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Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup [Cat. 2]

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Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup [Cat. 2]

Post by emmea90 »

Image
Thanks to David Lappartient, UCI decided to introduced the Road World Cup back in a new format.

The Road World Cup will be a new end-season classic, around the world, of the duration of three months from November to January, in the same dates of the cyclocross season. Prize money, excitement and grant from Lappartient that would not be able to ride Worlds and Olympics otherwise made the riders declared excited to compete in the new competiton and wanting to fight for it.

What you will have to do is so to draw 10 classics meeting this requirements
- The classics are city-located (example: Round 1, Beijing) and they shall start and finish in the same city
- Circuits are not mandatory, but there should be extra passages on the finish line
- The 10-classic series shall have at least one race in North America, one race in South America and one race in Asia
- The series shall be done balanced in a way that allows different type of riders to compete for the GC (Gilbert, Viviani, Ackermann, Valverde, Alaphilippe, Roglic, Bernal, Quintana, Pogacar, Evenepoel etc), prizing the one with the most complete characteristics
- You have to define also the rules (use tour description)
- You have to consider the time period (so for example, you can't do a "stelvio classic" due to snow)
- No time trials classics
- Length of each classic shall be from 250 to 290 km.

Deadline is may 31, h 23.59
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emilio.torre
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by emilio.torre »

benoît.guillot wrote:
07/05/2020, 13:41
emilio.torre wrote:
07/05/2020, 12:52
maps/tours/view/14788 - UCI Road World Cup - 5 hill classics, 3 sprinters and climbers classics, the calendar follows the Formula One World Championship calendar format : OCEANIA, ASIA AND AFRICA(February and March); EUROPE (From May to August); NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN AMERICA (September)

maps/viewtrack/346033 - BATHRUST, AUSTRALIA
The first round of UCI Road World Cup it's on the town of Bathrust, in Australia, the hill circuit include the famous climb of Mount Panorama short but terrible, that race is for finisseurs and Ardennes classics specialists

maps/viewtrack/346021 - HONG KONG, CHINA
The second round it's on the city of Hong Kong, a very hard circuit which include the Bowen Hill's climb from the hardest part, a race for climbers and mountain specialists

maps/viewtrack/346012 - PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA
After a week of rest, World Cup returns at Pretoria in South Africa, a circuit for sprinters and mid-flat classics specialists, the unique climb is Bryntirion on the presidential park but it's not very hard.

maps/viewtrack/346414 - BUCURESTI, ROMANIA
After a 50-day rest, World Cup comes in Eastern Europe with another flat race on the Romania's capital Bucuresti, the sprinters can be fight for the victory from first to last km.

maps/viewtrack/346106 - GAP, FRANCE
The week after Bucuresti it's time for Ardennes classics specialists to fight on the Gap's circuit based on 1972 World Championships track, that include the Cote de Chateauvieux; a pedaled climb with hard climb points.

maps/viewtrack/346113 - BARNOLDSWICK, UK
The World Cup comes back in the end of July with a round on flat track of Barnoldswick on the Lancashire county in the UK, that round is not very hard but a rainy day, typical of Lancashire, can be make a great show, the little rips are not very dangerous for sprinters.

maps/viewtrack/346418 - RONSE \ RENAIX, BELGIUM
The seventh round of World Cup is very tough with the 1988's World Champioships track which include a Tour of Flanders tarmac climb of Kruisberg, the Flanders specialists can be fight here, attention to finisseur or atypical sprinters.

maps/viewtrack/346406 - PIAN DI CANSIGLIO, ITALY
The last european round of World Cup rides on the Veneto's climb around Vittorio Veneto's town, Passo Crosetta and Valico San Lorenzo are very tough, the climbers can be fight on his land.

maps/viewtrack/346004 - COLORADO SPRINGS, USA
The american World Cup's round starts from Colorado Springs with the 1986 World Championships ride, with the very hard rips and short climbs where Ardennes specialist and medium climbers can be make the difference.

maps/viewtrack/346008 - RIO DE JANEIRO, BRASIL
The last round of UCI Road World Cup is on the city of Rio de Janeiro, the ride is similar to 2016 Olympic Games road cycling ride with the five climbs of Grumari, Grota Fonda,Mansao sao Corrao,Canoas and Vista Chinesa, the final is flat but the ride is for climbers and mountain specialists.
Same as me. You don't understand the rules. Rules says that every races should take place between november and january.

Sorry, your work is fine, really.


Please ! That rule is stupid ! No cyclists would want to continue thei season between november and january ! Even if the weather is good in other countries or continent, they all use winter as recover ! Can we please change that rule?
Thanks Benoit! Calendar form rule can be substituted by another rule which program that races on arch from February to September, from November to January is right for only cyclo-cross and track cycling. If there was a world cup on the road, the cyclocross and track world cups would be overshadowed

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benoît.guillot
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by benoît.guillot »

emilio.torre wrote:
07/05/2020, 23:18
benoît.guillot wrote:
07/05/2020, 13:41
emilio.torre wrote:
07/05/2020, 12:52
maps/tours/view/14788 - UCI Road World Cup - 5 hill classics, 3 sprinters and climbers classics, the calendar follows the Formula One World Championship calendar format : OCEANIA, ASIA AND AFRICA(February and March); EUROPE (From May to August); NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN AMERICA (September)

maps/viewtrack/346033 - BATHRUST, AUSTRALIA
The first round of UCI Road World Cup it's on the town of Bathrust, in Australia, the hill circuit include the famous climb of Mount Panorama short but terrible, that race is for finisseurs and Ardennes classics specialists

maps/viewtrack/346021 - HONG KONG, CHINA
The second round it's on the city of Hong Kong, a very hard circuit which include the Bowen Hill's climb from the hardest part, a race for climbers and mountain specialists

maps/viewtrack/346012 - PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA
After a week of rest, World Cup returns at Pretoria in South Africa, a circuit for sprinters and mid-flat classics specialists, the unique climb is Bryntirion on the presidential park but it's not very hard.

