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Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

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emmea90
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Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by emmea90 » 26/04/2019, 9:47

Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad; Strade Bianche; Milano-Sanremo; Gent-Wevelgem; Ronde Van Vlaanderen; Paris-Roubaix; Amstel Gold Race; Fleche Wallonne; Liege-Bastogne-Liege

Those are the most famous spring classics going back sunday-to-sunday with the exception of Fleche, in mid-week

UCI decided that it's time to change the calendar and move the classics in other countries.

You are asked to re-design those classics in totally different places compared to the one that they are set.

About the Roubaix we know that it's different finding cobble sectors in another part of the world, so you can re-design Roubaix in same zone with different start, finish and core sectors. But if you managed to change it of course it will be well appreciated in the evaluation.

The classics must be kept for the same target of riders that can win the original classics and also the distribution of the iconic route elements must be kept. For example, the Sanremo must be at least 290 Kms long with a climb-like Turchino in the middle and two climbs like Cipressa and Poggio in the end. The new fleche must end on a climb as hard as Mur de Huy and so on.

Deadline for this contest will be on May 23, h 23.59

Good luck
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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by Xander66 » 28/04/2019, 15:31

Do we need to keep a look at transfers between races, and keep some in the same region (like the Ardennes classics)?

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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by emmea90 » 28/04/2019, 20:20

Xander66 wrote:
28/04/2019, 15:31
Do we need to keep a look at transfers between races, and keep some in the same region (like the Ardennes classics)?
Fleche and Liege must be in the same zone. The rest is completely free as there is at least a week between them.
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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by jibvalverde » 28/04/2019, 23:28

If we make a Belgian Paris-Roubaix, will it be considered as a change of zone ? Technically, it's a french race in Belgium...

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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by emmea90 » 29/04/2019, 9:09

jibvalverde wrote:
28/04/2019, 23:28
If we make a Belgian Paris-Roubaix, will it be considered as a change of zone ? Technically, it's a french race in Belgium...
Yes, it's considered a change of zone.
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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by jibvalverde » 03/05/2019, 19:50

Liege and Fleche must be close but can they arrive in the same city ?

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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by emmea90 » 04/05/2019, 17:50

jibvalverde wrote:
03/05/2019, 19:50
Liege and Fleche must be close but can they arrive in the same city ?
No
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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by Arnorius » 06/05/2019, 18:03

Should all the races be in 1 continent or can they be all over the world (for example 3 in usa, 3 in europe, 3 asia)

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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by jibvalverde » 06/05/2019, 21:17

Here is my Spring Classic Renovation Conteste !

maps/tours/view/11605

One Classic in France, one in Belgium, one in Scotland, one in Spain, one in Germany and three in England.

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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by Xander66 » 10/05/2019, 11:38

We can only have one entry, right? (I can't find the topic about this year's rules at the moment, just want to be sure)

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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by emmea90 » 10/05/2019, 21:51

Xander66 wrote:
10/05/2019, 11:38
We can only have one entry, right? (I can't find the topic about this year's rules at the moment, just want to be sure)
yes
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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by chuimiento » 16/05/2019, 11:59

Here is my proposal for the Spring Classic Renovation.

maps/tours/view/11684

All the races will be held in Europe. But the new organisations have decided to split more the geographical locations of this races. Because of that, new countries will host important classics, as Ireland with the new Amstel Cork Race. Also, other countries which doesn't have a lot of first-level classics will host some of the most relevant ones. For example, Spain will host new Strade Bianche and Milano-Sanremo. Also, Germany will feature the new Ardennes week-end, with the Flèche in Stuttgart and the Liège at the Sarre state. Other places with important classics are United Kingdom (with the new RVV) and The Netherlands (with the new Roubaix). Also, France and Italy keep themselves one classic each.

Down below there are the descriptions and profiles of each race.
Spoiler!

01 - Omloop Het Paris

The new Omloop Het Nieuwsblad is featured through the surroundings of Paris. This new edition is more focused in cotes than in cobble sectors, although they have more protagonism in the first stage of the race, including a difficult and long ++++ sector at km 46. Thus won't be decisive for the overcome of the race, but could make a role in the formation of a breakaway. The sequence of cotes will make the race hard to control. The three final ascensions, including the cobbled Avenue du Château, will be decisive for the final of the race. Cold will make things harder for the peloton.

