 to 7 are organized by RCS, 8 to 13 and 21 by ASO and 14 to 20 by Unipublic.

maps/tours/view/14255
Spoiler!
Stage 01
Lido di Osta - Roma 120,2 km
Start from sea coast, one mountain prime to choose classification leader and then laps in front of thousands of fans followed by great sprint in the middle of antique centre of Roma.
Image

Stage 02
Civita Castellana - Follonica 210,0 km
Hilly stage which should end with bunch sprint anyway. On first part of stage fight for king of the "mountain" jersey is expected.
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Stage 03
San Vincenzo - Carrara 207,0 km
Next day and next difficulty level. Day for punchers and maybe for GC contenders to see if someone isn't is in very bad shape at the beginning of the race (if is in just bad, should still survive).
Image

Stage 04
Parma - Milano 161,4 km
Mario Cipollini will appriciate this stage (maybe with few objections about number of turns on last kilometers).
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Stage 05
Busto Arsizio - Oropa 158,4 km
There is only one week in Italy so there is no more time for easy days. This isn't the hardest, it's quite short but have potential to show who is who in this race.
Image

Stage 06
Biella - Superga 202,6 km
Up and down and up and down and up and... and at the end Superga.
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Stage 07
Torino - Col de Montegenvre 188,9 km
Queen stage of italian part in the last day in this country - but still not the killer who could set up classification for next two weeks. Finish on border with France when show will go on next day.
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Stage 08
Briancon-l'Alpe d'Huez 212,5 km
Briancon and l'Alpe d'Huez - sounds like very classic TdF stage in Alps. Actually it's not because Noyer or Parquetot aren't in regular use on le Grand Boucle but still gives chance for very good race on not so high alitutudes.
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Stage 09
Grenoble - Lyon - Fourviere 167,1 km
It's Sunday, so streets of Lyon should be absolutely full of fans who will enjoy fight on hill for 1st place on stage finish.
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Stage 10
Saint-Chamond - Saint-Etienne 41,9 km ITT
Very competitive time trial. Very important day for GC contenders.
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Stage 11
Valence - Montpellier 206,3 km
When we saw bunch sprint last time? Oh, it was on stage 4. Day for sprinters to show that they are still here.
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Stage 12
Beziers - Saint-Girons 200,3 km
Another flat stage which isn't for sprinters actually. Breakaway specialist will mark this day in roadbook.
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Stage 13
Lannemezan - Col du Pourtalet 175,5 km
Pyrenees classic. Long uphills on classic cols and stage finish on border becouse it's time to say goodbye to France for some time.
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Stage 14
Sabinanigo - Pamplona 178,4 km
It's weekend again so time to visit some big city where route should be full of fans.
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Stage 15
Estella - Arrate 223,8 km
It could be most entertaining day. Small Vuelta la Pais Vasco. Longest stage of whole race, just before rest day and 10 categorized uphills.
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Stage 16
Vittoria - Burgos 148,6 km
After real rest day, unofficial rest day - less than 150 km and easy way to win for sprinters - on last 10 kilometers the hardest points are roundabouts. No turns there.
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Stage 17
Burgos - Sepulveda 192,8 km
Another day which won't be so important for GC - this time breakaway specialist or punchers should show they skills.
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Stage 18
Segovia - Bola del Mundo 161,45 km
Classic mountain stage in this region - we will be 3 times on Puerto de Navacerrada. Bola del Mundo is place when 2,5 weeks of very good ride can be forgetten in few minutes. It's also the highest point of race.
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Stage 19
Guadarrama - Navarredonda de Gredos 215.1 km
You want to make some crazy attack to get back what you lost yesterday? Get your teammates and go with pace which noone could follow? You are on 8th place and feel that you can be 5th and your rivals are blocked becouse of tactical reasons? Here is scene for you.
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Stage 20
Madrid (Estadio Metropolitano) - Madrid 26,2 Km ITT
Small grand finish on Madrid streets - not so many kilometers, maybe fight only for stage, maybe still on highest places in GC.
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Stage 21
Sarcelles - Paris 100,3 km
Big grand finish in Paris. Nothing more to explain.
Image

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Anderson
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Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Anderson »

Hello everyone!
My name is Anderson and this is my submission for the Grand Tour contest.

Some key facts about the route:
21 demanding stages
3.413 km
47.300 vertical meters
5 countries (ITA, FRA, MCO, SUI, ESP)
5 regions in Italy (Emilia-Romagna, Toscana, Liguria, Lombardia, Piemonte)
4 regions in France (Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, Occitaine, Nouvelle-Aquitaine, Île-de-France)
5 regions in Spain (Catalunya, Galicia, Asturia, Cantabria, Pais Vasco / Basque Country)

LINK : maps/tours/view/14297

Stage 1 – Rimini – Palacongressi > Rimini – Ruota Panoramica
RCS – Team Time Trial – 13,2km
The race starts with a Team Time Trial at the Rimini beach at the Adriatic Sea. It is similar to the Vuelta ones, so there will already be small time gaps between the GC favourites.
Image