maps/viewtrack/346414 - BUCURESTI, ROMANIA
After a 50-day rest, World Cup comes in Eastern Europe with another flat race on the Romania's capital Bucuresti, the sprinters can be fight for the victory from first to last km.

maps/viewtrack/346106 - GAP, FRANCE
The week after Bucuresti it's time for Ardennes classics specialists to fight on the Gap's circuit based on 1972 World Championships track, that include the Cote de Chateauvieux; a pedaled climb with hard climb points.

maps/viewtrack/346113 - BARNOLDSWICK, UK
The World Cup comes back in the end of July with a round on flat track of Barnoldswick on the Lancashire county in the UK, that round is not very hard but a rainy day, typical of Lancashire, can be make a great show, the little rips are not very dangerous for sprinters.

maps/viewtrack/346418 - RONSE \ RENAIX, BELGIUM
The seventh round of World Cup is very tough with the 1988's World Champioships track which include a Tour of Flanders tarmac climb of Kruisberg, the Flanders specialists can be fight here, attention to finisseur or atypical sprinters.

maps/viewtrack/346406 - PIAN DI CANSIGLIO, ITALY
The last european round of World Cup rides on the Veneto's climb around Vittorio Veneto's town, Passo Crosetta and Valico San Lorenzo are very tough, the climbers can be fight on his land.

maps/viewtrack/346004 - COLORADO SPRINGS, USA
The american World Cup's round starts from Colorado Springs with the 1986 World Championships ride, with the very hard rips and short climbs where Ardennes specialist and medium climbers can be make the difference.

maps/viewtrack/346008 - RIO DE JANEIRO, BRASIL
The last round of UCI Road World Cup is on the city of Rio de Janeiro, the ride is similar to 2016 Olympic Games road cycling ride with the five climbs of Grumari, Grota Fonda,Mansao sao Corrao,Canoas and Vista Chinesa, the final is flat but the ride is for climbers and mountain specialists.
Same as me. You don't understand the rules. Rules says that every races should take place between november and january.

Sorry, your work is fine, really.


Please ! That rule is stupid ! No cyclists would want to continue thei season between november and january ! Even if the weather is good in other countries or continent, they all use winter as recover ! Can we please change that rule?
Thanks Benoit! Calendar form rule can be substituted by another rule which program that races on arch from February to September, from November to January is right for only cyclo-cross and track cycling. If there was a world cup on the road, the cyclocross and track world cups would be overshadowed
Cannot be more agree ! So that november-january rule... not a good idea

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JAdmeal
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by JAdmeal »

benoît.guillot wrote:
08/05/2020, 0:43
emilio.torre wrote:
07/05/2020, 23:18
benoît.guillot wrote:
07/05/2020, 13:41


Same as me. You don't understand the rules. Rules says that every races should take place between november and january.

Sorry, your work is fine, really.


Please ! That rule is stupid ! No cyclists would want to continue thei season between november and january ! Even if the weather is good in other countries or continent, they all use winter as recover ! Can we please change that rule?
Thanks Benoit! Calendar form rule can be substituted by another rule which program that races on arch from February to September, from November to January is right for only cyclo-cross and track cycling. If there was a world cup on the road, the cyclocross and track world cups would be overshadowed
Cannot be more agree ! So that november-january rule... not a good idea
I think it's a good idea because this is the UCI response to the coronavirus outbreak. Lots of races had been postponed and in order to not overcrowd the cycling calendar, they decided to extent the current calendar to January. It's not the best idea because of the cold weather but this is a challenge. You'll have to search for cities with a warm weather to do the races.

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benoît.guillot
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by benoît.guillot »

JAdmeal wrote:
08/05/2020, 10:27
benoît.guillot wrote:
08/05/2020, 0:43
emilio.torre wrote:
07/05/2020, 23:18

Thanks Benoit! Calendar form rule can be substituted by another rule which program that races on arch from February to September, from November to January is right for only cyclo-cross and track cycling. If there was a world cup on the road, the cyclocross and track world cups would be overshadowed
Cannot be more agree ! So that november-january rule... not a good idea
I think it's a good idea because this is the UCI response to the coronavirus outbreak. Lots of races had been postponed and in order to not overcrowd the cycling calendar, they decided to extent the current calendar to January. It's not the best idea because of the cold weather but this is a challenge. You'll have to search for cities with a warm weather to do the races.
Come on ! Even the revisited calendar (which btw is a joker but let's say they did not have other choice) stop in november to let riders rest 2 months before the new season.

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mauro
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by mauro »

UCI ESOTIC WORLD CUP

maps/tours/view/14794

Ho pensato di escludere totalmente l’Europa da queste competizioni, in modo da portare la corsa in terre “esotiche” dell’emisfero australe, dove tra ottobre e gennaio la stagione è buona e consente di gareggiare in alta quota (per esempio, la città di Quito si trova a 2850 metri d’altezze e nel mese di gennaio presenta normalmente temperature comprese tra 9° e 19°). La gara più settentrionale è quella di Tunisi

I thought to totally exclude Europe from these competitions, in order to bring the race to "exotic" lands of the southern hemisphere, where between October and January the season is good and allows you to compete at high altitude (for example, the city of Quito is located at 2850 meters above sea level and in January it normally has temperatures between 9° and 19°C). The northernmost race is that of Tunis


1) La partecipazione è obbligatoria per le prime 15 squadre classificate nell’UCI World Tour della stagione precedente. I corridori, invece, non sono obbligati a partecipare a tutte le competizioni.

1) Participation is mandatory for the top 15 teams ranked in the previous season's UCI World Tour. The runners, on the other hand, are not obliged to participate in all competitions.