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02 - Carreteres blanques

The movement of Strade Bianche to the province of Girona offers an interesting route, crossing mounts and forests on the mythical white roads, with another historical city as Girona -by the way, place where a lot of proffesional cyclists do live- hosting the start and finish of the race. The first 70 km are mostly flat, but with four short dirty segments, which will probably move the race in the search for a breakaway. After them, the main part of the race starts. The most difficult stage of the journey comes just after this, the feared Hortsavinyà, almost 20 km of white roads featuring also a respectable climb, longer than 10 km and with full kilometres above 10%. After it, other climbs in dirt tracks will be featured, as the Puig Ventós, whose summit is placed around 50 km to the finish line. Anyway, the decisive point for the race will probably be the Montnegre climb (8,1 km at 3%), whose first 5 km are placed in a dirt track. Finally, the arrival to Girona receive the riders with two surprises: two short but very steep (7,44% and 8,32% average) climbs, which will decide the race eventually.

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03 - Sevilla - Rincón de la Victoria

The new Milano-Sanremo has been transferred to Andalusia, in southern Spain. The route will start from Seville, just in front of monumental Plaza de España, and will cover a path of almost 300 km until the finish line in the coast of Malaga, at the municipality of Rincón de la Victoria, near the capital city. The first 90 km of the route are mostly flat, crossing the Guadalquivir river valley, leaving the metropolitan area of Seville and passing through vast agricultural fields. Then, the route goes into the Betic mountains, featuring an abrupt relief with constant ups and downs. The riders will leave behind them beautiful white towns, embedded into the hillsides of the mountains. The pass through Ronda (km 129) will be another reelvant point, with the amazing New Bridge. After this, the highest point of the race will be reached, at the Puerto del Madroño (1150 m) which will be followed by a long and fast descent to the coast.

Then, the third half of the race starts around km 175. The route will follow the Costa del Sol, around luxury neighbourhoods and turistical cities. At 70 km to the finish line the main difference between original Sanremo and the new race will start. The riders will apart themselves from the coast to face the ascension to Mijas, gorgeous town. The climb is more than 5 km long at an average above 7%, but it has kilometres above 8,6% and slopes over 13%. A very hard climb, placed far enough from the finish line to not be decisive, but which could increase the fatigue of riders towards the final kilometres.

After the descent the route will approach the city of Malaga, where the final stage of the race starts. In the last 40 km there are 4 climbs: they are not very long or steep, but the length and fatugue will sure make things hard. The first three of them are in the outskirts of Malaga, and clearly the most important of them is the last one: 2 kilometres at 7,6% average, with slopes up to 8,4%. Finally, the last climb to Benagalbon is smooth, but long enough to host some attacks. The sprinters will probably overcome this last climb without big problems, so the main difficulty for them is to hang on the peloton until this climb.

Image

04 - Gent - Wevelgem in Torino

The new Gent-Wevelgem is placed in Piamonte (Northern Italy). The route is placed mainly in the flat valley of Po river, but the foothills of the Alps will be the scenario of the short cotes which makes the Belgian classic itself.

The first 90 km are flat and without any difficulties., and until kilometre 120 the only difficulty is the San Maurizio climb, a short steep cobbled murito at the streets of Pinerolo. After it, an area of short cotes is followed, with 5 short climbs. This is a good point for some outsiders or teams to try to break the race or make some kind of breakaway.

In km 160 the final circuit starts: two climbs (Avigliana and Buttigliera Alta), really smooth and very short, but heavily cobbled. The curcuit will be completed two times, with a space in the middle when the peloton will detour to Rivoli, crossing some cobbled streets in the center of the town. The final two climbs are placed 35 and 20 km to the finish line, allowing the chasers to make it to the sprint in the last flat kilometres towards center Torino.

Image

05 - Ronde van England

The new Monument of short, steep climbs and cobbles will be new in England!

Starting from Manchester, incredibly steep climbs are waiting for the riders in a route whose constant ups and downs are not going to dissapoint. Most of them feature also fragments heavily cobbled, making a route hard to forget.

Some of the principal climbs of the race:
- System Thwaites Brown - Hainworth: three linked climbs, about 1 km each and with average slopes from 8% to almost 10%. Also, two of them are cobbled. This point is placed 100 km before the end of the race.
- System Mt. Skip Hebden Bridge - Halifax Lane - Mount Tabor. Placed between 60 and 35 km to go, probably the hardest moment of the race. The four of them are above 8% average, with cobbles in two of them and maximum slopes until 13,5%.
- System Ploughcroft Lane - Trooper Lane: their summits are placed 20 and 15 km to the finish line and they are both Kappelmuurs on steroids. 1 km but 12% average slopes both. Also, maximum slopes of 16%.

Image

06 - Dutch Roubaix

Dutch cobbles are not as hard as French ones. However, this route present longer cobble sectors -some of them up to 13 or almost 15 km) and the accumulated length of cobble surface is much larger: 66,27 km of cobbles. The relief is also clearly more flat than original Roubaix, and wind could be significantly more relevant. A new Roubaix, where teams and all-rounders are going to play a role to find the new champion.