Stage 2 – Santarcangelo di Romagna > Firenze
RCS – Hilly – 208,8km
A demanding stage from Emilia-Romagna to Toscana. The peloton overcomes the Monte Falco massif and drives through the Chianti region before it reaches Firenze. The peloton passes some iconic Florentine places like Piazzale Michelangelo, Gardegna di Boboli and Piazzale della Uffizia before the stage will be decided in a bunch sprint.
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Stage 3 – Prato > La Spezia
RCS – Medium Mountain – 200,4km
After a flat start the peloton reaches the Tyrrhenian coast. The difficult last 60km will feature the Parco Nazionale delle Cinque Terre with the famous coast villages. The riders have to climb three categorised climbs. After the second pass of Monte Coderone follows a fast descent to La Spezia. A challenging stage which is suited for attacks.
Image


Stage 4 – Chiavari > Bergamo
RCS – Hilly – 216,6km
The race leaves Liguria to the north and reaches Lombardia. Today we remember the Covid-19 pandemic and pass some badly hit towns like Codogno and the stage finish, Bergamo. Most likely the winner today will be a sprinter. They won’t have much opportunities in this Grand Tour!
Image


Stage 5 – Bergamo > Lugano – Breganzona (SUI)
RCS – Hilly – 156,7km
Today’s start will be at ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital at Bergamo as a remembrance to the pandemic and a sign of appreciation. Then the peloton finally reaches the Alps. Lake Como and Lake Lugano will bring beautiful views before the hectic finale. Riders might attack on the descent of Colle di Cimo and try to win the stage on the hill finish at Breganzona. This is the only stage finish outside France, Italy and Spain.
Image


Stage 6 – Varese > Piedicavallo
RCS – Medium Mountain – 174,1km
Varese will host the start of a medium mountain stage which is almost completely on the roads of Piemonte region. Two consecutive Cat.1 climbs (Bielmonte and Colle della Colma) with very different characteristics precede the technically difficult descent from Santuario di Oropa to the beautiful town of Biella. The picturesque village of Piedicavallo lies on the end of the first mountain top finish. Riders who aim for the Mountain jersey can collect valuable points today.
Image


Stage 7 – Ivrea > La Salle-les-Alpes
RCS – High Mountain – 195,7km
After a flat course to Pinerolo, the 60km long climb to Sestriere will cause problems to the riders. At Col de Montgenèvre, the race enters France for the first time. The finish venue will be the same as Tour de France 2017. Attackers will see their chance for a stage victory today. France as finish host but stage organizer is RCS.
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Stage 8 – Briançon > Sant’Anna di Vinadio
ASO – High Mountain – 128,8km
Today will be the queen stage of Week 1! After the first rider on Col du Vars (2110m) collects Cima Coppi and Souvenir Henri Desgrange as it’s the highest point reached in the race, the peloton climbs Col de Larche / Maddalena and enters Italy for a last time. The Province of Cuneo hosts the finish at Sant’Anna di Vinadio on top of the first HC climb. There will be huge time gaps between the GC contenders today! Italy as finish host but stage organizer is ASO.
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Stage 9 – Menton > Nice
ASO – Medium Mountain – 177,7km
Stage 9 starts in Menton at the Cote d’Azur. The peloton passes beautiful seaside places like Monaco, Antibes and Cannes before we go into the inner land away fron the coast. Col d’Aspremont and Col des Quatre Chemins resemble the famous last stage of Paris-Nice. The first week of hard and diverse racing finds its end on the Promenade des Anglais. Strong sprinters and brave attackers will battle out who wins this prestigious stage. The first rest day tomorrow will be spent in the PACA region.
Image


Rest Day 1 – PACA region


Stage 10 – Toulon > Arles
ASO – Plain – 177,0km
To start Week 2, we have a rather simple stage which leads to the Rhône valley. It is very likely that we see a bunch sprint at Avenue Victor Hugo, next to the recently opened LUMA Arles. But the riders need to be careful of crosswinds at the coast and along the plain fields at the end.
Image


Stage 11 – Vauvert > Mont Aigoual
ASO – High Mountain – 140,0km
A rather short stage which is completely in Département Gard. Many riders will drop off the main group on the three climbs of Category 2 and 3 as the second HC climb of the race, Col de la Lusette, finally breaks the peloton apart. It is likely that a strong attacker reaches the summit of Mont Aigoual first, but there will be GC contenders who want to gain some time.
Image


Stage 12 – Lodève > Perpignan
ASO – Plain – 200,7km
The flattest stage this year. From Massif Central, we head south to the mediterranean coast. Although there are many turns in the last 40km, a bunch sprint is the likely outcome. For the Green Jersey candidates, there won’t be many chances left.
Image


Stage 13 – Girona > Barcelona - Montjuic
Unipublic – Hilly – 176,8km
The race finally enters Spanish territory! Today’s start will be Girona, the home of many professional riders. After visiting Costa Brava and Circuit de Catalunya, there will be a hectic finale with many attractions in Barcelona: Parc Güell, Sagrada Familia and the hill sprint at the Olympic Stadium on Alto de Montjuic.
Image


Stage 14 – Cornellà de Llobregat > Manresa
Unipublic – Medium Mountain – 202,8km
A medium mountain stage through the inner land of Catalunya. Four categorised climbs on the menu today, the hardest comes 30km before the finish line where the peloton comes close to famous Monasterio de Montserrat. The stage will be decided on the descent to the beautiful town of Manresa.
Image