2) È prevista una classifica generale unicamente a squadre che viene calcolata sommando I tempi di tutti I partecipanti

2) There is a general classification only for teams which is calculated by adding up the times of participants

3) È prevista anche una maglia di leader dell’UCI Esotic World Cup. A indossarla è il corridore della squadra in testa alla classifica che nelle gare precedenti ha conquistato il maggior numero di punti (conteggiando il piazzamento nell’ordine d’arrivo e i passaggi agli sprint intermedi e ai GPM)

3) A UCI Esotic World Cup leader's jersey is also provided. It is worn by the rider of the team at the top of the standings who scored the most points in previous races (counting the placement in the order of arrival and the passes to the intermediate sprints and GPM)

4) La maglia di leader dei GPM viene assegnata con un metodo simile: c’è una classifica a squadre stabilita dal numero complessivo di punti conquistati e poi a vestire la maglia è il corridore di quella squadra che ne ha accumulati di più

4) The GPM leader's jersey is assigned with a similar method: there is a team ranking established by the overall number of points scored and then the rider of that team who has accumulated the most to wear the jersey

5) Stesso discorso per la classifica degli sprint intermedi

5) Same goes for the intermediate sprint classification

JERSEY

La maglia di leader dell’UCI Esotic World Cup è di colore bianco, caratterizzata da una riga rossa che gira attorno al busto e che rappresenta la linea dell’equatore. È, inoltre, riportata la scritta “UCI Esotic World Cup” e una riproduzione del volto di Ferdinando Magellano, il navigatore portoghese che intraprese la prima circumnavigazione del globo terrestre. La maglia è realizzata dalla casa di moda Versace. Nella gara conclusiva di Miami Beach è, infatti, previsto il passaggio davanti a Casa Casuarina, che fu la villa di Gianni Versace (oggi è un hotel di lusso)

The UCI Esotic World Cup leader shirt is white in color, characterized by a red line that runs around the torso and represents the equator line. It is also reported the inscription "UCI Esotic World Cup" and a reproduction of the face of Ferdinando Magellano, the Portuguese navigator who undertook the first circumnavigation of the terrestrial globe. The shirt is made by the Versace fashion house. In fact, in the final race of Miami Beach the passage in front of Casa Casuarina, which was the villa of Gianni Versace (today is a luxury hotel)

GRAND PRIX OF THE INDIES (India)

Image

HONG KONG CYCLE CLASSIC (Hong Kong)

Image

THE ARROW OF PERTH(Australia)

Image

EMIRATES CUP (United Arab Emirates)

Image

LA FLÈCHE DE CARTHAGE (Tunisia)

Image

CABO VERDE CLIMB CUP (Cabo Verde)

Image

GRAND PRIX DO BONAERENSES (Argentina)

Image

CARAPAZ TROPHY (Ecuador)

Image

QUINTANA BROTHERS TROPHY (Colombia – Si transita per tre volta da Cómbita, paese natale dei fratelli Quintana - You pass three times from Cómbita, the birthplace of the Quintana brothers)

Image

MEMORIAL VERSACE (Usa)

Image
Last edited by mauro on 10/05/2020, 18:31, edited 1 time in total.

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AjachiChakrabarti
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by AjachiChakrabarti »

Here's my submission: maps/tours/view/14811

Rules:

1. The UCI World Cup is a competition between national teams. While individual prizes will be awarded for each race, only teams will accumulate points for the overall classification. This will provide national teams more opportunities to work together outside the World Championship, and allow the transfer season to proceed in parallel. I've kept it as a team competition so that riders are not penalised for missing individual rounds.

2. The top 22 teams in the UCI Nations Ranking at the end of the season will qualify for the World Cup. Based on the current rankings, the qualifying teams are Belgium, Italy, France, Colombia, Netherlands, Germany, Slovenia, Australia, Spain, Denmark, Great Britain, Norway, Switzerland, Russia, Austria, Ireland, Kazakhstan, Poland, Ecuador, Slovakia, Canada and Portugal.

3. Any country in the top 100 of the nations ranking at the end of a season may bid to host one of the nine preliminary rounds in the following year's World Cup. Africa, Asia, South America and North America will host two rounds each, while Oceania hosts one round. Since most of the top teams and races are in Europe, this gives an opportunity to promote the sport in the rest of the world.

4. Besides their home race, host nations will be allocated wild cards to two additional rounds of the World Cup. They will select the rounds in random order, following a snake-draft system. In case a host nation qualifies by finishing the season in the top 22, its wild cards will be awarded to the highest-ranked non-host nation. There will thus be 25 national teams participating in each round. South Africa is currently 23rd, but if it moves into the top 22, its wild cards would go to the nation it displaces.

5. Each nation will announce a squad of nine riders, of whom six will participate in a particular round. Teams may make a maximum three substitutions to their squad over the course of the World Cup. A rider substituted out of the squad may not be substituted back in. This is meant to give as much of a level playing field as possible, so that nations with more top riders cannot keep substituting in new guys, while keeping some flexibility in case of injuries.

6. As in the UCI World Championship, race radios will be prohibited in World Cup races.

7. Any rider who is lapped on the circuits will be immediately eliminated. Riders must maintain adequate distance from and not provide assistance to any rider who is about to lap them. This shouldn't be a factor, since most of the circuits are fairly long, but just in case.

8. The top ten finishers in each round will score, respectively, 60, 45, 36, 28, 21, 15, 10, 6, 3, 2 and 1 points for their national teams. The top three in each intermediate sprint will score 3, 2 and 1 points for their teams. The KOM point allocation is as follows:
HC 5, 4, 3, 2, 1
Cat1 4, 3, 2, 1
Cat2 3, 2, 1
Cat3 2, 1
Cat4 1
A rider need not finish the race for their points for intermediate/KOM sprints to count for their national teams.

Most races have an early intermediate sprint, so teams could choose to devote a few riders just for them. This should make it harder for a breakaway to form early on, which makes for more exciting racing.

9. Ties in the overall classification will be resolved in the following order:
(i) Points scored only from race finishes
(ii) A count back of all individual race finishes by members of the tied teams, ordered from best to worst.