Image

07 - Amstel Cork Race

This new Amstel is placed in the surroundings of the irish city of Cork. Narrow roads, short but steep climbs and a nervous environment will keep the main interest of the former Dutch race. The most important stage of the race starts at 40 km for the finish line, where the feared Templehill will break the race for the last kilometres. The last ascension, to Burke's Hill, situated just 5 km before the end, could be significant to reveal the name of the winner.

Image

08 - Flèche de Stuttgart

The Flèche Vallone will be moved to Germany. Specially, the city of Stuttgart will be the main character of the new race, which keeps the length and main difficulties. The hills near that surrounds the german city are really steep, and the two final ascensions of Sillenbuch and, specially, the summit ending at Weinsteige will make a perrfect race for puncheurs.

Image

09 - Trier - Saarbrücken - Trier

The new Liège is placed in south-western Germany, featuring principally the Sarre region. The city hosting the start and finish is Trier, near to the border with Luxembourg and even with France. The route goes fastly to Saarbrücken, one of the main cities of the Sarre german state, and then goes back, this time climbing some really steep hills. The last 100 km show the hardest hills, starting from Merchinger Berg (2 km & 8%) and with a whole of 8 climbs, in which the most difficult are Kommlingen (1,3 km & 12,52%), at 20 km to the end, and, finally, Markusber (1,67 km & 10,3%), whose summit is reached only 4 km before the finish line.

Image

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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by Ikhoudvanfrikandellen » 16/05/2019, 19:26

Here's my Spring Classics Renovation: maps/tours/view/11698. Presentation of the nine races below:
Spoiler!
Yorkshire Post Circuit
Image
Omloop het Nieuwsblad moves to Yorkshire, sponsored by the local newspaper. The race is a bit more hilly than it's counterpart, but the brutal climbs in the area are spared. The race starts in Sheffield. The first climbs and cobble sections come around the 80 kilometer mark, with four in rapid succession. Then the race goes to Halifax, which will be the main area of the Tour of Yorkshire cobble race. For now, only Gainest Hill is climb. After a wide road alongside the Calder River, the riders will face a steep cobble climb to Heptonstall, followed by a undulating section through Yorkshire's finest landscape. After a brief excursion to Lancashire the riders return to Keighley, where Hainworth Lane, Haworth's Main Street and finally Thwaites Brow have to be climbed. Finish lies in Bradford after a 15k flat section.

Les Chemins de Terre
Image
Strade Bianche moves to Southern France, in the Hérault department west of Montpellier. Les Chemins de Terre is a literal translation of Strade Bianche. The dirt roads might not be as iconic but there certainly are a lot. Notable sections are the 8.5 kilometer Valmalle à Cournonterral; La Gardiole which coincides with the climb of Pioch Noir; Combes de Cayla immediately followed by Veyrac for a section of over 10k; and the two final sections Preignes à La Baume and Saint-Thomas. Finish is in Béziers, with a steep climb at the end.

Almería - Málaga
Image
Milano - Sanremo moves to Andalucia, Spain to become Almería - Málaga. The race is similar in length, but is almost completely alongside the coast. To create a Tuchino-like climb the riders briefly move land inwards to gain a bit of altitude. The trio of climbs in the end (Benagalbón, Urbanización Parque Victoria and Cerrado de Calderón) are maybe a bit tougher than Cipressa and Poggio, therefore these climbs are not climbed from the most difficult ascent but rather from a slightly longer but less steep one. The finish follows shortly after the Cerrado de Calderón at the Paseo del Parque in Málaga.

Middlesbrough - Gateshead
Image
Gent - Wevelem moves to Northern England, going from Middlesbrough to Gateshead. There are two main laps in the circuit: one around Durham including the South Street cobble section, and one around Newcaslte with Hanover Lane and Condercum Road. The climbs are a lot less steep than the other two cobble races a bit further south in Yorkshire, hence the sprinters are able to win this one.

Tour of Yorkshire
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Ronde van Vlaanderen moves to Yorkshire to become Tour of Yorkshire, not to be confused with the actual stage race. The race starts in York, and after 100 kilometers the riders reach Halifax. This is where climb after climb after cobble section are served. In the first lap the riders get a taste of the arrival zone, with Wakefield Gate, Whitegate Hill and Exley Bank before the flat road towards Huddersfield. Then the second lap contains the most difficult climbs in the area, Lee Lane and Trooper Lane, which are too tough to give an important role, otherwise it would become a puncheurs race. But now they kinda serve like Muur van Geraardsbergen, this is where the race starts. The third 'lap' consists of climbs like Gibb Lane and Old Lane, before heading back to Halifax to go over Wakefield Gate, Whitegate Hill and Exley Bank again to finish in Huddersfield.