Stage 15 – Solsona > Estación de Port Ainé
Unipublic – High Mountain – 181,5km
The queen stage of Week 2! For a third consecutive day, we race in the region of Catalunya. Almost 4700 vertical meters and four categorised climbs are on the menu today as the peloton climbs Coll de Port, Port del Cantó and Alt d’Enviny. As seen in Volta a Catalunya, the finish will be at Estación de Port Ainé, the third HC climb. The foundation is set for an epic fight of the GC favourites!
Image


Rest Day 2 – Transfer to Galicia


Stage 16 – Santiago de Compostela > Viveiro
Unipublic – Hilly – 200,6km
The beautiful city of Santiago de Compostela hosts the start for the third and deciding week of cycling as the peloton goes north to the cliffs and coasts of Costa Ártabra. Only one categorised climb but there are many hills on the menu which make the race harder than it seems. Additionally, take care of the wind and the winding roads!
Image


Stage 17 – Gijón - Playa de Poniente > Oviedo - Plaza de los Ferroviarios
Unipublic – Individual Time Trial – 46,0km
Today we see the only Individual Time Trial in this Grand Tour. It is splitted in two very different segments. From Playa de Poniente at Gijón, the contestants ride uphill to Alto de Ruedes, followed by a long flat section, suited for people like Dumoulin. The key place lies at km 36: Cat.2 climb Alto del Violeo with slopes up to 23% brings everyone out of rhythm, but riders like Bernal, López etc. can reduce their loss here. After a short descent to Oviedo, we will clearly see who is still in position to win the Tour!
Image


Stage 18 – Belmonte de Miranda > Pola de Lena
Unipublic – High Mountain – 127,4km
The Asturian part of the Cantabrian Mountains hosts the next short and dynamic stage. Four Cat.1 mountains, all of them with high gradient percentages, set the scenery for an epic fight between the GC contenders. Additionally, a lot of points fort he mountain jersey are up for grabs today. The riders have to stay concentrated on the bendy descents. A mistake here can cost them valuable time.
Image


Stage 19 – Llanes > La Arboleda
Unipublic – Medium Mountain – 221,7km
We continue our trip along the north Spanish coast as we go further east. After the start in the Asturian coast village Llanes, we pass the Cave of Altamira as well as the cities Torrelavega and Santander. The last 100km feature a total of six categorised climbs in Cantabria, the final one as a mountain top finish at Valle de Trápaga in Basque Country. The attacker’s group will be full of teams which haven’t won a stage yet, today will be their chance to bring the Tour to a good end.
Image


Stage 20 – Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port > Port de Larrau
ASO – High Mountain – 140,0km
The final mountain stage. This stage has the potential to change the whole situation. Two HC climbs (Hourcère and Larrau) as well as two Cat.1 and one Cat2 await the riders. No one can relax on this stage. The GC contenders can lose a lot of time. The Green Jersey holder can fall off the time limit. The Mountain Jersey Holder can lose his jersey. On top of Port de Larrau at the French-Spanish border, we know the winner(s) and the losers of this Grand Tour. Transfer to Paris either via Airport Biarritz or Airport Pau.
Image


Stage 21 – Pontoise > Paris Champs-Élysées
ASO – Plain – 126,4km
As it is tradition, the Tour d’Honneur in Paris. We pass a lot of iconic places like L’Arche de la Défense, Stade Roland Garros, Parc des Princes, Tour Eiffel and Hôtel des Invalides before we go on the circuit at Champs-Élysées.
Image

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Arnorius
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Posts: 55
Joined: 31/05/2018, 10:14

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Arnorius »

So, finally finished it.


maps/tours/view/14500
  • 8 Mountain stages (5 MTF)
  • 7 Sprint stages
  • 1 TTT
  • 2 ITT's
  • 105 km TT (71 ITT, 34 TTT)
Spoiler!
Image
Grand Depart of my tour is in northern Spain with a stage around Santander. This should be a chance for the sprinters but the stage isn't totally flat, so punchers have chances to escape.

Image
The second stage is immediately a hard one. La Vuelta dares to do something like this (Lagos de Covadonga on stage 3 as I remember) so I think there is nothing wrong with making such a hard finish on the second day. And there was asked for the biggest stages in the weekends so... :p

Image
A grand tour is nothing without a good TTT. 30km, flat, around a lake, nice region. Not much to say.

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This short stage through the basque country should be something for punchers. Some steep climbs ans small roads, so you never know someone might loose some time.

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In stage 5 we enter France, with a flat stage towards Bordeaux.

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This stage should be another one for the punchers. One hard climb in it and finish in the village of Bonnes-Eaux, after climbing a small part of the Col d'Aubisque.

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After two stages in France we return to Spain to have a last Spanish bunch sprint in Lleida.

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This mountain stage isn't extremely hard, finish is on top of the ski station of Port de Comte.

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The last Spanish stage takes the riders to Andorra, where some real hard climbs await. Finish is in the small border town of Pas de la Casa, just over the top of Port d'Envalira, the highest climb of this whole tour.

Rest Day in Perpignan

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A 30 km flat ITT through the villages near Perpignan.

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A flat stage in southern France, for sure a sprint, but what with the wind?

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This stage is a little bit harder and more something for very strong sprinters or a day that the breakaway could stay in front. Only one climb but Col d'Eze is shortly before the finish in Monaco.