So a team with two wins outranks a team with a win and a second place, and so on.

10. The top 15 teams in the overall classification at the end of the nine preliminary rounds will qualify for the final. This provides an incentive for lesser teams to attack in the final races. The top 15 can include wild-card teams, if they have accumulated enough points in their three races.

11. Double points will be awarded for all categories in the final round. The team with the highest overall score at the end of the final will win the World Cup. This achieves a balance between high stakes for the final and rewarding success throughout the World Cup.


ROUND ONE: KIGALI
15 November 2020

maps/viewtrack/346000

The route heads northwest from the Rwandan capital for the first hundred kilometres, followed by a circuit around Musanze, which includes the HC climb to Buhamo (8.4 km @ 9.6%). It then doubles back, following the same road to Kigali, where the race ends with three ascents of Mount Kigali (5.7 km @ 6.8%).

Image


ROUND TWO: CAPE TOWN
22 November 2020

maps/viewtrack/346331

The race consists of nine laps of a city circuit, starting and ending on the waterfront at Mouille Point. The circuit follows Tafelberg Road up and down Table Mountain (6.9 km @ 5.4%, of which the first three kilometres average 8.4%).
[Note: Satellite images suggest that some sections of the descent of Table Mountain are unpaved, but Cycling South Africa has promised to have them paved by race day.]

Image


ROUND THREE: DOHA
29 November 2020

maps/viewtrack/346356

The erstwhile Tour of Qatar used to be a preparatory race for the spring classics because of the frequent crosswinds. This race loops through desert roads for the first two hundred kilometres, before finishing with three laps of a 24 km circuit around Doha Corniche and the diplomatic quarter.

Image


ROUND FOUR: SHIZUOKA
6 December 2020

maps/viewtrack/346317

The race heads up the lower slopes of Mount Fuji before making the long ascent of Mount Yanbushi. The final categorised climb is to Higashifujikawa (7.8 km @ 7.7%), followed by a descent back into Shizuoka and a final 13 km loop through city streets.
[Note: Japan's December temperatures hover in the high single digits, so snow is unlikely. In the event that Yanbushi is snowed out, however, the route would be modified to two ascents of Fuji Sanroku followed by the final climb and three laps of the city circuit.]

Image


ROUND FIVE: CHRISTCHURCH
13 December 2020

maps/viewtrack/346345

This race is characterised by a number of short, steep climbs. It follows the Akaroa Road out of Christchurch before heading back to Governors Bay, where four ascents of Dyers Pass (3 km @ 9.5%) should provide plenty of opportunities to attack.
[Note: I have no idea why Kiwis don't use apostrophes in place names. The unclassified spikes in the race profile are from a tunnel to Lyttelton.]

Image


ROUND SIX: SANTIAGO
10 January 2021

maps/viewtrack/346362

Positioning will be key in this four-lap criterium through the streets of the Chilean capital. Beginning in front of La Moneda, the circuit soon heads into narrow park roads up the climb to Cerro San Cristobal. This is followed by the longer climb to Passeo Pie Andino (10.5 km @ 5.5%, with sections in excess of eight percent) and a twisty run to the finish.
[Note: Unclassified spikes are tunnels.]

Image


ROUND SEVEN: CARACAS
17 January 2021

maps/viewtrack/346377

The race heads out of Caracas and back, with a first-category climb (11.1 km @ 6.5%) soon after the first intermediate sprint. Once it re-enters the Venezuelan capital, the route includes a number of short hills before three laps of a 34 km circuit.

Image


ROUND EIGHT: TIJUANA
24 January 2021

maps/viewtrack/346678

Although none of the climbs in this race are especially threatening, there is enough climbing and potential for echelons over the three big laps and the one small lap around the Mexican border city to make a bunch sprint anything but a guarantee.

Image


ROUND NINE: HAVANA
31 January 2021

maps/viewtrack/346706

The final preliminary round is a mostly flat race in and around the Cuban capital, barring an excursion to the Sierra del Rosario in the second quarter. The race ends with two laps of the Vedado district in downtown Havana.

Image


FINAL: MONACO
14 February 2021

maps/viewtrack/346737

The 15-team rule exists not only to add late-stage drama to the World Cup, but also for safety reasons, as a smaller peloton will help keep things in line on this seven-lap race through the principality's twisty streets. Much of the early thinning of the peloton will take place on the descent of the first of the circuit's two climbs, a seven-kilometre plunge at an average gradient of -5.4% with no less than 17 hairpins, culminating in the iconic Fairmont Hotel hairpin and tunnel from the Monaco GP. This is soon followed by the climb to La Turbie (6.6 km @ 6.9%), which should provide the staging ground for many attacks, with the World Cup on the line.

Image

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AjachiChakrabarti
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by AjachiChakrabarti »

mauro wrote:
08/05/2020, 14:55

GRAND PRIX OF THE INDIES (India)

Image
I'm glad you included a race in my city, but I should warn you that the air quality in Delhi is terrible in November, with the AQI often exceeding 1000. If you want an Indian race, Hyderabad, Pune or Bangalore might be more appropriate cities. They have lower pollution, some nice hills to work with, and the most interest in cycling.

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emmea90
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by emmea90 »

benoît.guillot wrote:
07/05/2020, 20:03
emmea90 wrote:
07/05/2020, 19:22
benoît.guillot wrote:
06/05/2020, 23:26
Should I delete my submission as I give up?
Yes, or edit it
I don't find anyway to delete a message. I'll see if I choose to edit it but honestly. I don't know roads of countries like mexico, africain countries or any other country that can for sure hosting such a classic between november and january.
And this is exactly the point of this contest zizi
Software Engineer, Cycling Fanatic

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sportdani19
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by sportdani19 »

Panama count as North America or South America?

