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Contest #6: Tour de France

Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

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Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by emmea90 »

Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

And here we are with the yearly contest about Tour de France.

You have to re-draw and improve 2021 Tour de France

Constraints
- Gran Depart should be kept in Bretagne. So Stages 1, 2 and 3 should start and finish in Bretagne, Stage 4 shall start there.
- Of course you have to end TDF in Champs-Elysees. This means that stage 20-21 transfer shall be 'realistic'
- You cannot repeat key parts of Tour de France 2020 real stages
- You have to put a stage start or a stage finish in at least 7 different france regions
- Alps before Pyrenees is a constraint this year.
- Also inserting Mont Ventoux from Bedoin in the route is a constraint.
- Again, like 2020, you are not allowed to leave France for the whole route. All the Kms of Tour de France shall be in France. The only ones exception admitted will be Monaco and Andorre.
- You must have from 5 to 7 stages for pure sprinters, Paris included - and no more than 2 of them consequently
- There should be at least 2 high mountain stages that does NOT end in a MTF

Deadline will be Saturday 24/7/2020, h 23.59

Tour must be done using Tour de France - 2019 profiles, with Large X-Size and normal slopes on to have an easy comparison between different routes.

Please put ALL the routes under spoiler tag in this topic

People using correctly spoiler tags will get +1 bonus to be added to the presentation bonus.
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Fyr3
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by Fyr3 »

Fyr3's Tour de France 2021

Link to LFR route (beware stage errors because of GPX stuff on stage 12 / 13) - maps/tours/view/18900

Route Map
Image

Route Summary
Hello all today I present my route summary for my Tour de France 2021. Starting in Bretagne with individual stages in Finistère, Côtes-d'Armor and Morbihan, the winding roads, windy coastlines and sharp rises of the region will characterise this Grand Départ. The opening stage from Brest to Châteaulin suits the skill-set of many riders in the peloton, while the second stage up the famous Mûr-de-Bretagne will truly open the GC battle, with a third stage finishing on the Quiberon Peninsula where the wind can blow strongly. On stage 4 we say our final goodbye to Bretagne, departing from La Roche-Bernard.

Stage 4 heads into the department of Loire-Atlantique, for a stage that follows the coastline before heading up the famous Loire to finish in the city of Nantes, another day where the favourites must be wary of the wind. Vendée once again hosts a stage in the Tour after the Grand Départ in 2018, with an individual time trial of 40km from Saint-Gilles-Croix-de-Vie to the famous Passage du Gois, which hosted the start of the 2011 Tour 10 years ago. After a transfer, the peloton will tackle a long stage between Angers and Tours, with the Tour de France taking for the first time ever to the gravel roads that characterise Paris-Tours, inciting potential chaos of the likes we haven't seen since John Degenkolb won in Roubaix. The race then heads to Châteauroux for a sprint finish on stage 7, before stage 8 hosts a finish at the famous Circuit de Charade, that has hosted the French Grand Prix 4 times. The first week finally ends with a summit finish on the Croix de Chaubouret.

After the first rest day in Isère, a lumpy stage between L'Isle-d'Abeau and Romans-sur-Isère could be one for many riders, before the Alps begin with back-to-back summit finishes at La Toussuire and Risoul. Another hard day on stage 13 will see the peloton pass through the Gorges du Verdon for a probable breakway success in Aix-en-Provence, followed by a spectacle double ascent of Mont Ventoux on stage 14, and a rolling day with a threat of crosswinds into Nîmes ahead of the rest day.

The riders will stay in Nîmes for the rest day, before returning to action in a flat stage to Carcassonne, and tackling a succession of 3 Pyrenean stages. First the Port de Lers and Col de la Core should interest the escapees, with a potential for long range attacks to the finish line in Saint-Girons. Then a short stage with a deadly sequence of the Port de Balès and the climb to Superbagnères. Finally, a compact but ultimately decisive mountain stage starting out in Saint-Gaudens and crossing the Aspin and Tourmalet passes for a finish at Luz Ardiden, which last saw Thomas Voeckler's defence of yellow in 2011. After this dreadful third week, a final opportunity for the sprinters in a transition stage to Libourne, before a final stage that will go down in history as only the second time the Tour de France has ended with an Individual time trial on the Champs-Élysées in front of the Arc de Triomphe.

Statistics
-21 stages with a total of 3458km raced, and an average distance on road stages of 178.5km.
-2 Individual Time Trials with a total of 66km.
-7 Flat stages.
-5 Hilly or Medium Mountain stages.
-7 High Mountain stages with 5 summit finishes.
-8 regions crossed, with a total of 33 departments visited.
-31 mountain passes (category 2 to HC) with a total of 73 classified climbs.
-A shortest road stage of 128km (stage 19)
-A longest road stage of 220km (stage 16)
-6 Bonus points across the race (Mûr-de-Bretagne, Col de la Baraque, Col d'Izoard, Mont Ventoux, Port de Balès, Col du Tourmalet)
-The longest transfer is 156km between the Passage du Gois and Angers, which would take a comparatively similar time to the transfer between Le Creusot and Oyonnax in the real Tour (~ 2 hours.)
-Most of the route's transfers aside from the one to Paris are less than an hour long, with many far less as the town hosts both a start and finish.
-The highest point on the route, designated Souvenir Henri Desgrange, will be the 2642m Col du Galibier from Valloire. The climb is one of 4 on the route above 2000m in altitude.
-The toughest summit finishes on this year's route will be the final climbs to Superbagnères and Luz Ardiden on stages 18 and 19, while the hardest pass on the entire route is the Mont Ventoux on stage 14.
-In 1989, the only other year the race finished with the Champs-Élysées time trial, the winning margin in the overall was just 8 seconds.
-Doubled KOM points on climbs above 2000m (Croix-de-Fer, Col du Galibier, Col d'Izoard and Col du Tourmalet.)
-Stage 5 features the lowest elevation gain of 154, while the highest is recorded on stage 11 (4702m)
-In total according to Open Runner the combined elevation gain of the 21 stages is 54465m!

Route Presentation
Spoiler!

Stage 1 - Brest > Châteaulin - Hilly - 194km

Image

Image

Stage 1 from Brest to Châteaulin should see a large group of riders interested in taking the first yellow jersey. Solo artists will no doubt try to use the short climbs in the final kilometres to try and escape, while sprinters who can climb like Colbrelli will try to hang on over the toughest climbs to win on the short false flat sprint up to the line in Châteaulin. There should also be quite a battle for the first KOM jersey, with no less than 14 points available throughout the stage. Châteaulin is perhaps best known as the host of the Boucles de l'Aulne, and has seen the Tour pass through it several times, including a passage during 2018, and a time trial in the past also.

Elevation gain: 3002m

Stage 2 - Perros-Guirec > Mûr-de-Bretagne Guerlédan - Hilly - 149km

Image

Image

With the first yellow jersey handed out, it will be difficult to cling on to it in this short but irregular stage between the seaside resort of Perros-Guirec and the famous final climb up the Mûr. Riders such as Alexis Vuillermoz and Dan Martin have been victorious here in the past. With bonus seconds to also be handed out on the first passage of the climb, the GC battle could be very tight, and we could already see some big loosers in the peloton after the opening weekend.

Elevation gain: 1934m

Stage 3 - Lorient > Quiberon - Flat - 217.5km

Image

Image

Quiberon and its peninsula welcomes the Tour de France for the first sprint stage. The opening half of the stage is lumpy, and with two categorised climbs will see yet more fighting over the Polka-dot Jersey, but the second half of the stage is where most of the action is likely to occur. After Vannes and the intermediate sprint, the roads are largely wide and open with little shelter from the wind coming off the often stormy Atlantic Coast. Should the wind blow strongly, we could see the peloton splinter in the 50km or so of roads around and on the peninsula before we get to the finish line.

Elevation gain: 2058m

Stage 4 - La Roche-Bernard > Nantes - Flat - 161km

Image

The peloton gets underway once a gain for a stage fraught with danger posed by the wind. The riders will also pass over the famous Pont-de-Saint-Nazaire, before a likely sprint finish in the city of Nantes.

Elevation gain: 984m

Stage 5 - Saint-Gilles-Croix-de-Vie > Le Passage du Gois - Individual time trial - 41.5km

Image

The famous submersible road of the Passage du Gois will be visited once again after the Tour departed from here in 2011. The riders will not have to cross the submersible part of the road itself due to the issue with tides and schedules for the race, however, the 42km route between saint-Gilles-Croix-de-Vie - a commune nearby the famous resort of Saint-Hilaire-de-Riez - and the finish line should shake up the general classification and be the basis for the next 3 weeks of racing.

Elevation gain: 154m

Stage 6 - Angers > Tours - Hilly - 207km

Image

Stage 6 of this year's route sees a big hurdle for the riders targeting the overall standings in Paris. Despite the 150km flat introduction to the route, the final 50km will take place on short hills and narrow gravel sectors commonly seen in the autumn classic Paris-Tours. Riders on a bad day or caught out of position, and even those suffering with punctures and so forth on such a day, can quickly find themselves loosing time to rivals. The nature of the route lends itself to riders comfortable on unpaved roads and who can climb, notably the likes of Søren Kragh Andersen, a former Paris-Tours winner, and punchers who can ride on days like these such as Benoît Cosnefroy. Expect the yellow jersey to potentially change today.

Elevation gain: 937m

Stage 7 - Tours > Châteauroux - Flat - 160.5km

Image

The roads of stage 7 offer a final chance for the pure sprinters to take victory before the first rest day. Mark Cavendish is a favorite to win on the roads of the town that took him to victory back in 2008.

Elevation gain: 1143m

Stage 8 - Montluçon > Circuit de Charade - Medium mountain - 147.5km

Image

Image

Image

The spectacle of the riders battling it out on one of the most beautiful circuits in the world, the Circuit de Charade, will be no doubt entertaining, whether or not the GC men decide to get involved. Situated on an extinct Volcano, the chicanes and fast bends of the track should decide victory if a rider has not yet dropped his opponents on the 2 final climbs. For GC riders, its an opportunity to potentially gain a few seconds.

Elevation gain: 2489m

Stage 9 - Vichy > Croix de Chaubouret - High mountain - 198km

Image

Image

Image

Before the first rest day of the race, riders will no doubt be ready to give it everything they have left after a draining first week to hang on over the final climb of the Croix de Chaubouret. 10km long at 6.7%, it is by no means the toughest of the race. However, after this first week of racing, it will no doubt take its toll on riders over the coming days, and potentially play a role in deciding the overall standings in Paris.