Gent - Wilrijk
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Paris - Roubaix moves to Belgium, because what would be a cycling calendar without a Belgian race? This race goes from Gent to Wilrijk, a suburb of Antwerpen. While the cobble sections aren't as tough (only one five-star section), there are 26 of them to tackle. The first two four-star section comes after 60 kilometers in our brief excursion to The Netherlands, with the combination of Timmermansweg and Smokkelweg followed by Bolderweg. After taking a few cobble sections around Lokeren and Sint-Niklaas we move to the other side of the Schelde, where the next four-star section awaits: Nattenhaasdonk. From there it's over to Lier via Hoog-Lachenen, another four-star section. The only five star section comes at 200 kilometers: Pulderbos. Then the riders take Broekstraat, known from the Scheldeprijs, and Boomgardstraat. When we reach Antwerp City, the cobbles aren't done. The Waalsekaai, D'herbouvillekaai/Olieweg and Volhardingstraat are within the final 10 kilometers. Finish at the Wielercentrum Antwerpen vélodrome in Wilrijk.

Bofferding Silver Race
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Amstel Gold Race moves to Luxembourg and is sponsored by Brasserie Nationale du Luxembourg with its brand Bofferding. Since it's a baby version of Amstel Gold Race, it is called the Silver Race. The race starts in Luxembourg City, heading towards the German border and the Rhine flanks, with three climbs early in the race. After heading from Schengen to Esch-sur-Alzette, a brief excursion to France and Differdange, the race goes back towards the capital. The climb towards the Kirchberg district is the stand-in for the Cauberg, with the small but steep and narrow climbs surronding it making an interesting route. There's rarely a flat moment, and while there is no real climb in the final ten kilometers it is almost constantly uphill. Finish lies in front of the École Européene.

La Freccia Adriatico
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La Flèche Wallone moves to Italy to become La Freccia Adriatico. The race starts in Ascoli Piceno and moves towards the Adriatic Sea, where a few small climbs are included. The main attraction is the criterium around arrival city Chieti, containing the climb to San Salvatore, Via Filippo Masci and the Mura di Chieti, which is very similar the the Mur de Huy in terms of length and steepness.

Ancona - Macerata - Ancona
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Liège - Bastogne - Liège becomes Ancona - Macerata - Ancona, slightly north of where the La Freccia Adriatico took place. The race goes, unsurprisingly, from Ancona to Macerata and back to Ancona. The first 70 kilometers from Ancona are constant uphill at a slight angle. The first real climbs follows at 100 kilometers, but then it's up and down. The riders reach Macerata at 125 kilometers. From there it's back towards Ancona, with one of the final climbs being the Poggio di Ancona, not to be confused with the climb with the same name near San Remo. The finish is downhill in line with the recent change to the finish of Liège.

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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by Arnorius » 16/05/2019, 21:08

maps/tours/view/11674

I will try to present it asap, don't know if i have the time today

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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by Arnorius » 17/05/2019, 20:15

Arnorius wrote:
16/05/2019, 21:08
maps/tours/view/11674

I will try to present it asap, don't know if i have the time today
Maybe a bit too late but here's the presentation:


1) Omloop
I Chose to create this race in the same region and on the same hills als my Tour of Yorkshire, just to keep it more real
Image

2) Kielder Gravel classic
For my strade bianchi I chose for the roads of the Dirty Reiver Granfondo, in and around the forest of Kielder, on the border of England and Scotland.
Image

3) Murcia - Calp
For the longest race of the season I stayed at the Mediterranean Sea, but to have the race in Spain. An easy route along the coastline with some smaller climbs. In the end some hills that are not too steep. And to finish it off, the last roundabout has a big fountain. :p
Image

4) Groningen - Assen
For Gent-Wevelgem I thought it would be nice to keep it a windy race for strong sprinters, as we have seen the last years that are the guys who win. So i think this is a nice region with chances for echelons and some cobbled sections. No hills but i think that's not needed.
Image

5) Tour of Yourkshire
This race really needs a type of hills that are hard to find. This was the only region I found that had multiple of these cobbled hills in a small area.
Image

6) Namur - Quénast
Also hard to find a region that has cobbles which are hard enough. I think there are some pretty hard sections here which are roubaix-worthy. For the finish I found a velodrome :)
Image

7) Rimini Gold Race
Small roads, a lot of turns, just like the real gold race.
Image

8) La Fleche d'Auvergne
This is the best Mur that I knew of in the region, only the climb before it is a little bit long, but not extremely steep. Should be just a sprint on the mur.
Image

9) Clermont-Ferrand - Montluçon - Clermont-Ferrand
I didn't want to stay too close to the Belgian Ardennes, so I decided to take on some hills in this region.
Image

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Re: Contest #2 - Sping Classic Renovation

Post by emmea90 » 17/05/2019, 20:59

I'll give you a week more for the contest as currently I've not time to open a new one.
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