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Entering Italy with another sprinter stage. A long climb on the way shouldn't be a problem for anyone.

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The first mountain stage in Italy brings us some HC climbs and a downhill finish towards Rovereto

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We stay in the same region to have a mountain stage with less hard climbs on the way, but finish on Alpe di Siusi.

Rest Day in Como

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Another ITT, and a very nice one. Starting in Como, following the lake and then Climbing towards Madonna del Ghisallo?

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The last stage for the GC contenders to give the legs some rest. Shoul be a bunch sprint in Torino.

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The first mountain stage of the last part of this tour. The stage isn't that hard and has no extremely hard climbs, but there are enough chances to do something.

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The last stage in Italy takes the riders to the Valle d'Aosta. After four hard climbs the finish is in Courmayeur, with the same finish as Giro last year. I know it's quite stupid to have the same finish but the other option to finish was La Thuile, but then the finish would be too close to the top of the last climb.

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The last mountain stage is a finish we should see in this year's Tour de France, combined with a bit of last year's last stage that wasn't done. Which means Cormet de Roselend plus finish on Col de la Loze.

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I didn't change this one. I figured out that if they wanted the last stage that much I shouldn't change it (Yep, I didn't like that rule :p)

By the way am I the only one who thinks this one was quite hard to make? So many regions and nice stages in my mind I had to delete :(

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IamCeeKae
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Posts: 15
Joined: 22/01/2018, 11:58

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by IamCeeKae »

maps/tours/view/14606

My submission for Contest #3.

User avatar
Xander66
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Posts: 36
Joined: 03/11/2017, 15:33

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Xander66 »

Here's my entry for this contest: maps/tours/view/14477

In the spoiler you can find a stage-by-stage description, the profiles here are in the style of the organizer of that stage.
Spoiler!
Stage 1: Madrid – Madrid (ITT)

The race starts in Spain, with a classic prologue. It’s not the easiest parcours with some steeper roads, but there shouldn’t be too big differences on this distance.

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Stage 2: Madrid – Salamanca

A flat stage, but in this part of Spain the road is never really flat. We start with some climbs which will give a great battle for the first mountain jersey. The second half of the day is more flat, teams with sprinters can organize themselves here and try to catch the break. Should be a sprint in the end, but a surprise is always possible here.

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Stage 3: Tordesillas – Aguilar de Campoo

Where yesterday was a little unsure if it would end in a sprint, there’s no chance the sprinters will let this slip between their hands. Flat from start to finish.

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Stage 4: Reinosa – Picón Blanco

First mountain stage of the race will be on day 4 already. GC riders will battle it out on the steep climb of Picón Blanco, the first real gaps will be made here.

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Stage 5: Castro Urdiales – Zarautz

This will be the first chance for the breakaway. Sprinters have nothing to do in this stage, and the GC riders will wait till the final climb. A break will fight for the stage, but maybe there will be a fight in the back by some people who lost time the day before?

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Stage 6: Pamplona – Aínsa-Sobrarbe

The sprinters get another chance here. There’s a climb at 40km to go which could cause some chaos in the peloton, but the fast guys should be able to survive this without getting in too much trouble.

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Stage 7: Sort – Llívia

4 big climbs along the way to Llívia, and the final stage in Spain. The last part of the stage is flat, so I expect a small group going to the finish line together. Either this will be some guys who went into the attack or GC guys that stayed together. Don’t see too much fireworks here, most likely this stage will serve as a warm-up for what’s still left to come.

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Stage 8: Llívia – Font-Romeu

This stage will be flirting with the 2000m climbs. Three climbs will cut of the legs, before we get a fight to the finish line in Font-Romeu. If you can’t follow the others today, you’re in big trouble for the GC.

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Stage 9: Ax-les-Thermes – Mazamet

Not the hardest of stages, but there’s room for attacks on the last climb of the day. Probably there will be two fights again: on for the stage, and one behind between the GC guys.

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Rest day


Stage 10: Rodez – Mont Lozère

After the rest day we start off the second week with a hilly stage. After the well known climb of Mende, we get 30km more where it’s constantly uphill. The final climb to Mont Lozère isn’t the hardest climb, but it will do for an exciting final.

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Stage 11: Alès – Orange

The first flat stage in France. The two climbs along the way won’t play any role in deciding the winner of today, but today the wind will play its part?

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Stage 12: Orange – Avignon (ITT)

A couple of short climbs on the road between these two beautiful cities. However, most of the road is flat, so this is a day for the purest of time-trialists.

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Stage 13: Vaison-la-Romaine – Barcelonnette

This stage crosses the French Alps, but we stick to the lower and shorter climbs. It’s another perfect day for the breakaway, but with the last climb at 5km to go, also the GC guys can do their thing.

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Stage 14: Jausiers – Prato Nevoso

After a start in France, the first climb of the day leads us to Italy. Only strong guys will make it into the breakaway here, and sprinters might get into trouble quite fast. After that we get a flat section where everyone can recover a bit before we head to the final. 2 short climbs will kick things off before we get the last climb, Prato Nevoso.

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Stage 15: Cuneo – Alba

Not a classic Sunday stage, but just as exciting. Lots of short and steep climbs, some narrow roads every now and then, so you should stay 100% focussed all day because something could happen at any moment. The last climb is the steepest of the day, averaging almost 10%, before we go descent to the finish line in Alba.