Elevation gain: 3088m

Rest day in Isère

Stage 10 - L'Isle-d'Abeau > Romans-sur-Isère - Flat - 158km

Image

After the first rest day of this Tour de France, the roads of the Isère and Drôme departments will host a stage that has no clear favourite. A breakaway success? A solo attack in the final kilometres? A mass sprint? A reduced sprint? Whatever the case, whoever takes the spoils in Romans is certainly an accomplished rider.

Elevation gain: 1873m

Stage 11 - Domène > La Toussuire - High mountain - 174km

Image

Image

Image

Image

Second mountain stage of the Tour, and a second summit finish but this time far more selective. The sequence of Croix-de-Fer > Col du Mollard > La Toussuire offers up plenty of opportunity for attacks, while those in the break will be happy as there are several KOM points to pick up points on during the stage.

Elevation gain: 4702m

Stage 12 - Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne > Risoul 1850 - High mountain - 149km

Image

Image

Image

Image

Stage 12 features the second consecutive summit finish of the Alps, on what is arguably one of the toughest stages in the race. Featuring the Télégraphe, Galibier and Izoard mountain passes, before a finish at the resort of Risoul, today's winner is no doubt an excellent climber. With 2 first category and 2 HC ascents, there will also be plenty of KOM points on offer given the double points above 2000m.

Elevation gain: 4549m

Stage 13 - Digne-les-Bains > Aix-en-Provence - Hilly - 212km

Image

As most viewers return from a last day at work and sit down to watch the Tour, they will be greeted with the spectacle of the beautiful Gorges du Verdon through which the race shall pass. Several climbs on the menu, not least 3 category 2 passes, means the stage will most likely go to a breakaway rider, although watch out for guys like Colbrelli and Matthews to try and make the moves to secure Green Jersey points.

Elevation gain: 3216m

Stage 14 - Sorgues > Malaucène - High mountain - 199km

Image

Image

The double ascent of the Ventoux is to be feared, the stage potentially a contender for the title of "Queen stage." Riders will have to attack far out from the summit of the second ascent, so as to have enough of a gap on the fast descent to hold off any chasing groups.

Elevation gain: 4605m

Stage 15 - Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux > Nîmes - Flat - 159km

Image

The final stage before the rest day will see riders vying for victory in the city of Nîmes. After a passage through the spectacular Gorges de l'Ardèche, riders will need to be weary of the wind blowing at the start line and after Uzès.

Elevation gain: 1923m

Rest day in Nîmes

Stage 16 - Nîmes > Carcassonne - Flat - 219.5km

Image

The narrow technical roads common in the departments of Aude and Hérault will define the day after the rest day, with sprinters teams having to control the race from early on to be in with a chance of victory in the historic town of Carcassonne.

Elevation gain: 2260m

Stage 17 - Carcassonne > Saint-Girons - High mountain - 218.5km

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The finale into Saint-Girons has breakaway written all over it. The first of the stages in the Pyrenees lends itself to a large break going up the road, with mountain points scattered across the route. The climbs of the Port de Lers and Col de la Core should prove decisive in the fight for a stage win, and could even shape a little action in the GC group behind as there is just 30km of mostly downhill after the final ascent to play with. The french will be extremly motivated for this day, as it is the 14th of July, Bastille day, a day upon which Warren Barguil the Breton rider won back in 2017.

Elevation gain: 3935m

Stage 18 - Saint-Girons > Superbagnères - High mountain - 129.5km

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First of two successive summit finishes in the final mountain range, the resort of Superbagnères hosts a stage above the town of Luchon. The sequence of the Port de Balès when combined with the final climb makes for a deadly combo. Roadworks are currently underway to restore a bridge on the ascent that would allow the passage of some race vehicles, however if a scenario occurs where the ski resort cannot host the stage because of delays, then the finish will be adjudged at the bottom of the penultimate climb in Luchon.

Elevation gain: 3988m

Stage 19 - Saint-Gaudens > Luz Ardiden - High mountain - 127.5km

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Final mountain stage of this Tour, and Luz Ardiden makes its return after the heroic defenses of Thomas Voeckler back in 2011. The sequence of the Aspin and Tourmalet passes before it will make it both a key stage in the fight for the KOM jersey, and a final opportunity for the climbers to gain time in GC before the final time trial.

Elevation gain: 3681m

Stage 20 - Mourenx > Libourne - Flat stage - 207km

Image

The final opportunity for the sprinters to pick up points in the Green jersey presents itself on stage 20. After that, there will be no usual parade and easy run in to Paris to celebrate.

Elevation gain: 1693m

Stage 21 - Versailles > Paris Champs-Élysées - Individual time trial - 24.5km

Image

Following a similar route to that of the final time trial of 1989, for only the second time in the Tour's history the race will culminate with a time trial on the Champs-Élysées in Paris. Passing through the Louvre and the Place de la Concorde, the race will be decided in front of the Arc de Triomphe, and great emotions will be felt around Paris as winners step up onto the final Podium.

Elevation gain: 195m
Last edited by Fyr3 on 20/07/2021, 23:33, edited 7 times in total.
"Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving." - Albert Einstein
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Belgian4444
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Posts: 41
Joined: 08/02/2017, 13:38

Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by Belgian4444 »

Fyr3 wrote: 14/07/2021, 20:51 Fyr3's Tour de France 2021

Route Map
Image

Route Summary
Hello all today I present my route summary for my Tour de France 2021. Starting in Bretagne with individual stages in Finistère, Côtes-d'Armor and Morbihan, the winding roads, windy coastlines and sharp rises of the region will characterise this Grand Départ. The opening stage from Brest to Châteaulin suits the skill-set of many riders in the peloton, while the second stage up the famous Mûr-de-Bretagne will truly open the GC battle, with a third stage finishing on the Quiberon Peninsula where the wind can blow strongly. On stage 4 we say our final goodbye to Bretagne, departing from La Roche-Bernard.

Stage 4 heads into the department of Loire-Atlantique, for a stage that follows the coastline before heading up the famous Loire to finish in the city of Nantes, another day where the favourites must be wary of the wind. Vendée once again hosts a stage in the Tour after the Grand Départ in 2018, with an individual time trial of 40km from Saint-Gilles-Croix-de-Vie to the famous Passage du Gois, which hosted the start of the 2011 Tour 10 years ago. After a transfer, the peloton will tackle a long stage between Angers and Tours, with the Tour de France taking for the first time ever to the gravel roads that characterise Paris-Tours, inciting potential chaos of the likes we haven't seen since John Degenkolb won in Roubaix. The race then heads to Châteauroux for a sprint finish on stage 7, before stage 8 hosts a finish at the famous Circuit de Charade, that has hosted the French Grand Prix 4 times. The first week finally ends with a summit finish on the Croix de Chaubouret.

After the first rest day in Isère, a lumpy stage between L'Isle-d'Abeau and Romans-sur-Isère could be one for many riders, before the Alps begin with back-to-back summit finishes at La Toussuire and Risoul. Another hard day on stage 13 will see the peloton pass through the Gorges du Verdon for a probable breakway success in Aix-en-Provence, followed by a spectacle double ascent of Mont Ventoux on stage 14, and a rolling day with a threat of crosswinds into Nîmes ahead of the rest day.

The riders will stay in Nîmes for the rest day, before returning to action in a flat stage to Carcassonne, and tackling a succession of 3 Pyrenean stages. First the Port de Lers and Col de la Core should interest the escapees, with a potential for long range attacks to the finish line in Saint-Girons. Then a short stage with a deadly sequence of the Port de Balès and the climb to Superbagnères. Finally, a compact but ultimately decisive mountain stage starting out in Saint-Gaudens and crossing the Aspin and Tourmalet passes for a finish at Luz Ardiden, which last saw Thomas Voeckler's defence of yellow in 2011. After this dreadful third week, a final opportunity for the sprinters in a transition stage to Libourne, before a final stage that will go down in history as only the second time the Tour de France has ended with an Individual time trial on the Champs-Élysées in front of the Arc de Triomphe.

Statistics
-21 stages with a total of 3458km raced, and an average distance on road stages of 178.5km.
-2 Individual Time Trials with a total of 66km.
-7 Flat stages.
-5 Hilly or Medium Mountain stages.
-7 High Mountain stages with 5 summit finishes.
-8 regions crossed, with a total of 33 departments visited.
-31 mountain passes (category 2 to HC) with a total of 73 classified climbs.
-A shortest road stage of 128km (stage 19)
-A longest road stage of 220km (stage 16)
-6 Bonus points across the race (Mûr-de-Bretagne, Col de la Baraque, Col d'Izoard, Mont Ventoux, Port de Balès, Col du Tourmalet)
-Stage 11 features the most positive elevation gain with 4688m
-The longest transfer is 156km between the Passage du Gois and Angers, which would take a comparatively similar time to the transfer between Le Creusot and Oyonnax in the real Tour (~ 2 hours.)
-Most of the route's transfers aside from the one to Paris are less than an hour long, with many far less as the town hosts both a start and finish.
-The highest point on the route, designated Souvenir Henri Desgrange, will be the 2642m Col du Galibier from Valloire. The climb is one of 4 on the route above 2000m in altitude.
-The toughest summit finishes on this year's route will be the final climbs to Superbagnères and Luz Ardiden on stages 18 and 19, while the hardest pass on the entire route is the Mont Ventoux on stage 14.
-In 1989, the only other year the race finished with the Champs-Élysées time trial, the winning margin in the overall was just 8 seconds.
-Doubled KOM points on climbs above 2000m (Croix-de-Fer, Col du Galibier, Col d'Izoard and Col du Tourmalet.)

Route Presentation
Spoiler!

Stage 1 - Brest > Châteaulin - Hilly - 194km

Image

Stage 1 from Brest to Châteaulin should see a large group of riders interested in taking the first yellow jersey. Solo artists will no doubt try to use the short climbs in the final kilometres to try and escape, while sprinters who can climb like Colbrelli will try to hang on over the toughest climbs to win on the short false flat sprint up to the line in Châteaulin. There should also be quite a battle for the first KOM jersey, with no less than 14 points available throughout the stage. Châteaulin is perhaps best known as the host of the Boucles de l'Aulne, and has seen the Tour pass through it several times, including a passage during 2018, and a time trial in the past also.