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benoît.guillot
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by benoît.guillot »

emmea90 wrote:
09/05/2020, 12:35
benoît.guillot wrote:
07/05/2020, 20:03
emmea90 wrote:
07/05/2020, 19:22


Yes, or edit it
I don't find anyway to delete a message. I'll see if I choose to edit it but honestly. I don't know roads of countries like mexico, africain countries or any other country that can for sure hosting such a classic between november and january.
And this is exactly the point of this contest zizi
No kidding :lol: :lol: :lol:

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jajoejoe
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by jajoejoe »

sportdani19 wrote:
09/05/2020, 15:01
Panama count as North America or South America?
Panama is North-America. Check the map at the wikipedia link provided
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_America

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mauro
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by mauro »

AjachiChakrabarti wrote:
08/05/2020, 21:40
mauro wrote:
08/05/2020, 14:55

GRAND PRIX OF THE INDIES (India)

Image
I'm glad you included a race in my city, but I should warn you that the air quality in Delhi is terrible in November, with the AQI often exceeding 1000. If you want an Indian race, Hyderabad, Pune or Bangalore might be more appropriate cities. They have lower pollution, some nice hills to work with, and the most interest in cycling.
Accogliendo il suggerimento di AjachiChakrabarti ho modificato il percorso della mia prima gara, spostandola da New Delhi a Bangalore. Inoltre ho reso visibili i tracciati dettagliati delle prove (l’altro giorno mi ero dimenticato di farlo)

Accepting the suggestion of AjachiChakrabarti i modified the route of my first race, moving it from New Delhi to Bangalore. I also made the detailed test tracks visible (the other day i forgot to do it)

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SmokingPuppy841
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by SmokingPuppy841 »

benoît.guillot wrote:
09/05/2020, 15:11


No kidding :lol: :lol: :lol:
One thing to consider about your plans is that - although you're route might not work in the winter - you're only failing on 1 part of the criteria. So you still stand a chance of doing alright in the contest.

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Arnorius
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by Arnorius »

SmokingPuppy841 wrote:
10/05/2020, 19:17
One thing to consider about your plans is that - although you're route might not work in the winter - you're only failing on 1 part of the criteria. So you still stand a chance of doing alright in the contest.
Well see that's what I always hate about the votes. Failing in one part of the criteria is failing in the whole contest in my opnion... ;)

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benoît.guillot
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by benoît.guillot »

SmokingPuppy841 wrote:
10/05/2020, 19:17
benoît.guillot wrote:
09/05/2020, 15:11


No kidding :lol: :lol: :lol:
One thing to consider about your plans is that - although you're route might not work in the winter - you're only failing on 1 part of the criteria. So you still stand a chance of doing alright in the contest.
Yes I think I will try. My point is that I'm not sure of route I choose in "exotic" countries. I don't want to make a course on highway or on dirt road without knowing it...

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davandluz
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by davandluz »

benoît.guillot wrote:
11/05/2020, 14:29
SmokingPuppy841 wrote:
10/05/2020, 19:17
benoît.guillot wrote:
09/05/2020, 15:11


No kidding :lol: :lol: :lol:
One thing to consider about your plans is that - although you're route might not work in the winter - you're only failing on 1 part of the criteria. So you still stand a chance of doing alright in the contest.
Yes I think I will try. My point is that I'm not sure of route I choose in "exotic" countries. I don't want to make a course on highway or on dirt road without knowing it...
There's Google Maps Street View for that

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SmokingPuppy841
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by SmokingPuppy841 »

Arnorius wrote:
10/05/2020, 20:23
SmokingPuppy841 wrote:
10/05/2020, 19:17
One thing to consider about your plans is that - although you're route might not work in the winter - you're only failing on 1 part of the criteria. So you still stand a chance of doing alright in the contest.
Well see that's what I always hate about the votes. Failing in one part of the criteria is failing in the whole contest in my opnion... ;)
I like to use the amount of criteria achieved as 'categories', and then work on the routes. So if 5 or more are on the top category then only they will get a say in which I go for.

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davandluz
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by davandluz »

UCI ROAD WORLD CUP 2020 maps/tours/view/14793

THE RULES

The World Cup concept has been radically transformed: UCI will crown a winning nation, rather than an individual; the world champion will not be a cyclist, but rather a country.
In every stage, every national team manager can choose which riders to call for every stage from a pool of 12 pre-elected riders (plus 2 reserves in case of injuries - once the substitution is made, it cannot be reversed), to be announced the week before the World Cup starts.

The starting line will see the top 25 countries in the UCI Nation Ranking, plus the host countries and highest ranked country for every continent if not in the top 25. If host countries and continental leaders are already qualified, countries in the UCI Nation Ranking sitting below the 25th position will qualify, until the total number of 40 national teams will be reached. The top 20 national teams in the UCI Nation Ranking will be allowed 6 riders per every stage, the latter 20 will be allowed 3 riders per stage. A grand total of 180 riders will start every stage. After the fourth round, the World Cup classification will determine a new top 20/bottom 20, and the number of cyclist allowed per team will change accordingly. UCI Nation Ranking will be considered in case of ties. Car order will follow the provisional general classification, apart from the first stage in which the UCI Nation Ranking will be considered.

After every stage, points will be awarded to the first 10 riders to cross the finish line (100, 50, 30, 20, 15, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2). Points will be given to the country, rather than to the individual cyclist: if a country has more than one riders in the stage top 10, all points will be awarded (therefore, not necessarily 10 countries will get points in every stage, if a single country manages to put more than one riders in the daily top 10). The riders of the first team on the table wear a special jersey with a rainbow stripe.

Last round, double points (200, 100, 60, 40, 30, 16, 12, 8, 4). Only the countries in the top 19 plus the host country qualify for this last stage (if the last stage host country is in the top 19, the 20th team will be admitted). All teams will be able to call up 9 riders.