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Rest day


Stage 16: Milano – Verona

Couldn’t be more flat. This will be a sprint, nothing else to say about it.

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Stage 17: Verona – Arco

Not the easiest day to predict what will happen. The last two climbs could cause some trouble in the peloton, and also the breakaway could survive again. A group will sprint it out in Arco, if no one gets away solo on the last hill of the day.

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Stage 18: Brescia – Novara

Another flat stage featuring some sections known from Il Lombardia, but they won’t play a role. This is the last chance for the sprinters, after this it’s all about the GC riders.

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Stage 19: Novara – Pila

The marathon high mountain stage every Grand Tour should have. 220km’s with some really hard climbs. If you need to recover time you can send out your teammates for the perfect plan, or you just wait and go all out on the last climb. But after the Col de Joux and the climb to Plau, you shouldn’t underestimate the final climb.

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Stage 20: Torino – Bardonecchia (Jafferau)

This stage features some of the most famous climbs in Italy. First we get the Finestre, maybe too far from the finish to be decisive, but on the other hand it’s the last chance for climbers so why not go all out? After the Finestre it’s one climb after the other, so only the strongest will make it to the final climb of this tour, Jafferau.

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Stage 21: Bois de Vincennes – Paris-Champs-Élysées (ITT)

A Grand Tour should be exciting till the very last moment, and especially if you need to combine all three of them. That’s why the last will be another time trial. If you were by far the strongest before, this distance shouldn’t be a problem to hold the others off. But if it was a close battle in the mountains, anything can still happen here.

Image

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JAdmeal
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Posts: 19
Joined: 01/04/2018, 22:09

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by JAdmeal »

I present you my Grand Tour for this contest maps/tours/view/14198 .
First of all I want to say that I've tried to equilibrate the possibilities between time trialists and pure climbers by putting a decent amount of every type of terrain. Also, as the calendar is reduced, I've designed some stages similar to classics, with short but steep climbs to provide attacks and awesome persecutions. Stage 1, 2, 5, 7 or 16 are some of them. I've also tried to go through unknown climbs or not very used.

It will consist of:
- 3493 kms
- 6 flat stages
- 7 medium mountain stages
- 6 high mountain stages
- 2 ITT (78 kms)
- 5 top finishes
- 89 KOMs
- 8 HC
- 17 1º
- 24 2º
- 14 3º
- 26 4º

Stage 1: Santiago de Compostela > Cabo Fisterra (148,5 kms) - Unipublic - **
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I decided to start this Grand Tour in Santiago de Compostela because it's a great city and this year they celebrate the Año Jubilar 2020. The peloton will be riding near the coastline all the time so the wind might be important. Also, since the steep Mirador de Ézaro, the roads start to get tighter and more diffidult to control. As a first stage, I find it very interesting and it will be similar to a classic.

Stage 2: Vimianzo > Viveiro (214 kms) - Unipublic - **
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Second stage will be really similar to the first one but it will finish in a downhill. The terrain is more difficult and the roads will get steeper and tighter. Another stage with classic vibes.

Stage 3: Praia das Catedrais > Gijón (178 kms) - Unipublic - *
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First flat stage with a sprint in Gijón the terrain near the coastline will be difficult but a massive sprint is expected in the Asturian city.

Stage 4: Oviedo > Santander. Palacio de la Magdalena (209,5 kms) - Unipublic - *
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Another flat stage but with a different terrain, much harder to control. The sprint will be in front of the Palacio de la Magalena, that means that the last 500m are uphill with a gradient of a 5%. Punchers will also have a chance.

Stage 5: Torrelavega > Barakaldo (152 kms) - Unipublic - ***
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Third medium mountain stage similar to a classic. This time the peloton will ride across the steepest climbs near Bilbao and they will decide the winner. It could be a puncher, a climber or even a breakaway.

Stage 6: Amurrio > Ejea de los Caballeros (228,5 kms) - Unipublic - *
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The flatest and longest stage since will take part between País Vasco and Aragón. Another opportunity for the sprinters.

Stage 7: Jaca > Lourdes (185 kms) - ASO - ***
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We will arrive in France with this amazing stage with steep and tight roads in the final kms. Another classic-type of stage which attacks will be present in order to win the stage or make a time gap.

Stage 8: Bagnères-de-Bigorre > Vielha. Val d'Aran (131,5 kms) - ASO - ****
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First high mountain stage in the Pyrenées. This time the peloton will climb the famous cols of Aspin, Azet, Peyragudes and Portillon to return to Spain searching for the surprisingly unkown climb of Mirador d'Arres (6,4 kms - 9,4%).
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Stage 9: Tremp > Port del Comte (214 kms) - Unipublic - *****
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Second high mountain stage and considerably harder than the one before. With more than 200kms and 6000m of positive denivel the peloton will suffer a lot. Cyclists will go through an unexplored part of the Catalan Pyrenées, discovering climbs like Coll de Pradell (17,4 kms - 6,2%) with steep sections of 21%. Pradell is put perfectly in order to attack and create a gap and a spectacular chasing in the climbs after. The famous ski station Port del Comte will host the finish.
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------- RESTDAY: Perpignan -------

Stage 10: Perpignan > Port-Leucate CRI (56 kms) - ASO - *****
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A pancake-flat and long time trial through the eastern villages of Perpignan will be a key stage of this Grand Tour. Climbers will lose lots of minutes and they will have to be aggresive to regain what they lost. Wind could also be an ingredient to make this stage even more awesome.