Stage 2 - Perros-Guirec > Mûr-de-Bretagne Guerlédan - Hilly - 149km

Image

With the first yellow jersey handed out, it will be difficult to cling on to it in this short but irregular stage between the seaside resort of Perros-Guirec and the famous final climb up the Mûr. Riders such as Alexis Vuillermoz and Dan Martin have been victorious here in the past. With bonus seconds to also be handed out on the first passage of the climb, the GC battle could be very tight, and we could already see some big loosers in the peloton after the opening weekend.

Stage 3 - Lorient > Quiberon - Flat - 217.5km

Image

Quiberon and its peninsula welcomes the Tour de France for the first sprint stage. The opening half of the stage is lumpy, and with two categorised climbs will see yet more fighting over the Polka-dot Jersey, but the second half of the stage is where most of the action is likely to occur. After Vannes and the intermediate sprint, the roads are largely wide and open with little shelter from the wind coming off the often stormy Atlantic Coast. Should the wind blow strongly, we could see the peloton splinter in the 50km or so of roads around and on the peninsula before we get to the finish line.

Stage 4 - La Roche-Bernard > Nantes - Flat - 161km

Image

The peloton gets underway once a gain for a stage fraught with danger posed by the wind. The riders will also pass over the famous Pont-de-Saint-Nazaire, before a likely sprint finish in the city of Nantes.

Stage 5 - Saint-Gilles-Croix-de-Vie > Le Passage du Gois - Individual time trial - 41.5km

Image

The famous submersible road of the Passage du Gois will be visited once again after the Tour departed from here in 2011. The riders will not have to cross the submersible part of the road itself due to the issue with tides and schedules for the race, however, the 42km route between saint-Gilles-Croix-de-Vie - a commune nearby the famous resort of Saint-Hilaire-de-Riez - and the finish line should shake up the general classification and be the basis for the next 3 weeks of racing.

Stage 6 - Angers > Tours - Hilly - 207km

Image

Stage 6 of this year's route sees a big hurdle for the riders targeting the overall standings in Paris. Despite the 150km flat introduction to the route, the final 50km will take place on short hills and narrow gravel sectors commonly seen in the autumn classic Paris-Tours. Riders on a bad day or caught out of position, and even those suffering with punctures and so forth on such a day, can quickly find themselves loosing time to rivals. The nature of the route lends itself to riders comfortable on unpaved roads and who can climb, notably the likes of Søren Kragh Andersen, a former Paris-Tours winner, and punchers who can ride on days like these such as Benoît Cosnefroy. Expect the yellow jersey to potentially change today.

Stage 7 - Tours > Châteauroux - Flat - 160.5km

Image

The roads of stage 7 offer a final chance for the pure sprinters to take victory before the first rest day. Mark Cavendish is a favorite to win on the roads of the town that took him to victory back in 2008.

Stage 8 - Montluçon > Circuit de Charade - Medium mountain - 147.5km

Image

The spectacle of the riders battling it out on one of the most beautiful circuits in the world, the Circuit de Charade, will be no doubt entertaining, whether or not the GC men decide to get involved. Situated on an extinct Volcano, the chicanes and fast bends of the track should decide victory if a rider has not yet dropped his opponents on the 2 final climbs. For GC riders, its an opportunity to potentially gain a few seconds.

Stage 9 - Vichy > Croix de Chaubouret - High mountain - 198km

Image

Before the first rest day of the race, riders will no doubt be ready to give it everything they have left after a draining first week to hang on over the final climb of the Croix de Chaubouret. 10km long at 6.7%, it is by no means the toughest of the race. However, after this first week of racing, it will no doubt take its toll on riders over the coming days, and potentially play a role in deciding the overall standings in Paris.

Rest day in Isère

Stage 10 - L'Isle-d'Abeau > Romans-sur-Isère - Flat - 158km

Image

After the first rest day of this Tour de France, the roads of the Isère and Drôme departments will host a stage that has no clear favourite. A breakaway success? A solo attack in the final kilometres? A mass sprint? A reduced sprint? Whatever the case, whoever takes the spoils in Romans is certainly an accomplished rider.

Stage 11 - Domène > La Toussuire - High mountain - 174km

Image

Second mountain stage of the Tour, and a second summit finish but this time far more selective. The sequence of Croix-de-Fer > Col du Mollard > La Toussuire offers up plenty of opportunity for attacks, while those in the break will be happy as there are several KOM points to pick up points on during the stage.

Stage 12 - Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne > Risoul 1850 - High mountain - 149km

Image

Stage 12 features the second consecutive summit finish of the Alps, on what is arguably one of the toughest stages in the race. Featuring the Télégraphe, Galibier and Izoard mountain passes, before a finish at the resort of Risoul, today's winner is no doubt an excellent climber. With 2 first category and 2 HC ascents, there will also be plenty of KOM points on offer given the double points above 2000m.

Stage 13 - Digne-les-Bains > Aix-en-Provence - Hilly - 212km

Image

As most viewers return from a last day at work and sit down to watch the Tour, they will be greeted with the spectacle of the beautiful Gorges du Verdon through which the race shall pass. Several climbs on the menu, not least 3 category 2 passes, means the stage will most likely go to a breakaway rider, although watch out for guys like Colbrelli and Matthews to try and make the moves to secure Green Jersey points.

Stage 14 - Sorgues > Malaucène - High mountain - 199km

Image

The double ascent of the Ventoux is to be feared, the stage potentially a contender for the title of "Queen stage." Riders will have to attack far out from the summit of the second ascent, so as to have enough of a gap on the fast descent to hold off any chasing groups.

Stage 15 - Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux > Nîmes - Flat - 159km

Image

The final stage before the rest day will see riders vying for victory in the city of Nîmes. After a passage through the spectacular Gorges de l'Ardèche, riders will need to be weary of the wind blowing at the start line and after Uzès.

Rest day in Nîmes

Stage 16 - Nîmes > Carcassonne - Flat - 219.5km

Image

The narrow technical roads common in the departments of Aude and Hérault will define the day after the rest day, with sprinters teams having to control the race from early on to be in with a chance of victory in the historic town of Carcassonne.

Stage 17 - Carcassonne > Saint-Girons - High mountain - 218.5km

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The finale into Saint-Girons has breakaway written all over it. The first of the stages in the Pyrenees lends itself to a large break going up the road, with mountain points scattered across the route. The climbs of the Port de Lers and Col de la Core should prove decisive in the fight for a stage win, and could even shape a little action in the GC group behind as there is just 20km of mostly downhill after the final ascent to play with. The french will be extremly motivated for this day, as it is the 14th of July, Bastille day, a day upon which Warren Barguil the Breton rider won back in 2017.

Stage 18 - Saint-Girons > Superbagnères - High mountain - 129.5km

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First of two successive summit finishes in the final mountain range, the resort of Superbagnères hosts a stage above the town of Luchon. The sequence of the Port de Balès when combined with the final climb makes for a deadly combo. Roadworks are currently underway to restore a bridge on the ascent that would allow the passage of some race vehicles, however if a scenario occurs where the ski resort cannot host the stage because of delays, then the finish will be adjudged at the bottom of the penultimate climb in Luchon.

Stage 19 - Saint-Gaudens > Luz Ardiden - High mountain - 127.5km

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Final mountain stage of this Tour, and Luz Ardiden makes its return after the heroic defenses of Thomas Voeckler back in 2011. The sequence of the Aspin and Tourmalet passes before it will make it both a key stage in the fight for the KOM jersey, and a final opportunity for the climbers to gain time in GC before the final time trial.

Stage 20 - Mourenx > Libourne - Flat stage - 207km

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The final opportunity for the sprinters to pick up points in the Green jersey presents itself on stage 20. After that, there will be no usual parade and easy run in to Paris to celebrate.

Stage 21 - Versailles > Paris Champs-Élysées - Individual time trial - 24.5km

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Following a similar route to that of the final time trial of 1989, for only the second time in the Tour's history the race will culminate with a time trial on the Champs-Élysées in Paris. Passing through the Louvre and the Place de la Concorde, the race will be decided in front of the Arc de Triomphe, and great emotions will be felt around Paris as winners step up onto the final Podium.
You forgot your route link ;)
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by Fyr3 »

Thanks I always forget it :D

maps/tours/view/18900
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by emmea90 »

espana7 wrote: 14/07/2021, 20:50 Hi,
I want to ask a bit of an off topic question (very sorry for disturbing the pace of the tdf routes incoming). There won't be a Tour de Suisse contest this year? I know it has already ended a month ago, but last time i heard it doesn't hurt to ask :)

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Hi. No, there won't be.
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by PilipHannah »

Fyr3 wrote: 14/07/2021, 23:42 Thanks I always forget it :D

https://www.la-flamme-rouge.eu/maps/tours/view/18900/employee monitoring
Thank you!
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Will4563
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by Will4563 »

How can you make a route map like that?
Fyr3 wrote: 14/07/2021, 20:51 Fyr3's Tour de France 2021

Link to LFR route (beware stage errors because of GPX stuff on stage 12 / 13) - maps/tours/view/18900

Route Map
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Route Summary
Hello all today I present my route summary for my Tour de France 2021. Starting in Bretagne with individual stages in Finistère, Côtes-d'Armor and Morbihan, the winding roads, windy coastlines and sharp rises of the region will characterise this Grand Départ. The opening stage from Brest to Châteaulin suits the skill-set of many riders in the peloton, while the second stage up the famous Mûr-de-Bretagne will truly open the GC battle, with a third stage finishing on the Quiberon Peninsula where the wind can blow strongly. On stage 4 we say our final goodbye to Bretagne, departing from La Roche-Bernard.

Stage 4 heads into the department of Loire-Atlantique, for a stage that follows the coastline before heading up the famous Loire to finish in the city of Nantes, another day where the favourites must be wary of the wind. Vendée once again hosts a stage in the Tour after the Grand Départ in 2018, with an individual time trial of 40km from Saint-Gilles-Croix-de-Vie to the famous Passage du Gois, which hosted the start of the 2011 Tour 10 years ago. After a transfer, the peloton will tackle a long stage between Angers and Tours, with the Tour de France taking for the first time ever to the gravel roads that characterise Paris-Tours, inciting potential chaos of the likes we haven't seen since John Degenkolb won in Roubaix. The race then heads to Châteauroux for a sprint finish on stage 7, before stage 8 hosts a finish at the famous Circuit de Charade, that has hosted the French Grand Prix 4 times. The first week finally ends with a summit finish on the Croix de Chaubouret.