The national team team with more points after the tenth stage will be crowned world champion. Gold medals will be given to all 12 cyclists (plus the substituted athletes, if that is the case) and to the team manager. All 12 (+2) riders will also have the privilege to add a rainbow stripe on their team jersey on the chest and the back for the rest of the season. Silver and bronze medals to second and third classified countries will also be awarded. In case of ties, stage wins (and, in case these are tied as well, podiums and top 10 finishes) will be the second criterium of classification. The MVC Prize (Most Valuable Cyclist) will also be introduced, and it will go to the cyclist who will obtain the most points along the whole World Cup. He will be given the honor to wear a rainbow on the whole right sleeve in his team jersey for the rest of the season.

World Cup winners will have home advantage in the last stage in the following edition, being able to host the final and decisive stage. This year, this privilege has been given to the 2019 UCI Nation Ranking leaders (Belgium).

THE 2020 RACE

The 10 stages will touch all continents, starting and finishing in Europe. Starting from the UK in November, the race will continue Eastwise, towards Turkey, then South Africa, Thailand, two stages in Oceania - Australia and New Zealand respectively, Colombia, United States, Spain, and lastly Belgium. Races will be run on Sundays. The complete calendar:

15th November 2020, Brighton (United Kingdom)
22nd November 2020, Antalya (Turkey)
29th November 2020, Cape Town (South Africa)
6th December 2020, Chiang Mai (Thailand)
13th December 2020, Wollongong (Australia)
20th December 2020, Christchurch (New Zealand)
27th December 2020, Medellín (Colombia)
3rd January 2021, Santa Cruz, CA (United States of America)
10th January 2021, Sevilla (Spain)
17th January 2021, Liège (Belgium)

THE STAGES

The first edition of the UCI Road World Cup will start with a medium mountain stage, with the finish line set on top of the Elm Grove côte, in Brighton. Then, a flat stage and an easy medium mountain stage will see sprinters as potential winners. Moving to Asia, Oceania and the Americas, the WC will enter the hard part, with 5 stages that will benefit climbers and puncheurs. Back to Europe, and the race will give another opportunity for sprinters to shine in Sevilla, before the last mini version of the Liège-Bastogne-Liège that will crown the first UCI Road World Cup champion. The rationale was to place cosecutively the stages dedicated to the same specialists, dividing the World Cup in three sections: hilly + flat (2+1) - hard mountain (5) - flat + hilly (1+1).

STAGE 1 - BRIGHTON maps/viewtrack/346616
269 km, medium mountain, 21 km circuit to be repeated 8 times.

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After Harrogate, England hosts the first stage of the new World Cup. The sum of the Elm Grove climb (2 km, 4,4%), côte that was included in the Brighton stage circuit of the 1994 Tour de France, is where the finish line is situated, making puncheurs the bookies' favorites for this stage. The race starts at the seaside, proceeding towards the Seven Sisters national park and Eastbourne. The peloton will then make a U-turn, going back towards Brighton but not before entering the town of Lewes, where the group will admire the beautiful castle. Before entering the circuit, riders will climb the Ditchling Beacon (2,2 km, 6,3%). The first lap will only be a half lap, with the peloton entering at the end of Coldean Lane in the Hollingbury climb (3,9 km, 2,5%). The descent will lead to Preston Park, follow Western Road and going into the neighbouring Hove, going back towards the Brighton Pier on the seaside, taking a left at the Old Steine, surpassing the famous Pavilion and finally climbing Elm Grove. The circuit will be repeated 8 times. Contenders must keep enough stamina to beat their rivals in the uphill sprint.

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STAGE 2 - ANTALYA maps/viewtrack/346549
258 km, flat, 11,5 km circuit to be repeated 11 times

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The UCI World Championship will go to Turkey for the first time in history, landing in Antalya, city that has a growing bond with cycling, considering the annual organization of the Tour of Antalya. This WC stage will serve in ampliating the Antalyans' - and Turkish people altogether - passion for cycling, while spotlighting the city of Antalya in a worlding event after the 2016 Expo. In fact, the placemaking purpose is also highlighted in the proposed track: cyclists will cross all tourist attraction, starting from the seafront, at the Karaalioglu Park, and passing by three gorgoeus waterfalls, first by going Eastbound towards the Düden waterfalls, then shifting Northwise towards the Kursunlu waterfalls and lastly going back to Antalya passing by the Upper Düden waterfalls. The peloton will enter the circuit in the North, just before the Antalyaspor Stadium. The circuit will present the city's main touristic attractions, too, as the Hadrian Castle Gate and the Old Bazaar. The race will be a sprinters' ride, the final circuit in the city long 11,5 km to be repeated 11 is completely flat, albeit the very last straight is positioned in a very slight slope (0,5% gradient).

STAGE 3 - CAPE TOWN maps/viewtrack/346310
288 km, medium mountain, 46 km circuit to be repeated 4 times

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For the first time ever in the UCI Road World Championships, an event will take place in Africa, particularly in Cape Town. The Southafrican city will host the third stage of the WC, with riders crossing its beautiful landscapes. The race starts from the city center, proceeding towards the suggestive Cape Peninsula, where riders will climb the first two asperities of the day (Red Hill and Ou Kaapse Weg). Then, the peloton will ride back Northwise, entering the circuit after climbing the Constantia Nek côte for the first time, but from the Southeastern side. In fact, the long circuit (46 km) sees two climbs: the short Little Lions Head (1 km, 3,8%) and, most importantly, Costantia Nek (5,1 km, 3,8%), taken from the Western side. The circuit runs across the Table Mountain national park, going firstly along the seaside and later finishing in front of the Castle of Good Hope in the city center. The race is open to every ending, also for sprinters who manage to save their legs in the not long nor difficult climbs. It will be interesting to see whether teams will manage to keep the breakaways in sight, making the race finish in a compact sprint, or if the 288 km of this race (longest stage of this WC) will be too hard to handle, favoring breakaways and attacks.