Stage 11: Narbonne - Istres (221,5 kms) - ASO - *
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Forth flat stage in this Tour and the only one in the second week. After a high-demanding time trial, the peloton will ride through the coastline again, so wind could be another important fact. A massive sprint in Istres is expected.

Stage 12: Aix-en-Provence > Monaco (217 kms) - ASO - ***
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Another long stage near the coastline, but this time two significant climbs and a lap around the well-known Circuit de Monaco will decide the winner.

Stage 13: Menton > Ormea (152 kms) - RCS - *****
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First high mountain stage in the week and first kms in Italy. The unknown climbs of Colla San Bernardo and Quarzina will emcourage people to attack for the win.
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Stage 14: Loano > Borgo Val di Taro (213,5 kms) - RCS - ****
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Long and hard medium mountain stage with the steep Passo Scasella to decide the winner. Climbers and the breakaway are some potential winners.

Stage 15: La Spezia > Val di Luce (128 kms) - RCS - *****
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Last stage of the second week will be a sort but difficult stage between La Spezia and Val di Luce. Passing through the amazing Passo Lagadello (also known as San Pellegrino in Alpe) and climbing to the ski resort of Val di Luce will determine who is stronger.
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------- RESTDAY: Piacenza -------

Stage 16: Piacenza > Como (231 kms) - RCS - ****
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A stage recreating the Giro di Lombardia layout will honor the victims of the Covid-19 pandemic. This will be another classic-type of stage. The Muro di Sormano will decide today's winner.
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Stage 17: Como > Torino (169 kms) - RCS - *
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Last flat stage until Paris. Another massive sprint is expected in Torino.

Stage 18: Torino > Superga CRI (22 kms) - RCS - ****
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Last time trial of the race will be an uphill one, with two exigent and famous climbs near the big city of Torino. Superga, as shown in the Milano-Torino classic, is harder than you think.
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Stage 19: Rivoli > Col du Granon (134,5 kms) - RCS - *****
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Spectacular stage between Italy and France with the dirt track of Colle delle Finestre plus the myth of Sestrière, Montgenèvre and the surprisingly underestimated Col du Granon. Yes, I've put all the 2000m climbs the same day, why not? This mix of climbs could only provide great battle and even more when climbers have a lot of time to recuperate since the long time trial in Perpignan.
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Stage 20: Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne > La Mure (191,5 kms) - ASO - *****
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Last atempt to win the Grand Tour will be in the French Alpes. This queen stage will go through Col du Glandon, the famous Alpe d'Huez, Col de la Sarenne and then the unexploreds Col du Solude, Col d'Ornon and Col de Parquetout. I seriously don't know why the Tour has never proposed this stage. It's really hard and we could see some long attacks in order to be crowned as champion of this Grand Tour.
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Stage 21: Versailles > Paris. Champs Elysées (91 kms) - ASO - *
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And the traditional stage in the Champs Elysées will close this hard and amazing Tour. A massive sprint is also expected in Paris.

User avatar
Brumdog66
Spettatore
Posts: 9
Joined: 04/04/2020, 14:55

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by Brumdog66 »

maps/tours/view/14324
Hi, this is my tour, it includes:
8 flat stages
5 medium mountain/ hill stages
6 high mountain stages
2 ITTs
5 summit finishes (2 HC, 2 1st Cat, 1 2cnd Cat).
2 rest days, one after stage 9 in Lourdes and one after stage 15 in Aosta.
The only plane transfer is before Paris but there are a couple of longish ones (around 80km) between mountain stages.
All stages are organised by the nation that hosts the finish.

Stages:

Stage 1- Madrid (Valdemoro) > Cuenca
The first stage is a hilly one from Valdemoro (a suburb of Madrid) to the city Cuenca. It includes several relatively easy climbs in the middle of the stage before the final and most difficult climb- the Alto del Castillo- which summits about 10km before the finish. This stage should see a battle between the breakaway, the more durable sprinters such as Sagan and the puncheur types a la Alaphillipe.
Image
Image

Stage 2- Cuenca> Valencia
A flat stage for the pure sprinters.
Image

Stage 3- Valencia> Sagunt
The first time trial of the tour, shortish and completely flat. The route follows the coast from Valencia before turning slightly inland and finishing next to the ancient roman ruins in Sagunt. The climbers should lose significant time here.
Image

Stage 4- Castellon de la Plana> Tortosa
Another stage for the sprinters, pan flat and finishing in the city of Tortosa following a short transfer to the popular tourist resort Castellon de la Plana.
Image

Stage 5- Tortosa> Rat de Penat

The first summit finish, although there is only one climb on the menu this stage should see significant time gaps. The finish is on the brutal Rat de Penat, an climb unused in the vuelta, but with a decent road surface and a car park at the top it is surely only a matter of time before it is included.
Image
Image

Stage 6- Barcelona> Torello
Another medium mountain stage, with very little flat and two first category climbs. The last climb is tough and its proximity to the finish could provoke GC attacks, but the first mountain weekend looming will probably discourage this and make it a stage for the breakaway.
Image
Image