After the first rest day in Isère, a lumpy stage between L'Isle-d'Abeau and Romans-sur-Isère could be one for many riders, before the Alps begin with back-to-back summit finishes at La Toussuire and Risoul. Another hard day on stage 13 will see the peloton pass through the Gorges du Verdon for a probable breakway success in Aix-en-Provence, followed by a spectacle double ascent of Mont Ventoux on stage 14, and a rolling day with a threat of crosswinds into Nîmes ahead of the rest day.

The riders will stay in Nîmes for the rest day, before returning to action in a flat stage to Carcassonne, and tackling a succession of 3 Pyrenean stages. First the Port de Lers and Col de la Core should interest the escapees, with a potential for long range attacks to the finish line in Saint-Girons. Then a short stage with a deadly sequence of the Port de Balès and the climb to Superbagnères. Finally, a compact but ultimately decisive mountain stage starting out in Saint-Gaudens and crossing the Aspin and Tourmalet passes for a finish at Luz Ardiden, which last saw Thomas Voeckler's defence of yellow in 2011. After this dreadful third week, a final opportunity for the sprinters in a transition stage to Libourne, before a final stage that will go down in history as only the second time the Tour de France has ended with an Individual time trial on the Champs-Élysées in front of the Arc de Triomphe.

Statistics
-21 stages with a total of 3458km raced, and an average distance on road stages of 178.5km.
-2 Individual Time Trials with a total of 66km.
-7 Flat stages.
-5 Hilly or Medium Mountain stages.
-7 High Mountain stages with 5 summit finishes.
-8 regions crossed, with a total of 33 departments visited.
-31 mountain passes (category 2 to HC) with a total of 73 classified climbs.
-A shortest road stage of 128km (stage 19)
-A longest road stage of 220km (stage 16)
-6 Bonus points across the race (Mûr-de-Bretagne, Col de la Baraque, Col d'Izoard, Mont Ventoux, Port de Balès, Col du Tourmalet)
-Stage 11 features the most positive elevation gain with 4688m
-The longest transfer is 156km between the Passage du Gois and Angers, which would take a comparatively similar time to the transfer between Le Creusot and Oyonnax in the real Tour (~ 2 hours.)
-Most of the route's transfers aside from the one to Paris are less than an hour long, with many far less as the town hosts both a start and finish.
-The highest point on the route, designated Souvenir Henri Desgrange, will be the 2642m Col du Galibier from Valloire. The climb is one of 4 on the route above 2000m in altitude.
-The toughest summit finishes on this year's route will be the final climbs to Superbagnères and Luz Ardiden on stages 18 and 19, while the hardest pass on the entire route is the Mont Ventoux on stage 14.
-In 1989, the only other year the race finished with the Champs-Élysées time trial, the winning margin in the overall was just 8 seconds.
-Doubled KOM points on climbs above 2000m (Croix-de-Fer, Col du Galibier, Col d'Izoard and Col du Tourmalet.)
-Stage 5 features the lowest elevation gain of 154, while the highest is recorded on stage 11 (4702m)
-In total according to Open Runner the combined elevation gain of the 21 stages is 54465m!

Route Presentation
Spoiler!

Stage 1 - Brest > Châteaulin - Hilly - 194km

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Stage 1 from Brest to Châteaulin should see a large group of riders interested in taking the first yellow jersey. Solo artists will no doubt try to use the short climbs in the final kilometres to try and escape, while sprinters who can climb like Colbrelli will try to hang on over the toughest climbs to win on the short false flat sprint up to the line in Châteaulin. There should also be quite a battle for the first KOM jersey, with no less than 14 points available throughout the stage. Châteaulin is perhaps best known as the host of the Boucles de l'Aulne, and has seen the Tour pass through it several times, including a passage during 2018, and a time trial in the past also.

Elevation gain: 3002m

Stage 2 - Perros-Guirec > Mûr-de-Bretagne Guerlédan - Hilly - 149km

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With the first yellow jersey handed out, it will be difficult to cling on to it in this short but irregular stage between the seaside resort of Perros-Guirec and the famous final climb up the Mûr. Riders such as Alexis Vuillermoz and Dan Martin have been victorious here in the past. With bonus seconds to also be handed out on the first passage of the climb, the GC battle could be very tight, and we could already see some big loosers in the peloton after the opening weekend.

Elevation gain: 1934m

Stage 3 - Lorient > Quiberon - Flat - 217.5km

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Quiberon and its peninsula welcomes the Tour de France for the first sprint stage. The opening half of the stage is lumpy, and with two categorised climbs will see yet more fighting over the Polka-dot Jersey, but the second half of the stage is where most of the action is likely to occur. After Vannes and the intermediate sprint, the roads are largely wide and open with little shelter from the wind coming off the often stormy Atlantic Coast. Should the wind blow strongly, we could see the peloton splinter in the 50km or so of roads around and on the peninsula before we get to the finish line.

Elevation gain: 2058m

Stage 4 - La Roche-Bernard > Nantes - Flat - 161km

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The peloton gets underway once a gain for a stage fraught with danger posed by the wind. The riders will also pass over the famous Pont-de-Saint-Nazaire, before a likely sprint finish in the city of Nantes.

Elevation gain: 984m

Stage 5 - Saint-Gilles-Croix-de-Vie > Le Passage du Gois - Individual time trial - 41.5km

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The famous submersible road of the Passage du Gois will be visited once again after the Tour departed from here in 2011. The riders will not have to cross the submersible part of the road itself due to the issue with tides and schedules for the race, however, the 42km route between saint-Gilles-Croix-de-Vie - a commune nearby the famous resort of Saint-Hilaire-de-Riez - and the finish line should shake up the general classification and be the basis for the next 3 weeks of racing.

Elevation gain: 154m

Stage 6 - Angers > Tours - Hilly - 207km

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Stage 6 of this year's route sees a big hurdle for the riders targeting the overall standings in Paris. Despite the 150km flat introduction to the route, the final 50km will take place on short hills and narrow gravel sectors commonly seen in the autumn classic Paris-Tours. Riders on a bad day or caught out of position, and even those suffering with punctures and so forth on such a day, can quickly find themselves loosing time to rivals. The nature of the route lends itself to riders comfortable on unpaved roads and who can climb, notably the likes of Søren Kragh Andersen, a former Paris-Tours winner, and punchers who can ride on days like these such as Benoît Cosnefroy. Expect the yellow jersey to potentially change today.

Elevation gain: 937m

Stage 7 - Tours > Châteauroux - Flat - 160.5km

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The roads of stage 7 offer a final chance for the pure sprinters to take victory before the first rest day. Mark Cavendish is a favorite to win on the roads of the town that took him to victory back in 2008.

Elevation gain: 1143m

Stage 8 - Montluçon > Circuit de Charade - Medium mountain - 147.5km

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The spectacle of the riders battling it out on one of the most beautiful circuits in the world, the Circuit de Charade, will be no doubt entertaining, whether or not the GC men decide to get involved. Situated on an extinct Volcano, the chicanes and fast bends of the track should decide victory if a rider has not yet dropped his opponents on the 2 final climbs. For GC riders, its an opportunity to potentially gain a few seconds.

Elevation gain: 2489m

Stage 9 - Vichy > Croix de Chaubouret - High mountain - 198km

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Before the first rest day of the race, riders will no doubt be ready to give it everything they have left after a draining first week to hang on over the final climb of the Croix de Chaubouret. 10km long at 6.7%, it is by no means the toughest of the race. However, after this first week of racing, it will no doubt take its toll on riders over the coming days, and potentially play a role in deciding the overall standings in Paris.

Elevation gain: 3088m

Rest day in Isère

Stage 10 - L'Isle-d'Abeau > Romans-sur-Isère - Flat - 158km

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After the first rest day of this Tour de France, the roads of the Isère and Drôme departments will host a stage that has no clear favourite. A breakaway success? A solo attack in the final kilometres? A mass sprint? A reduced sprint? Whatever the case, whoever takes the spoils in Romans is certainly an accomplished rider.

Elevation gain: 1873m

Stage 11 - Domène > La Toussuire - High mountain - 174km

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Second mountain stage of the Tour, and a second summit finish but this time far more selective. The sequence of Croix-de-Fer > Col du Mollard > La Toussuire offers up plenty of opportunity for attacks, while those in the break will be happy as there are several KOM points to pick up points on during the stage.

Elevation gain: 4702m

Stage 12 - Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne > Risoul 1850 - High mountain - 149km

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Stage 12 features the second consecutive summit finish of the Alps, on what is arguably one of the toughest stages in the race. Featuring the Télégraphe, Galibier and Izoard mountain passes, before a finish at the resort of Risoul, today's winner is no doubt an excellent climber. With 2 first category and 2 HC ascents, there will also be plenty of KOM points on offer given the double points above 2000m.

Elevation gain: 4549m

Stage 13 - Digne-les-Bains > Aix-en-Provence - Hilly - 212km

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As most viewers return from a last day at work and sit down to watch the Tour, they will be greeted with the spectacle of the beautiful Gorges du Verdon through which the race shall pass. Several climbs on the menu, not least 3 category 2 passes, means the stage will most likely go to a breakaway rider, although watch out for guys like Colbrelli and Matthews to try and make the moves to secure Green Jersey points.

Elevation gain: 3216m

Stage 14 - Sorgues > Malaucène - High mountain - 199km

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The double ascent of the Ventoux is to be feared, the stage potentially a contender for the title of "Queen stage." Riders will have to attack far out from the summit of the second ascent, so as to have enough of a gap on the fast descent to hold off any chasing groups.

Elevation gain: 4605m

Stage 15 - Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux > Nîmes - Flat - 159km

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The final stage before the rest day will see riders vying for victory in the city of Nîmes. After a passage through the spectacular Gorges de l'Ardèche, riders will need to be weary of the wind blowing at the start line and after Uzès.

Elevation gain: 1923m

Rest day in Nîmes

Stage 16 - Nîmes > Carcassonne - Flat - 219.5km

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The narrow technical roads common in the departments of Aude and Hérault will define the day after the rest day, with sprinters teams having to control the race from early on to be in with a chance of victory in the historic town of Carcassonne.