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STAGE 4 - CHIANG MAI maps/viewtrack/346153
276 km, high mountain, 91 km circuit to be repeated 3 times

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Another first time for the UCI Road World Championships, landing in the capital of the old reign Lanna, Chiang Mai, in Northern Thailand. Chiang Mai's intention to is promote Thailand and the city itself as the regional cycling hub, proposing a high mountain stage, the first of the five stages for grimpeurs. The route will propose three well-known climbs to local cyclists on the Chiang Mai mountains. The race will take place on the day after most beloved festival by Thais, Father's Day, which celebrating Late King Rama IX's birthday, a sacred figure for the Thai people. The race plunges directly into the 91 km circuit, to be repeated 3 times. The peloton will climb three consecutive asperities, 12 August 2548 Gazebo (10,5 km, 4,2%), Samoeng Viewpoint (4,8 km, 8,2%), Phu Mork Dao Viewpoint (6,8 km, 4,2%), to which follow a long descent and 23 km of flat terrain before the finish line, located in front of the Chiang Mai city ancient walls. This very particular route gives the race many possibilities to develop: an early mass breakaway could be difficult to be contained, the attack of the favorites in the last laps could be on the other hand cought up by the peloton, and finisseurs can have their say at the end of such a long race in the final flat kilometers. One thing is for sure: it will be a very interesting ride.

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STAGE 5 - WOLLONGONG maps/viewtrack/346425
253 km, medium mountain, 31 km circuit to be repeated 5 times

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Wollongong was assigned the 2021 UCI Road World Championships, it asked and obtained to feature in the first ever UCI Road World Cup instead, for the second time in Australia after Melbourne 2010. A country passionate about cycling, this WC goes to Australia in the perfect time of the year, when the weather will offer fantastic days. The race, starting from Wollongong's city center, will go Northwise, crossing the stunning Sea Cliff Bridge to reach, after a climb the town of Helensborough (5,8 km, 3,6%). Then, the peloton will make a U-turn, going back to Wollongong and entering the circuit just before the Mount Keira climb (6,4 km, 6%). After the descent, the group will go back to the city's center, where the finish line is located, and repeating the circuit 5 times. The race will prize a grimpeur who will be able to make a difference in the last climb, enough to distance the rest of the riders in the descent and the last 9 flat kilometers. Only strong legs allowed.

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STAGE 6 - CHRISTCHURCH maps/viewtrack/346237
252,5 km, medium mountain, 42,5 km circuit to be repeated 2 times

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The World Cup lands in the land of the Kiwis for the first time in its history, the last new entry country of this edition. The city hosts the WC stage to present the country of New Zealand and itself (most importantly, given what happened in March 2019) to the world as a beautiful turistic destination, with stunning view and astonishing landscapes. The race will in fact cross the Southern Peninsula, climbing steep roads with truly amazing viewpoints on the sea and on Christchurch itself. The race will enter its decisive segment 100 km from the end, when the riders will climb Mount Pleasant - won't be so pleasant to the cyclists at the third climb - for the first time (6,5 km, 5,8%). After a brief descent, the group will go back to Christchurch's center, where the finish line is located. The athletes will complete the circuit, which also sees the Dyers Pass climb (6,2 km, 5%), another two times. The first part of the race will be decisive in determining which riders will be able to compete for the stage win in the last part: who will have more energy left will prevail.

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STAGE 7 - MEDELLÍN maps/viewtrack/347827
277,5 km, high mountain, no circuit

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The queen stage of the first UCI Road World Cup will be in South America, precisely in Colombia. And which place better than the "City of Eternal Spring" could host its late-December event? Medellín and its high altitudes will host the seventh stage of this WC, probably the most demanding. It is the only stage without a circuit, although the riders will cross the finish time three times. The first time will be after the first segment of the race, when the group will climb Alto de Las Palmas (14,1 km, 6,3%) right after the start to reach Rionegro, continuing in the plateau towards La Ceja and descending back to the finish line after the Loma del Escobero climb (10,2 km, 3,5%). Then, the race will heat up: riders will go up for the first time the toughest climb of the WC, La Meseta (12.3 km, 8,3%). Instead of plummeting right back towards the finish line, the group will continue to climb Alto de Boquerón (9,2 km, 4,3%). The penultimate passage on the finish line will see riders already direct riders to the La Meseta for the last asperity of the day. Only the strongest climbers, most resistent to high altitudes, will be able to compete for this stage win.

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STAGE 8 - SANTA CRUZ maps/viewtrack/347901
274 km, high mountain, 46,5 km circuit to be repeated 4 times

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The final mountain stage of this UCI Road World Cup will be in California, first time for the West Coast state, third time for the USA. The race will be held in the surfers' sanctuary Santa Cruz, who intends to make a name for itself for cycling as well. In fact, the attempt is remarkable: the last mountain stage is the one with the most positive difference (6318 meters in 274 km). The race, starting from the city center, will climb two asperities (Patchen Pass and Ben Lomound Mountain) before entering the circuit, to be repeated 4 times. The latter sees a first flat 15 km segment along the majestic coastline that leads to the circuit climb, Bonny Doon (11 km, 5,8%). The easy descent will lead to the finish line, giving the chance to those who are ahead after the last climb to get a hold of the first spot. Last call for grimpeurs.

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STAGE 9 - SEVILLA maps/viewtrack/347349
271,5 km, flat, 14,5 km circuit to be repeated 18 times

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The UCI Road World Cup goes back to Europe for the last two stages, stopping firstly in the Andalusia capital, Sevilla. The temperate winters make the city ideal for a race in January, and that is why Sevilla decided to host for the first time a UCI Road World Championship event. The race, much like Chiang Mai's, verges directly into the circuit; however, it is only 14,5 km long, allowing spectators to see the group pass on the finish line 19 times. The starting point is located at the Betis football stadium, Estadio Benito Villamarín, and the finish line is located in front of the city rivals Sevilla stadium, Estadio Ramón Sánchez-Pizjuán. The group passes by the train station, the Basílica de María Auxiliadora, the Murillo Gardens, Plaza de España, the María Luisa Park and lastly the Amate Park, before turning into the final straight (with the Gran Plaza to be surpassed). Sprinters will have the last chance to shine, in a completely flat track. Only a big surprise will lead to an ending that is not a group sprint.