Stage 7- Vic> Figueres
A short transfer to the city of Vic leads to a short and generally flat stage which should be for the sprinters. The three medium difficulty climbs right at the start combined with the length could possibly lead to a strong breakaway getting away.
Image

Stage 8- Figueres> Plateau de Beille
The first french stage, a true mountain test with two genuine HC climbs, first taking the Port de Pailheres before the fearsome Plateau de Beille. The steepest slopes are near the bottom and the next stage is easier, so hopefully the race will blow up near the bottom of the final climb.
Image
Image
Image

Stage 9- Saint-Girons> Col d'Aspin
A short, explosive stage before a rest day. The placement of the Peyresourde, the toughest climb of the day as the antipenultimate climb is meant to encourage attacks from afar, before the unheralded col de lancon is passed on the way to the finish, at the oft-used Col d'Aspin- the only member of the pyrennean beatles not to host a summit finish.
Image
Image
Image
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Stage 10- Saint-Gaudens> Narbonne

Typical pan flat stage after a rest day- long, flat and very little climbing.
Image

Stage 11- Beziers> Ales
A transition stage, this time suited to the more durable sprinters. Sagan won a similar stage in last years tour, but I would expect it to be breakaway fodder placed between two flat stages and once things have settled down in the second week.
Image

Stage 12- Nimes> Draguignan

Another flat stage, although it has a climb about fifteen kilometres from the finish, it shouldnt be hard enough to drop all but the heaviest sprinters.
Image

Stage 13- Frejus> Nice
Very similar to stage 2 of this years tour, which is one of the most promising tour stages in recent years and could (and should) lead to real action- possibly even from the Turini although this could be wishful thinking. Unfortunately in my tour it had to be placed before two very hard stages and is therefore unlikely to see any GC action. Should be another breakaway day with some small GC skirmishes possible on the Quatre Chemins.
Image
Image
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Stage 14- Carros> Pian del Re
The first alpine stage is arguably a uniclimb stage in practice, as the Lombarde is climbed early, and there is a lot of flat between it and the final climb. The Pian del Re was used in two consecutive years in the early nineties before being ignored for the last thirty. This is a shame as it is a very difficult and beautiful climb, with the last 12km averaging around 8.5%.
Image
Image

Stage 15- Turin> Saint-Pierre
This would probably be classed as the queen stage, four Cat 1 cols and 5000m of climbing before a descent into the town of Saint-Pierre in the Aosta valley. Though none of the climbs are brutal, all are hard and the tour could be won or lost here.
Image
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Stage 16- Ivrea> Sestri Levante
Once again, the rest day is followed by a day for the sprinters, who should not be troubled by the days climbing. The stage finishes in the coastal town of Sestri Levante, which had developed from a quiet fishing village into a tourist hotspot.
Image

Stage 17- La Spezia> Abetone
The final summit finish, the road doesnt stay flat at all for the last 150km. The final drag to Abetone is preceded by several tuscan hills and a terrific climb that has never been used in the Giro, although its easier side has been used proving the descent is usable. Passo Pradaccio is an irregular ascent that includes a false flat and a 2km section at over 13% near the top, and should be a springboard for attacks, as this is the last chance for the climbers to gain time before the final time trial.
Image
Image
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Stage 18- Florence> Spoleto
A very flat stage, the last before Paris.
Image

Stage 19- Terni> Rieti
The final time trial is longer and has three sections: a flat first 13km, a middle with two hills, and a final flat last 13km. The middle section should help those who gained time in the mountains limit there losses, but the hills are not difficult and the rouleurs should gain minutes.
Image

Stage 20- Sulmona> Chieti
The final mountain stage contains two big climbs including the mammoth Blockhaus, before a long descent and rolling last 20km, finishing after a steep ramp in Chieti. Unless the GC has been completely settled, there should be fireworks on Blockhaus.
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Stage 21- Mantes-a-Jolie> Paris (Champs-Elysees)
The final parade around Paris, taken from this year's Tour.
Image

Thankyou.

User avatar
M0rcuera94
Spettatore
Posts: 1
Joined: 15/04/2020, 12:43

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by M0rcuera94 »

Hi!

This is my proposal

maps/tours/view/14518

Hope you enjoy it!

User avatar
improb
Spettatore
Posts: 48
Joined: 31/08/2016, 23:19

Re: Contest #3 - Grand Tour of the Grand Tours [Cat. 1]

Post by improb »

Brumdog66 wrote:
25/04/2020, 22:16
maps/tours/view/14324
Hi, this is my tour, it includes:
8 flat stages
5 medium mountain/ hill stages
6 high mountain stages
2 ITTs
5 summit finishes (2 HC, 2 1st Cat, 1 2cnd Cat).
2 rest days, one after stage 9 in Lourdes and one after stage 15 in Aosta.
The only plane transfer is before Paris but there are a couple of longish ones (around 80km) between mountain stages.
All stages are organised by the nation that hosts the finish.