Elevation gain: 2260m

Stage 17 - Carcassonne > Saint-Girons - High mountain - 218.5km

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The finale into Saint-Girons has breakaway written all over it. The first of the stages in the Pyrenees lends itself to a large break going up the road, with mountain points scattered across the route. The climbs of the Port de Lers and Col de la Core should prove decisive in the fight for a stage win, and could even shape a little action in the GC group behind as there is just 30km of mostly downhill after the final ascent to play with. The french will be extremly motivated for this day, as it is the 14th of July, Bastille day, a day upon which Warren Barguil the Breton rider won back in 2017.

Elevation gain: 3935m

Stage 18 - Saint-Girons > Superbagnères - High mountain - 129.5km

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First of two successive summit finishes in the final mountain range, the resort of Superbagnères hosts a stage above the town of Luchon. The sequence of the Port de Balès when combined with the final climb makes for a deadly combo. Roadworks are currently underway to restore a bridge on the ascent that would allow the passage of some race vehicles, however if a scenario occurs where the ski resort cannot host the stage because of delays, then the finish will be adjudged at the bottom of the penultimate climb in Luchon.

Elevation gain: 3988m

Stage 19 - Saint-Gaudens > Luz Ardiden - High mountain - 127.5km

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Final mountain stage of this Tour, and Luz Ardiden makes its return after the heroic defenses of Thomas Voeckler back in 2011. The sequence of the Aspin and Tourmalet passes before it will make it both a key stage in the fight for the KOM jersey, and a final opportunity for the climbers to gain time in GC before the final time trial.

Elevation gain: 3681m

Stage 20 - Mourenx > Libourne - Flat stage - 207km

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The final opportunity for the sprinters to pick up points in the Green jersey presents itself on stage 20. After that, there will be no usual parade and easy run in to Paris to celebrate.

Elevation gain: 1693m

Stage 21 - Versailles > Paris Champs-Élysées - Individual time trial - 24.5km

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Following a similar route to that of the final time trial of 1989, for only the second time in the Tour's history the race will culminate with a time trial on the Champs-Élysées in Paris. Passing through the Louvre and the Place de la Concorde, the race will be decided in front of the Arc de Triomphe, and great emotions will be felt around Paris as winners step up onto the final Podium.

Elevation gain: 195m
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by Fyr3 »

Will4563 wrote: 16/07/2021, 15:04 How can you make a route map like that?
1.) Get the basemap for the race, I found it here, you have to leave the page in french otherwise the spoiler won't open and you won't be able to get the image: https://legruppetto.fr/forum/viewtopic. ... 1#p1884461

It's the first spoiler under "Outils pour réaliser une carte" if you want the Tour de France background as I assume.

2.) Use the pictograms found on the same link as above, along with tools in an editor such as paint.net to create the map like I did.
"Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving." - Albert Einstein
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SMASGUN
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by SMASGUN »

Pourquoi quand je veux créé une étape ca mais longtemps a charger et ça fait "No valid route" ?
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jibvalverde
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by jibvalverde »

Here is my Tour de France for this contest : maps/tours/view/19157
Spoiler!
Stage 1 : Brest > Brest, 9km TTT
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For the first time in its history, the Tour de France will start by a team time-trial of 9km in the streets of Brest. Not very technical but not all flat either, it will create some gasps but not much.
----
Stage 2 : Landerneau > Douadernez, 186,5km
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A « like Liege-Bastogne-Liege » stage with no less than 18 climbs on the road. We will pass by some of the highest climbs of Bretagne, like Roc’h Tredudon ou Menez Meur, and there will be not time-out until the finish line, located at Douadernez after a last climb of 800m at 6,4%.
----
Stage 3 : Quimper > Quiberon, 174km
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First sprint in Quiberon. There is no difficulty in the stage, except a final exposed at the wind between Carnac and Quiberon. The final kilometer is not completely straight but will not be dangerous at all.
Stage 4 : Vannes > La Roche-sur-Yon, 210km
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It can be a massive sprint but it’s not totally sure because of a final very particular. After Rocherservière, the peloton will ride only on narrow roads, where placement will be key until the 5km of non-gravel road of La Guilbretière, at 6,5km of the arrival. So Massive sprint or not ?
----
Stage 5 : Les Herbiers > Tours, 197,5km
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An other tricky stage which could suit to a solid sprinter but also to a puncher like Alaphilippe. The sequence in the final of 8 climbs – shorts (250m to 1km) but tough (3 are 9% average) - in 26km will scatter the peloton of multiple smalls groups. But be careful of the 14kms fof flat to reach the arrival.
----
Stage 6 : Loche > Montluçon, 177km
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Sprint stage, no doubt about it. It will be useful to pay attention to the wind in the final, but echelons is not probable in these roads.
----
Stage 7 : Moulins > Villefranche-sur-Saône, 223km
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The real stage 7 of Le Creusot inspired me the idea of such a stage, but in the road of Villefranche-sur-Saône. A stage quite long, easy of its first part, very tough one its second part, with multiple ascents such as the Col de la Croix de Theil (4,3km at 8%), first 2nd cat of the Tour de France.
----
Stage 8 : Lyon > Chambéry, 187km
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First mountain stage of this edition and a stage which we’v never seen in the Alpes. Mont du chat et Mont Revard are back with the inedite côte de Perthuiset (5,8km à 8,1%), which will make Mont Revard a little more thougher. A real stage for climbers.
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Stage 9 : Albertville > Oz-en-Oisans, 137km
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It’s the queen stage of the Alpes with the sequence of two of the most iconic climbs of the massif : col de la Madeleine (25,2km à 6,3%) and col du Glandon (20km à 7%), which will be only at 32km at the arrival. A perfect climb to make a move because the final ascent if not so tough, with only 7,3km à 7,6% to climb to the station of Oz-en-Oisans.

REST

Stage 10 : Grenoble > Gap, 192km
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A transition stage is never a simple stage and this one fits too. With 103 first kilometers climbing until the Col du Festre (12,5km à 4,1%), sprinters will be in difficulty and there’s absolutely not certitude of seeing a sprinter winning in Gap. Even if a massive peloton catchs the breakway, there are some traps, with two little climbs (1km à 4,3% and 600m à 7%) in the final 9 kilometers.
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Stage 11 : Sisteron > Malaucène, 188km
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Only one climb of the Ventoux but a stage as tough at least as the real one. As soon as riders leave Sisteron, they will attack one of the forgotten climb of France, the Montagne de Lure (22,6km à 5,2%). After a 40kms of transition, peloton will arrive on the climb of Lagarde d’Apt (11,5km à 6,8%) before going to Salt and go down to Flassan to go on Ventoux by the Bedoin side (17,2km à 8,5%). A very tough one.
----
Stage 12 : Nîmes > Carcassonne, 222km
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On paper, an easy stage for sprinters, with only Mont Saint-Clair (1,6km at 10,4%), in first part. But, in reality, the stage is very tricky, like always in this area. After Mont Saint-Clair, there are many sections where echelons could happen, with roads exposed to the wind. And the non-gravel sector of Chemin du Muscat could split the peloton too. So a dangereous day.
----
Stage 13 : Castelnaudary > Revel, 33km ITT
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It’s the only individual time-trial of the race, with 33 kilometers traced between Castelnaudary and Revel and which suited perfectly to a specialist. The climbers could loose many minutes.
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Stage 14 : Muret > Col du Portet, 187km
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The stage seems a lot like the real one with the sequence Azet-Portet in the final. The major change is the disparition of Peyresourde. Riders will climb at first the tough but short (4,8km à 8,5%) Côte de Lançon. But everything will be played in the final climb, the toughest of this Tour de France.
----
Stage 15 : Pau > Lac d'Estaing, 191km
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It’s the big stage in the Pyrenees and, already, the last high mountain stage. After a tough start on the flat, peloton will climb Col de la Hourcère (12,2km at 8,2%), Col d’Ichère (4,3km à 6,5%), Col de Marie-Blanque by its hardest side (9,5km at 7,5% and 4km at 10% to finish) and Col d’Aubisque (17,2km at 7,1%). At the summit of the final climb, it will remain 29km to reach Lac d’Estaing, via three little climbs : Soulor (2,2km at 5,3%), Bordères (3,4km at 8%) and the final climb to Lac d’Estaing (5,2km at 3,3%). It will require to be offensive to create some gasps.

REST

Stage 16 : Libourne > Bordeaux, 204km
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Hard stage to start third week with an “Amstel like” stage. If there’s only 10 climbs in mountain classification, there are in reality three times more! A rider in a bad day could lost the Tour de France and it would not be surprising to see a solo victory in Bordeaux. There will be gaps !
----
Stage 17 : Bergerac > Figeac, 183km
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No trick and an easy stage, which will suits the sprinters perfectly.
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Stage 18 : Rodez > Puy-en-Velay, 214km
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Sprinters can once again hope the victory today but it will be a lot more difficult for them, with nearly 30km of climbing between km 83 and km 113 but also between km 143 and km 173. Not an hard day but not an easy one neither.
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Stage 19 : Puy-en-Velay > Craponne-sur-Arzon, 222km
Image
One of the hardest day in the Tour de France. If riders will be in Massif Central, this stage will suits climbers and riders who likes very long stage. With no more than 13 climbs, it will be a tough day. The Côte de Meallier (5,8km at 7,2%) and the Col de la Charousse (13,2km at 6,2%) will make a first selection but the favorites will make their move in Mur d’Aurec-sur-Loire (3,5km at 11%), at 58km to the finish. Three climbs will be left and not a single meter of flat.
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Stage 20 : Massiac > Bort-les-Orgues, 160km
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An other tough day but a little less than yesterday, despite the 12 climbs of the stage. With only 160km, this stage suits climbers who will dare to attack far from the finish with Col de Baladour (14,5km at 4,2% but 6km at 8% for start) at km 29 but, first of all, with the sequence of Côte du Bois de Combret (2,3km at 11,8%)-Côte de Bagil (1,9km at 11%)-Côte d’Apchon (1,9km at 9,7%), between 88km and 51km toe the arrival. Final of the stage is more “easy” but tricky too. The leader could completely loose yellow jersey today.
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Stage 21 : Rambouillet - Château > Paris - Champs Elysées, 112km
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Classique final stage with a start in Yvelines and a first part in Chevreuse’s valley, before to go to Paris to reach the Champs-Elysées. Be careful, there will be only four laps. Sprinters should be ready.
Last edited by jibvalverde on 21/07/2021, 18:15, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by IamCeeKae »

Contest submission: IamCeeKae
maps/tours/view/19170
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by Micek_52 »

My submission for the contest: maps/tours/view/19198

I designed the race to look like what I imagined the route would be, after the Bretagne start was first anounced.