STAGE 10 - LIÈGE maps/viewtrack/347872
256 km, medium mountain, 18 km circuit to be repeated 10 times

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The first UCI Road World Cup title will be assigned in the cold roads of one of the most representative cycling cities in the world, Liège. Belgium, who had the 2021 UCI Road World Championships event assigned, decided to locate the decisive stage of the WC in the Vallonie city. The route favours the great puncheurs of Belgium, as Gilbert, Van Avermaet, Van Aert and Evanepoel, but it cannot be excluded a sprint ending, with the most resistant sprinters that will survive the 2045 meters of positive difference. It is a very interesting last stage, where every country still battling for the title can say their word. In fact, the route partly reminds of the last part of the Liège-Bastogne-Liège track, with its final côtes included (Côte de la Redoute, Côte de la Roche-aux-Faucons and Côte de Saint-Nicolas). Only the Côte de Saint-Nicolas (1,2 km, 6,7%), however, is included in the final circuit, that lasts 18 km and that is repeated 10 times. What differs from the Liège-Bastogne-Liège is the weather: cold will be a very important factor in this race. The risk of snow is present, as well: city roads will be kept well dry, and in case of snowy roads, only the final circuit will be done, skipping the Redoute and the Roche-aux-Faucons, with 3 extra laps. The path to glory will climax in the central roads of Liège.

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jajoejoe
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by jajoejoe »

Here is my submission for this contest. Thank you for the contest, especially considering you're very busy with the PCM community cup a.k.a. the World Championships.
maps/tours/view/14827

Rules: The only rules are considering the points scale which is like the following.
For Classification per race:
1st: 500 points
2nd: 400
3rd: 325
4th: 275
5th: 225
6th: 175
7th: 150
8th: 125
9th: 100
10th: 85
11th: 70
12th: 60
13th: 50
14th: 40
15th: 35
16th-20th: 30
21st-30th: 20
31st-50th: 10
51st-100th: 5

KOM
Per race there are 3 mountain sprints with the same points scale as a TdF Cat. 1 Climb so:
10-8-6-4-2-1 points at every categorised climb

Intermediate sprint
2 intermediate sprints close to the finish line with the same points scale as the Tour de France:
20-17-15-13-11-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 Points on offer at every intermediate sprint.

So let's get into the actual races:

Round 1, Fuji. November 1 2020
maps/viewtrack/346314
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This race is a little tricky as it gets a bit colder around the Fuji than I thought, but it's still good enough to organize a race here, this is also why it's the first race immediatly at the start of november. It's a mountain race as everyone can see and an immediate test for everyone that wants to win the world cup.

Round 2, Bradford. 15 november 2020
maps/viewtrack/346914
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What is a series of one day races without the cobbles? Not the regular Flemish or French cobbles but the british ones. This isn't reserved for the cobbled riders you see normally early in the year as these hills are sooooo steep.
Seeing as the profile is an absolute mess, here is a more in depth look at the last 100 Kilometers:
maps/viewtrack/348642
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Round 3, Luxembourg. 22 November 2020
maps/viewtrack/346957
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A bit of an LBL-esque race this time in the small country of Luxembourg. It starts with some long clims and finishes with short (and steep) climbs around the city of Luxembourg.

Round 4, Clermont-Ferrand. 29 November 2020
maps/viewtrack/346954
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Hills, but make it steeper. The Col du Chevelard is the deciding factor in this race contested in the city of Clermont-Ferrand in the shadow of the Puy de Dome.

Round 5, Vicenza. 6 December 2020
maps/viewtrack/346619
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The Colli Berici are where this race is contested. A route that first goes through the Colli Euganei and then tackles the steep climbs of the Colli Berici with a final circuit contested over 6 climbs south of Vicenza.

Round 6, Abu Dhabi. 20 December 2020
maps/viewtrack/346941
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Seeing as these races will be organized by the UCI we had to get sold out by oil money and race in the desert. Start and finish is at the Yas Marina Circuit. First chance for the sprinters.

Round 7, San Francisco. 10 January 2021
maps/viewtrack/345942
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After a break inwhich the riders could spend some time with family and friends there is a race in the city of San Fran, a bit like the Canadian races in september it is on a slightly hilly city circuit in North-America.

Round 8, Medellin. 17 January 2021
maps/viewtrack/346311
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A mountainous race in and around Medellin in Colombia. After Davandluz submitted his routes I figured out our races looked a lot liked each other but I can assure we didn't copy each other as I created my route on the 8th of may and he did on the 11th of may and as I kept it on private all this time he couldn't see mine.

Round 9, Melbourne. 24 January 2021
maps/viewtrack/346715
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A sort of criterium through Melbourne for the riders. I placed on this place on the calender so that it is just after the Tour Down Under so riders can stay in Australia.

Round 10, Oostende. 31 January 2021
maps/viewtrack/346280
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Seeing as these races had to be around the same time as the Cyclocross calender, what better way to finish it on the same day and in the same place as the Cyclocross world championships. It's a flat race, but the cobbles shouldn't be a spanner in the works for the sprint cannons that want to get their last shot at victory in this world cup.

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emmea90
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Re: Contest #4 - UCI Road World Cup

Post by emmea90 »

benoît.guillot wrote:
11/05/2020, 14:29
SmokingPuppy841 wrote:
10/05/2020, 19:17
benoît.guillot wrote:
09/05/2020, 15:11


No kidding :lol: :lol: :lol:
One thing to consider about your plans is that - although you're route might not work in the winter - you're only failing on 1 part of the criteria. So you still stand a chance of doing alright in the contest.
Yes I think I will try. My point is that I'm not sure of route I choose in "exotic" countries. I don't want to make a course on highway or on dirt road without knowing it...
The editor has a cobble map and a dirt roads map. zizi
Software Engineer, Cycling Fanatic

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