Stages:

Stage 1- Madrid (Valdemoro) > Cuenca
The first stage is a hilly one from Valdemoro (a suburb of Madrid) to the city Cuenca. It includes several relatively easy climbs in the middle of the stage before the final and most difficult climb- the Alto del Castillo- which summits about 10km before the finish. This stage should see a battle between the breakaway, the more durable sprinters such as Sagan and the puncheur types a la Alaphillipe.
Image
Image

Stage 2- Cuenca> Valencia
A flat stage for the pure sprinters.
Image

Stage 3- Valencia> Sagunt
The first time trial of the tour, shortish and completely flat. The route follows the coast from Valencia before turning slightly inland and finishing next to the ancient roman ruins in Sagunt. The climbers should lose significant time here.
Image

Stage 4- Castellon de la Plana> Tortosa
Another stage for the sprinters, pan flat and finishing in the city of Tortosa following a short transfer to the popular tourist resort Castellon de la Plana.
Image

Stage 5- Tortosa> Rat de Penat

The first summit finish, although there is only one climb on the menu this stage should see significant time gaps. The finish is on the brutal Rat de Penat, an climb unused in the vuelta, but with a decent road surface and a car park at the top it is surely only a matter of time before it is included.
Image
Image

Stage 6- Barcelona> Torello
Another medium mountain stage, with very little flat and two first category climbs. The last climb is tough and its proximity to the finish could provoke GC attacks, but the first mountain weekend looming will probably discourage this and make it a stage for the breakaway.
Image
Image

Stage 7- Vic> Figueres
A short transfer to the city of Vic leads to a short and generally flat stage which should be for the sprinters. The three medium difficulty climbs right at the start combined with the length could possibly lead to a strong breakaway getting away.
Image

Stage 8- Figueres> Plateau de Beille
The first french stage, a true mountain test with two genuine HC climbs, first taking the Port de Pailheres before the fearsome Plateau de Beille. The steepest slopes are near the bottom and the next stage is easier, so hopefully the race will blow up near the bottom of the final climb.
Image
Image
Image

Stage 9- Saint-Girons> Col d'Aspin
A short, explosive stage before a rest day. The placement of the Peyresourde, the toughest climb of the day as the antipenultimate climb is meant to encourage attacks from afar, before the unheralded col de lancon is passed on the way to the finish, at the oft-used Col d'Aspin- the only member of the pyrennean beatles not to host a summit finish.
Image
Image
Image
Image

Stage 10- Saint-Gaudens> Narbonne

Typical pan flat stage after a rest day- long, flat and very little climbing.
Image

Stage 11- Beziers> Ales
A transition stage, this time suited to the more durable sprinters. Sagan won a similar stage in last years tour, but I would expect it to be breakaway fodder placed between two flat stages and once things have settled down in the second week.
Image

Stage 12- Nimes> Draguignan

Another flat stage, although it has a climb about fifteen kilometres from the finish, it shouldnt be hard enough to drop all but the heaviest sprinters.
Image

Stage 13- Frejus> Nice
Very similar to stage 2 of this years tour, which is one of the most promising tour stages in recent years and could (and should) lead to real action- possibly even from the Turini although this could be wishful thinking. Unfortunately in my tour it had to be placed before two very hard stages and is therefore unlikely to see any GC action. Should be another breakaway day with some small GC skirmishes possible on the Quatre Chemins.
Image
Image
Image

Stage 14- Carros> Pian del Re
The first alpine stage is arguably a uniclimb stage in practice, as the Lombarde is climbed early, and there is a lot of flat between it and the final climb. The Pian del Re was used in two consecutive years in the early nineties before being ignored for the last thirty. This is a shame as it is a very difficult and beautiful climb, with the last 12km averaging around 8.5%.
Image
Image

Stage 15- Turin> Saint-Pierre
This would probably be classed as the queen stage, four Cat 1 cols and 5000m of climbing before a descent into the town of Saint-Pierre in the Aosta valley. Though none of the climbs are brutal, all are hard and the tour could be won or lost here.
Image
Image
Image

Stage 16- Ivrea> Sestri Levante
Once again, the rest day is followed by a day for the sprinters, who should not be troubled by the days climbing. The stage finishes in the coastal town of Sestri Levante, which had developed from a quiet fishing village into a tourist hotspot.
Image

Stage 17- La Spezia> Abetone
The final summit finish, the road doesnt stay flat at all for the last 150km. The final drag to Abetone is preceded by several tuscan hills and a terrific climb that has never been used in the Giro, although its easier side has been used proving the descent is usable. Passo Pradaccio is an irregular ascent that includes a false flat and a 2km section at over 13% near the top, and should be a springboard for attacks, as this is the last chance for the climbers to gain time before the final time trial.
Image
Image
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Stage 18- Florence> Spoleto
A very flat stage, the last before Paris.
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Stage 19- Terni> Rieti
The final time trial is longer and has three sections: a flat first 13km, a middle with two hills, and a final flat last 13km. The middle section should help those who gained time in the mountains limit there losses, but the hills are not difficult and the rouleurs should gain minutes.
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Stage 20- Sulmona> Chieti
The final mountain stage contains two big climbs including the mammoth Blockhaus, before a long descent and rolling last 20km, finishing after a steep ramp in Chieti. Unless the GC has been completely settled, there should be fireworks on Blockhaus.
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Stage 21- Mantes-a-Jolie> Paris (Champs-Elysees)
The final parade around Paris, taken from this year's Tour.
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Thankyou.
Brilliant! I already know what i'm voting for as first place

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