I must say that I really struggled to make a valid route. Especially problematic were the rules prohibiting repeating key points and the one with two non-MTF high mountain stages. I had to redo stages 10-12 five times because of this. Also for the pyrenean stages, I had problems with the realistic transfer to Paris, as all modern editions with the Pyrenean final ended with a flat/hilly ITT (and I hate ITTs on the 20th stage of TdF especially flat ones), meaning, I had no reference where to finish. So the last mountain stage might be strange. All in all it is not exactly how I wanted it to turn out, but it is the best I could do.

I must give two warnings:
1. The Roubaix stage (Nr. 5) doesnt count as a flat stage (no 3 second rule) - so there aren't four flat stages in a row, but only two (6 and 7)
2. The Planche doesn't fall into the key point category, as an ITT climb can be reused as a road stage climb next year and vice-versa.
Spoiler!

Overall plan:
21 stages (7 flat, 5 medium mountain, 7 high mountain and 2 ITT's of 36km total)
64 classified climbs (17xC4, 12xC3, 14xC2, 13xC1, 8xHC)
3336 kilometres (158/day on average, shortest stage 98km, longest 224km)
-----

STAGE 1, 26.06.21 - Brest/Brest (ITT, 14km)
Image
For safety reasons, my version of the 2021 Tour de France starts with an ITT around Brest. The person with the fastest time from Intermediate 2 to Finish line will also take the first polka-dot jersey.

STAGE 2, 27.06.21 - Brest/Loncoran (Hilly, 186km)
Image
A hilly stage in Brittany. The stage combines the climbs from 2021 and 2018 editions of the race and finishes on the Montagne de Loncoran.

STAGE 3, 28.06.21 - Quimper/Mur-de-Bretagne (Hilly, 179.5km)
Image
A standard Mur-de-Bretagne stage. Nothing more nothing less. The first of five sets of bonus seconds is awarded on the first pass of the Mur.

STAGE 4, 29.06.21 - Saint-Malo/Deauville (Flat-ish, 224.5km)
Image
Kind of a flat stage through Normandy, which offers the first chance for sprinters.

STAGE 5, 30.06.21 - Amiens/Cambrai (Flat with Cobblestones, 178.5km)
Image
A flat stage with a twist - 7 sections of cobblestones totaling 15,5 km, including the famous Trouee d' Arenberg. As the 3-second rule doesn't apply for Cobbled stages, this one is NOT for pure sprinters, and doesn't count as a flat stage for the "No 3 flat stages in a row" rule.

STAGE 6, 01.07.21 - Saint-Quentin/Verdun (Flat, 215.5km)
Image
The next chance for sprinters in the eastern part of France

STAGE 7, 02.07.21 - Metz/Strasbourg (Flat, 192.5km)
Image
2nd pure sprinters flat stage in a row, as we approach the Vosges and the first mountain tests.

STAGE 8, 03.07.21 - Colmar/Gerardmer (M. Mountain, 172.5km)
Image
A medium-mountain stage in the Vosges mountains.

STAGE 9, 04.07.21 - Mulhouse/Le Grand Ballon (Mountain, 158km)
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The first high mountain stage of the race, featuring some of the more iconic climbs in the Vosges mountain range.

-----REST DAY-----

STAGE 10, 06.07.21 - Annecy/Alpe d' Huez (Mountain, 175km)
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A mountain stage passing Col du Glandon, where another set of bonus seconds will be awarded, before finishing 200 metres above Alpe'd Huez.

STAGE 11, 07.07.21 - Bourg d' Oisans/Embrun (Mountain, 174.5km)
Image
A stage with two iconic Alpine passes - Lautaret and Izoard in the first half, which is then followed by a stretch of flat road, before a C2 climb and a descent to the finish line.

STAGE 12, 08.07.21 - Gap/Avignon (Flat, 190.5km)
Image
Apart from a small bump in the middle, this stage is almost entirely downhill. A chance for sprintes to shine, and for the GC men to relax a bit before a hard ITT.

STAGE 13, 09.07.21 - Bedoin/Mont Ventoux (ITT, 22km)
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An ITT to Mount Ventoux, because why not... :) But seriously, Mountain ITT's are always interesting - just remember last year.

STAGE 14, 10.07.21 - Carpenarts/Montpellier (Flat, 159km)
Image
A short and almost pan flat stage.

STAGE 15, 11.07.21 - Montpellier/Carcassonne (Hilly, 211km)
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This one is a bit non-obvious. A bit too hard for sprinters, but might be too easy for punchers.

-----REST DAY-----

STAGE 16, 13.07.21 - Oloron-Sainte-Marie/Bagneres-de-Biggore (Mountain, 195km)
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Another classical Mountain stage with Iconic climbs, featuring Aubisque and Tourmalet, which offers bonus seconds.

STAGE 17, 14.07.21 - Pau/Bagneres-de-Luchon (M.Mountain, 178km)
Image
A standard puncher stage on the French national holiday. As we know that french riders are more combative on 14.July, this one could be interesting.

STAGE 18, 15.07.21 - Bagneres-de-Luchon/Col de la Crouzette (Mountain, 152.5km)
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A slightly lower, but still interesting Pyrenean stage. The race passes the spot, where Casartelli died in 1995.

STAGE 19, 16.07.21 - Foix/Estany d'Engolasters (Mountain, 151km)
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The stage into Andorra, with the highest point of the race and the final bonus seconds.

STAGE 20, 17.07.21 - Ax-les-Thermes/Col de Roque-Jalere (Mountin, 98km)
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Some of these climbs might not be known, but this is still a hard and explosive stage.

STAGE 21, 18.07.21 - Chatou/Paris (Flat, 109km)
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I just kept the original, as it is really not important where the final stage starts, as the real racing only begins in Paris centre.
I hope you like my tour :happy:
Micek_52
Last edited by Micek_52 on 23/07/2021, 12:58, edited 8 times in total.
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Pyrozooka0
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by Pyrozooka0 »

maps/tours/view/19199

My entry. Full presentation coming soon.
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alegard
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by alegard »

TOUR DE FRANCE 2021


maps/tours/view/19133

CHARACTERISTICS

3338 total Km
6 high mountain stages (4 MTF)
3 medium mountain stages (1 MTF)
9 flat stages (1 MTF)
3 individual time trials (65.23 total Km)
55 KOM sprints (9 Hors Catégorie, 11 First Category, 8 Second Category, 11 Third Category, 16 Fourth Category)
9 regions hosting stages: Bretagne, Pays de la Loire, Nouvelle Acquitaine, Centre - Val de Loire, Bourgogne - Franche-Comté, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, Occitanie, Île-de-France
Spoiler!
STAGES

Image

Prologue
Saturday 26th June
Brest, 5.25Km, ITT


Image

My 2021 Tour de France starts with a short individual time trial that will be held in Brest. This stage will give the possibility to specialists to wear the first Yellow Jersey, whereas not ruling out sprinters to take it in the following stages. Moreover, beginning with a time trial should, at least in part, avoid the chaos that usually characterises first stages.

Stage 1
Sunday 27th June
Brest > Guingamp, 210 Km, Flat
D+ 1700 m

Image

The first stage of the Tour will represent the first occasion for sprinters. Nonetheless, the first part of the stage, ridden close to the Channel, could be tricky due to the wind. Moreover, the route not being completely flat could lead us to a not so obvious epilogue.

Stage 2
Monday 28th June
Saint-Brieuc > Plouay, 174 Km, Flat
D+ 2100 m

Image

This stage is open to many possible scenarios: however its final kms call for an action by a small group or by a finisseur. The stage takes inspiration from the Bretagne Classic Ouest-France finish, with the addition of some côtes in the central part.

Stage 3
Tuesday 29th June
Vannes > Les Epesses (Puy du Fou), 216 Km, Flat
D+ 1100 m

Image

Uphill finish next to the theme park Puy du Fou in Les Epesses: ideal for another change on top of the GC. Riders will also climb Mont des Alouettes, which hosted the finish of the 2011 first stage.

Stage 4
Wednesday 30th June
Bressuire > Issoudun, 212 Km, Flat
D+ 1300 m

Image

Relatively easy stage, which will likely end in a mass sprint.

Stage 5
Thursday 1st July
Bourges > Autun, 210 Km, Medium Mountain
D+ 3100 m

Image

First medium mountain stage, it looks perfect for a successful breakaway.

Stage 6
Friday 2nd July
Autun > Thiers, 214 Km, Medium Mountain
D+ 2,600 m

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Second medium mountain stage in a row. The tortuous uphill finish in Thiers could be tricky for some GC riders

Stage 7
Saturday 3rd July
Thiers > Lyon, 150 Km, Flat
D+ 1500 m

Image

Another occasion for sprinters before the peloton approaches the Alps

Stage 8
Sunday 4th July
Bourgoin-Jallieu > La Toussuire-Les Sybelles, 193.7 Km, High Mountain (MTF)
D+ 4400 m

Image

The Alps make their debuts in this Tour de France and with them La Toussuire comes back as a stage finish after 6 years. The final climb is preceded by Col du Glandon and by the striking Lacets de Montvernier, which could be ideal for an ambush right before the last ascent. GC will likely have its first real shake at the end of this stage.


Stage 9
Monday 5th July
Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne > Val d'Isère, 186.6 Km, High Mountain
D+5000 m

Image

After the neutralized stage of 2019 edition, TdF comes back on top of Col de l'Iseran. Riders will also have to descend down to the finish in Val d'Isère.

REST DAY
Tuesday 6th July


Stage 10
Wednesday 7th July
Guillestre > Auron (Saint-Étienne-de-Tinée), 100.3 Km, High Mountain (MTF)
D+ 3200 m

Image

After the rest day here is a short but terrible stage. The peloton will have to climb Col de Vars and the fearsome Cime de la Bonette, which is also Souvenir Henri Desgrange of this edition, before reaching Auron, a rather easy climb that could nevertheless be fatal for some riders after the hardships they have been facing during the previous kms.

Stage 11
Thursday 8th July
Nice > Marseille, 210 Km, Flat
D+ 1800 m

Image

After some days in the mountains, the riders will face a seaside stage on the wonderful French Riviera, likely ending with a mass sprint in the streets of Marseille

Stage 12
Friday 9th July
Marseille > Carpentras, 162.2 Km, Flat
D+ 1800 m

Image

Stage starting from Stade Vélodrome in Marseille. This is another occasion for sprinters in the middle of Provence. The last 5 kms of the stage are slightly uphill, but not enough to ruin the expectations of fast wheels.

Stage 13
Saturday 10th July
Caromb > Mont Ventoux, 29.8 Km, ITT
D+ 1700 m

Image

Definitely the most feared stage of the second week: here is the Giant of Provence. Before the actual climb will start, however, the riders will face around 10 flat kms, in which the specialists could gain some time on climbers.

Stage 15
Sunday 11th July
Orange > Le Vigan, 169 Km, Medium Mountain
D+ 2900 m

Image

Not a relaxing day at all after Ventoux. The flat meters will be very few and the riders will have to be careful not to take their toll on the efforts of the previous stage.



Stage 15
Monday 12th July
Montpellier > Limoux, 182 Km, Flat
D+ 1200 m

Image

Last occasion for the sprinters before the Pyrenees.

REST DAY
Tuesday 13th July


Stage 16
Wednesday 14th July
Limoux > Plateau de Beille, 137 Km, High Mountain (MTF)
D+ 4100 m

Image

Bastille Day and probably a worthy winner. First day on the Pyrenees and Plateu de Beille comes back as a finish after 6 years.

Stage 17
Thursday 15th July
Foix > Saint-GIrons, 160.6 Km, High Mountain
D+ 3800 m

Image

A very nervous stage, a lot of up-and-downs and many turns and hairpins. The peloton will climb Col de Peguère under three different versions. Before the finish, the riders will face Le Coch, a 1 km 9.5% climb.

Stage 18
Friday 16th July
Saint-Gaudens > Col d'Aubisque, 230 Km, High Mountain (MTF)
D+ 6000 m

Image

The final mountain stage of the Tour and the Queen Stage, not much to add.

Stage 19
Saturday 17th July
Lourdes > Tarbes, 30 Km, ITT
D+ 150 m

Image

Last possibility to win the 108th Tour de France. An ITT for real specialists: the finals kms in Tarbes require also a good ability in riding the bike.

Stage 20
Sunday 18th July
Sceaux Anthony > Paris (Champs-Élysées), 153 Km, Flat
D+ 1400 m

Image

Repetition of 2006's last stage.
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Anderson
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by Anderson »

Hey!

This is my proposal for the Tour de France 2021 Contest.

Some key facts about my route:
• 6 new finish locations: Paimpol, Douarnenez, Sancerre, Mont Serein, Lacaune, Arreau
• 3.386,5 kilometres, over 53.500 denivel meters
• 2 individual time trials (Stage 1 and 16)
• 4 mountain top finishes (6, 9, 18, 20), 4 downhill finishes (8, 12, 15, 19)
• 8 regions: Bretagne, Pays de la Loire, Centre-Val de Loire, Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur, Occitanie, Île-de-France

Some points and ideas which were very important in creating this route (also the basis for my voting):
• Most important: SAFETY (this year's Tour was horrible in this regard (especially Pontivy stage), the aim is to prevent this kind of situations)
• GC and stage wins should not be decided by crashes in narrow streets and descents
• Short transfers between stage start and finish host cities, practicability / feasibility of the finish venues
• Going on new, interesting and rarely used areas and roads
• Creating a Tour where it is tense up to the last day, so no easy stages during the course, riders have to stay careful all the time
• Visiting beautiful places and areas (the Tour is a 3-week advertisement for French tourism and culture)

Link to the route: maps/tours/view/19085
Spoiler!

Map of the route (thanks to Fyr3 for the instructions):
Image


Stage 1 – Brest > Brest
For the first time since 2017, the Tour starts with an Individual Time Trial. It will be a technical course with two hills (in the middle and at the end).
The peloton will become structured to reduce the nervousness in the next stages. There will only be minor gaps, but good bike controlers will certainly have their advantage.
Image


Stage 2 – Brest > Paimpol
This stage will go to the sprinters. The route goes along the coast in Finistère and Côtes-d'Armor, as well as the gorgeous Côte de Granit Rose.
Some minor hills in the middle part will decide the KOM jersey, but there is barely a chance for a breakaway today.
Image


Stage 3 – Morlaix > Douarnenez
An hommage to the hilly region of Bretagne. The stage is reminiscent of Liège-Bastogne-Liège with a total of 10 KOMs and the first bonus sprint at Côte de Kerlaz 8 km to go.
There is a genuine possibility that all 4 jerseys change their owner, so it will certainly be a nervous day for the riders, but the viewers can enjoy nice landscapes at the Monts d'Arrée and Ménez Hom.
Image


Stage 4 – Concarneau > Rennes
The fourth stage at Breton grounds will be the longest stage in this edition, many cities (Quimper, Lorient, Vannes) and iconic places (Carnac, Golfe du Morbihan) will be visited.
In the end it will be a flat sprint in the Breton capital of Rennes which didn't host a stage finish since 2006.
Image


Stage 5 – Châteaubriant > Tours
Another flat stage, but it could be the last chance for the sprinters in the 1st week. We visit the Val de Loire with many beautiful castles.
The finish line is located at a wide and long alley close to the finish line of Paris-Tours.
Image


Stage 6 – Château de Chambord > Sancerre
This stage starts at one of the most beautiful buildings in France. You could compare the stage to the Épernay stage in 2019, as we go through the middle of the vineyards of Loire and Cher.
In the end, it will be even harder as back then, because we have longer ascents, a bonus sprint at steep Côte de l'Orme au Loup and the first hilltop finish in this edition. The GC will definitely change.
Image


Stage 7 – Nevers > Mâcon
Similar to the real 7th stage, we go beyond the 200km mark from Loire to Saône to reach the first Cat.2 mountains of the edition.
We could see the first successful breakaway, because there are many KOM points and a prestigious victory to take. The final is dedicated to the Mâconnais and Beaujolais wine regions.
Image


Stage 8 – Bourg-en-Bresse > Morzine
Two mountain ranges (Jura and Alps) form the first high mountain stage. A brutal start with Cat.1 Col du Berthiand will break the peloton yery early, only to become more shattered on the extremely steep Mont Salève.
The final will be decided on the slopes of Col de la Ramaz and the descent over Les Gets to the town of Morzine.
Image


Stage 9 – Megève > Col du Galibier
The queen stage of the 1st week features a never-seen-before MTF on the north side of Col du Galibier, where the winner will receive the Souvenir Henri Desgranges. More than 2000m of climbing with Col du Télégraphe and a bonus sprint.
But before that the riders will need to tackle Col de la Madeleine and a variant of La Toussuire. The Tour camp with team buses, technical facilities etc. will be located on Col du Lautaret (8km down on Galibier).
Image


Rest Day - Isère


Stage 10 – Grenoble > Gap
After the rest day, there will be a short and nervous course with many possibilities. The stage win could go to strong sprinters or an breakaway, even a brave attack on the descent (safe side) on Col de Manse could be successful.
Image


Stage 11 – Gap > Montélimar
On paper, this looks like a clear bunch sprint at the end. But the hilly start could worry some sprinters as well as two minor hills 12 and 5 km before the finish line. Most of the stage happens in the rough nature of Vallée de Drôme.
Image


Stage 12 – Valréas > Station du Mont Serein
Originally, I planned this stage to finish in Sault, but the rules said there needs to be the Bédoin variant included, so this stage now features both sides of the Géant de Provence.
The flat part in Vaucluse happens on narrow and nervous roads, then the 1st ascent via Malaucène and the downhill over Sault to Bédoin where we will see the classic ascent via Chalet Reynard.
The finish line is located at the Station du Mont Serein, 7km down on the summit with a bonus sprint. I hope that this version will animate the riders to attack earlier and to take some risks in the short descent.
Image


Stage 13 – Avignon > Béziers
The flattest stage in this edition could turn out to be the most chaotic one.After the start in historic Avignon and a passage through the open lands of Camargue, there is an intermediate sprint at 40km to go.
Riders will certainly try to attack in the chaos afterwards on a straight and open road to open up wind echelons. The finish line in Béziers is on top of a small hill (last km at 4 to 5 %).
Image


Stage 14 – Béziers > Lacaune
A medium mountain stage through the Parc naturel du Haute Languedoc will likely see a successful breakaway, but the steep Pic du Montalet is suitable for an attack of the GC riders. Lacaune has never hosted a stage finish in TDF before.
Image


Stage 15 – Castres > Mazamet
The tour enters (almost) new territory with a hard stage in the Montagne Noire. Only the start is flat, followed by climbing and descending all the time. The descent to Mazamet invites riders to attack at Pic de Nore to gain valuable seconds.
Image


Rest Day - Occitanie


Stage 16 – Carcassonne > Carcassonne
The 2nd ITT happens after the 2nd rest day. It is a slightly hilly course which starts at the town center.
The finish is located right at the entry port of Cité de Carcassonne.This is the only chance for TT specialists to gain important time on the climbers.
Image


Stage 17 – Perpignan > Foix
An open stage many possibilites, but the most likely outcome is a big breakaway. Strong sprinters like Colbrelli, Van Aert and Matthews could survive the mountains with nearly 2000m altitude to win the stage and snatch the green jersey.
Image


Stage 18 – Pamiers > Guzet-Neige - Prat Mataou
A very long mountain stage with over 200km awaits the peloton. 3 hard climbs in the final 40km offer grounds for big attacks.
The last finish in Prat Mataou happened in 1995 (Pantani won) and seems to be quite popular in this contest.
Image


Stage 19 – Saint-Girons > Arreau
Yet again the stage goes up and down, but it will be easier than yesterday. The ascent of Portet-d'Aspet and Peyragudes will decimate the field, and the narrow Hourquette d'Ancizan and the descent from Col d'Aspin favours strong riders.
Arreau has never hosted a stage finish before, but it will see a worth winner on the finish line.
Image


Stage 20 – Bagnères-de-Bigorre > Hautacam
This will be a brutal stage for everyone. Tourmalet for starters, Col des Bordères, Col du Soulor and new Col de Spandelles to make everyone tired and finally the hardest MTF in this edition at Hautacam. This year we go beyond the standard finish up to Col de Tramassel, which makes the ascent even harder. All jerseys could change their owner today, as there is a short time limit and many KOM points on the route.
Last year I criticized some competitors which used Spandelles, I have to apologize for this. In general the east side is usable for a descent, but might need a resurface or a wider road.
Image


Stage 21 – Fontainebleau > Paris Champs-Élysées
The standard parade to Paris, we pass Jardin du Luxembourg, the damaged Notre-Dame cathedral and Musée du Louvre before the well-known Champs-Élysées laps determine the final winner(s).
Image
--------------------------------------------
3rd place Tour de France Contest 2020
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Fyr3
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by Fyr3 »

The way I will rank contests

Hi all, I have already submitted my route presentation however I will quickly post here my criteria for when voting starts, so that you can all know what to expect from me. I will post this again when voting starts before I submit my final vote:

Transfers
-My ranking will be split into two parts and will take into account both the total transfer distance (excluding Paris) and the longest transfer (excluding paris.)
-I will also penalise if a transfer to Paris is not realistic (no TGV or flight back in reasonable time.)
-My main reference for total distance will be the UCI guidelines (2000km or less)
-I will also take into account the length / type of stage before and after a transfer (a longer one is acceptable in the case of a short road stage or time trial afterwards.)
-For transfer times I will use this website: https://www.oalley.fr/

UCI race regulations
-No more than 2 stages of 240km or more in length
-Time trials of no more than 60km in length
-Any circuit must be at least 15km in length
-Total distance must be less than 3500km
-Caravan must be able to pass the route (or at least the majority)

Finishes
-Final straight should be at least 200m for road stages.
-There should be enough room close to the finish line for important areas to be hosted such as the race podium and doping control checks.
-If there is not sufficient space at a finish, there must be relatively easy access to other important areas after the finish (e.g. the ability to descend Col du Portet and Superbagneres by cable car.)
-Road furniture to be kept to a minimum (items such as Bollards and potentially speed humps can be removed)
-There should be access for team cars and neutral service up any final climb to help the riders in the case of mechanicals.
-There should be a deviation for vehicles not crossing the finish line, in particular for stages ending on the flat.
-I will award each finish location a scale of 1 - 5, with a ranking of 5 meaning a finish area has all the capabilities of hosting a stage (Money for hosting the stage provided for instance by a nearby town or resort, area of significance (so not a random dead end) and so forth.) A ranking of 1 basically means I don't see any plausibility of a stage occuring there.

Route Climbs
-A range between 50 - 80 is preferable.
-A range of 5-8 HC climbs is preferable.
-Climbs should be accessible by the team cars and race organisers, and shouldn't have any problems such as long unlit tunnels or large sections of gravel.
-Any gravel climb (or for that matter sector) must either be one already used by pro races (e.g. on Paris Tours or in the case of Cobbles Roubaix) or must be accompanied by a screenshot showing feasibility.
-I will be harsh on any inclusions like the Parpaillon or Jandri.
-As specified in the contest they should not be important points on last year's route (I am however inclined against judgement for inclusion of Peyragudes or Peyresourde given it features on the actual route this year.)

Contest Rules
-All rules must of course have been adhered to.

Personal criteria
-At least 50km of time trialing because the Giro was targeted at the Climbers this year.
-At least 1 stage that features some kind of memorial or memory of a rider or famous moment in the race's history (Mourenx having crowned Eddy Merckx, passage beside the memorial to Fabio Casartelli, etc.)
-At least one new climb and new finish and new start town on the route (On my route that would be Domène as a start town, the Circuit de Charade as a finish, and the Col d'Ayen on stage 13.)
-At least one major French landmark / tourism attraction or historical site visited / passed by the Tour excluding Paris (in my case this would be the Passage du Gois, other examples might be the Notre Dame de la Garde in Marseille or a place like Futuroscope.
-At least one summit finish that isn't HC.
-At least one medium mountain stage that can shape the GC (e.g Mende.)
-A novelty on the route, this could be unpaved roads like Ribinou, or a never crossed region like the Verdon Gorges, or a stage with unique design like the Col du Portet stage in 2018.
-A healthy balance between climbers and all-rounders, this might for instance be 5-7 mountain stages and 1-2 time trials (3 if shorter length) and a mix of MTFs and descent finishes.
-Practicability in case of emergencies (E.g being able to move a finish if there is a landslide that takes out a bridge on a road before a stage, or being able to re-route in the case of seismic activity (in particular I think of the Col de Larche here.) I will be quite reasonable on this given the disaster at Tignes.
-Safety protocols such as avoiding unnecessary roads if they could be narrow / technical (this is in the UCI book however I want to be more lenient as if Tour designers are making these mistakes then what am I expecting of us?!)
-And finally, there must be at least one climb Chris Froome went over first on in the past.




psst don't worry the last one is a joke :D
"Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving." - Albert Einstein
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Jekp
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Re: Contest #6 - Tour de France 2021

Post by Jekp »

My 2021 route: maps/tours/view/19151
Key figures of the route
Total distance 3295km, 59.4km of individual time trial
7 flat stages, 6 hilly stages and 6 High Mountain stages
4 Mountain top Finishes and 3 hill top finishes
74 KOM sprints, 10 HC climbs
Regions visited 10: Bretagne, Pays de la Loire, Nouvelle Aquitaine, Centre val de Loire, Auvergne-Rhone-alps, Provence-alps-Cote d`Azur, Occitanie, Normandie, Ile de France
Spoiler!
Saturday 26/06
Stage 1: Brest > Crozon 199km
The first stage is an open stage, the sprinters will have to fight hard to controll the race as the terrain is undulating
Image

Sunday 27/06
Stage 2: Douarnenez > Carhaix-Plouger 175km
A flat stage with lots of short climbs in the last 25km
Image

Monday 28/06
Stage 3: Guingcamp > Mur de Bretagne 157km
The Yellow jersey will probably change shoulders today with 3 ascents of the mür de Bretagne.
Image

Tuesday: 29/06
Stage 4: Ploermel > Angers 178km
A flat stage with no particular difficulties, taking the riders east out of the Bretagne region.
Image

Wednesday 30/06
Stage 5: Chinon > La Souterraine 194km
Another flat stage, a little harder than the previous with uphill false flat for most of the second half of the stage
Image

Thursday 01/07
Stage 6: Gueret > Saint-Vaury 34.5km itt
First test for the GC and the longest of the two time trials in this Tour. The route between Gueret and Saint Vaury is hilly.
Image

Friday 02/07
Stage 7: Aubusson > Mont Dore (Sancy) 222km
The longest stage of this Tour, and the hardest stage so far in the race. With two 2nd category climbs and several easier climbs.
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Saturday 03/07
Stage 8: Issoire > Yssingeaux 158.5km
To hard for the sprinters, but to easy to create gaps in the GC, Maybe a stage for the Breakaway.
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Sunday 04/07
Stage 9: Annonay > Chambery 209km
The first 110km are mostly flat but from there and out the final 100km are brutal. Two times up to Col de l`Epine and the steep climb to Mont du Chat inbetween the Ascents before descending to Chambery.
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Monday 05/07 restday

Tuesday 06/07
Stage 10: Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne > Col de Granon 155km
Queen stage of the alps with three HC climbs. Just 10km from the start the rider will face the Col de la Croix fer climb, than passing over Col du Galibier via Col du Telegraphe. Before the final Ascent up col de Granon 11.8km à 8,9%.
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Wednesday 07/07
Stage 11: Embrun > Manosque 164km
Stage 11 can see the Breakaway go all the way, the stage is probably to hard in the beginning for the pure sprinters, with 3 categorised climbs in the first 60km. After that it is mainly downhill except a 7,7km climb 40km from the finishline.
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Thursday 08/07
Stage 12: Manosque > Sault 157km
This stage should suit the best puncheurs in the peloton. But it will be a reduced peloton that enter the final. The 1st category climb in the middle of the stage will peel of many riders if the pace is high enough. After the 1st category the route is easy until the steep Mur de Monieux. After the catgorised climb the road continous to rise for another 5km before a fast descent down to Villes-sur-Auzon. From there it is 20km of uphill false flat before the final start with a new ascent of the Mur de Monieux before an uphill finish to Sault.
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Friday 09/07
Stage 13: Malaucene > Malaucene 153km
The rider wont be looking forward to this stage with to passages of the Mount Ventoux. First from the South, up from Sault than up from Bedoin before descending to the finish in Malaucene.
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Saturday 10/07
Stage 14: Avignon > Agde 173.5km
A day for the Sprinters, the only difficulties should be the Wind in from the ocean that can create Bordeurs, and the Mont Saint-Clair climb 30 km before the finish. most likely to far from the finish to cause issues for the sprinters.
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Sunday 11/07
Stage 15: Narbonne > Camurac (Ski station de Camurac) 188km
Last day before the second Restday. The first 2/3 of the stage are not to hard, the last on the other hand invites the riders to go on the offensive. If someone wants to take time in the GC they should attack early as the last climb is just 5,2km long.
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Monday 12/07 RESTDAY

Tuesday 13/07
Stage 16: Ax-les-Thermes > Arinsal 153.5km
First high mountain stage in the Pyrenees. Most of the stage takes place in Andorra finishing at the Arinsal ski resort for the first time in a Grand Tour.
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Wednesday 14/07
Stage 17: La Massana > Guzet Neige 154.5km
The Stage starts in Andorra, but quicky makes its way to France passing to 1st category climbs on the way, from there the route is easy until it remains 45km. Fist the Port de Lers and Col de Agnes, before the final taht consists of Col de Latrappe and the final Climb to Guzet Neige, both with an average of 7,5%.
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Thursday 15/07
Stage 18: Saint-Girons > Bagneres de Bigorre 162.5km
A stage packed with short climbs that will be difficult to control and attacks will be many.
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Friday 16/07
Stage 19: Lourdes > Lourdes 24.5km itt
The second time trial is a little shorter and easier than the first, but still nowhere near flat.
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Saturday 17/07
Stage 20: Argeles-Gazost > Col du Tourmalet 145km
A Monstrous hard final mountain stage, with Luz Ardiden, Col du Tourmalet x2, Col de Aspin and the Hourquette d`Ancizan climb all within less than 145km. Riders that have lost much time earlier in the Tour could go on an early attack to try and win back the lost time.
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Sunday 18/07
Stage 21: Gisors > Paris (Champs Elysees) 134km
Final stage to Paris, with the standard circuit on Champs Elysees.
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